Showing posts with label - - - Haiku - - -. Show all posts
Showing posts with label - - - Haiku - - -. Show all posts

2015/09/02

heijoshin even mind

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heijooshin 平常心 Heijoshin, the Even Mind
presence of mind / peace of mind


Try to develop an "even mind", heijooshin 平常心, where positive or negative remarks do not affect you emotionally
and only use them to improve your work.

The thought of getting published in a haiku magazine should not be the ultimate goal of your writing haiku. Try writing haiku with the correct attitude and peace of mind.

. Heijoshin and Haiku .




Daruma for Heijoshin and positive thinking
- source : 平常心とプラス思考 -

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heijo shin kore michi 平常心これ道 / 平常心是道
“ordinary mind is the Tao” - へいじょうしんこれみち




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- quote
Kendo Terminology: Heijoshin
There are two parts in Kanji; "Heijo" and "shin". Heijo is ordinary, usual or normal. Shin is as you may know already "mind" or "heart".

So it means you have to keep the state of your mind as it is normally.

However, then, if you are hyper, emotional or energetic all the time, then it may be the normal state of your mind.

Let me break down the kanji "heijo" into two parts;
"hei" and "jo". "jo" means "always" or "all the time". And "hei" means "flat". So keep the state of your mind flat all the time.

What does it mean?
Shin or kokoro can be disturbed all the time. Sometimes you get surprised. Sometimes you become afraid. Or you may get panic and you lose your mind. (These called shikai)

Whenever your mind is disturbed like above, your mind is not stable, i.e., not flat. Thus, heijoshin means "in any situations, you must keep the state of your mind as flat as possible to think clearly and make the right decision".
- source : kendo-guide.com


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source : seikeikai.net/gallery

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- quote -
Heijoshin (or peace of mind)
is the by-product of a person’s complete inner being. It can only be achieved by refining the whole inner essence and this can only be accomplished if one’s intellect, emotions, and character are developed in balance. Heijoshin literally translated means constant stable spirit. Such a translation hardly does it justice...

To achieve heijoshin as a martial artist requires a lifestyle of discipline, effort, sacrifice and commitment. Such a commitment to developing excellence of character is what sets the martial artist apart from most people in a confused and unhappy society. As we discover, the true nature of martial arts training leads us to a fuller understanding of the nature of life itself. With this understanding comes peace of mind and true and lasting happiness.
- source : underthemoonshadow.blogspot.jp -

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- quote -
 『平常心是道』という言葉があります。

もともとは、1,300年程も昔の禅問答に起源を有する言葉ですが、道とは仏道のことであり、仏道は平常心であるという問答だそうです
仏道とは決して特別なものではなく、普段の平常心そのものであるという意味でしょうか。。

何だか難しいですが、『平常心』という言葉は、今でも普通に使われています
例えば、大事な会議に平常心で臨むとか、大一番の勝負にも平常心を忘れずにしたいとか・・

そう言うと、『平常心』というのはとてもわかり易い言葉に聞こえますが、実際にはわかったようでわからない言葉の代表格みたいなものですね

静かで落ち着いた、事にあたってもうろたえない・・  そんな心を言うのでしょうか

でも、人間の心って、普段から揺れ動いています。怒ったり喜んだり、嘆いたり楽しんだり、常に移ろうのが人間の心です

予期しない出来事のほうがはるかに多いのが人生。その度に、あわてたりうろたえたり、悩んだりしながら生きているのが人間の姿なのではないでしょうか。。それであるからこそ、人生って面白いものなんだと思います

悟りすましたような落ち着いた心境よりも、泣いたり笑ったり、何かに感動したりむかついたり、そんな心の動きをあるがままに受け入れていく方が、大きな人生であるように思います

もしかしたら『平常心』とは、人間の日常に起きる心のさざ波の全てのことではないでしょうか

素直に泣いたり笑ったり怒ったり喜んだりしながら生きていく、それは決してダメなことではなくて、むしろそれこそが人間の生きるべき道であり、『平常心』なのかもしれませんね.
- source : museki_1954 -


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CLICK for more photos !

美好生活需要平常心

- reference -

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. Fudō Myō-ō, Fudoo Myoo-Oo 不動明王 Fudo Myo-O
Acala Vidyârâja - Vidyaraja – Fudo Myoo .





13. Fudo Shin.
Immovable Spirit. Unaffected spirit (heijo shin).
Fudo Myo-o is one of the protector gods within the Buddhist panoply, so the translation could also be to have the spirit of Fudo Myo-o. Fudo Myo-o waits at the gate of hell to assist those who have strayed from the path -- he assists them with the rope of truth and his sword cuts through delusion to help those in need of enlightenment.

. The Immovable Spirit 不動心 / 不動の心 Fudo no Kokoro .


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CLICK for more amulets !


. O-Mamori お守り Amulets and Talismans .


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. Koan and Haiku 公案と俳句 .


. Japan - Shrines and Temples - ABC .


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- - #heijoshin #evenmind #heijooshin -
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2015/01/29

Sho Kannon

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- Kannon Bosatsu 観音菩薩 - ABC-List -
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Shoo Kannon,Shō Kannon 聖観音 / 正観音 Sho Kannon

- quote
The Sacred Form of Kannon, the model for other forms of Kannon. Worship of this deity began in India around the 1st or 2nd century AD. Also one of the Six Manifestations of Kannon who protect the six realms of karmic rebirth. In this latter role, Shō Kannon brings salvation to those in the hell realm (in some traditions, Shō Kannon is instead responsible for beings in the realm of hungry ghosts).

Shō Kannon represents the root form, the unchangeable form, of Kannon -- the pure, noble, sacred, holy form -- while his/her other manifestations are commonly referred to as the 33 Keshin or Henge Kannon. Shō comes from the Sanskrit "Arya," meaning holy. In Japan, another name for Shō-Kannon is Guze Kannon, one referring to the simple (non-esoteric) form of this deity. The earliest extant wooden statue in Japan (first half 7th century AD) is the Guze Kannon housed at Hōryū-ji Temple 法隆寺 in Nara.

In traditional Japanese Buddhist art and sculpture, Shō Kannon commonly holds a lotus bud or water vase (see Objects Page for significance of these important icons), and wears a crown that contains a small image of Amida Buddha (called a kebutsu 化仏). The kebutsu symbolizes Kannon’s role as one of Amida's main attendants.

Shingon Mantra (ご真言)
おん あろりきゃ そわか On Arorikyu Sowaka
- source : Mark Schumacher


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大宝山来迎院阿弥陀寺 来迎院 Raigo-In


source : Kubota san, facebook

made by 松本喜三郎 Matsumoto Kisaburo (1825 - 1891)
from Kumamoto 熊本市


熊本市春日6丁目8-8 Kumamoto 来迎院 Raigo-In
熊本市春日、万日山(まんにちやま)中腹にある大宝山来迎院阿弥陀寺(たいほうざん らいこういん あみだじ)は、大宝年中(701~703年)、行基(ぎょうき)により創建されたといわれています。かつて万日山は別名阿弥陀寺山とよばれ、ふもとの集落は阿弥陀寺村といわれるほど栄えていました。もともとは法相宗の大寺院で、万日山山上に奥の院、本堂があり、現在来迎院があるあたりは僧坊があったと伝えられています。

平安時代に衰退しましたが、寛喜2年(1230年)、筑前国善道寺の聖光上人の弟子蓮阿上人が浄土宗寺院として再興したといわれています。しかし、肥後国衆一揆の兵火が万日山を襲い、堂塔は焼け落ち、多数の僧侶が焼死しました。その遺骨を葬ったので、万日山には坊主山との別名もありました。加藤清正入国後、城下に寺院が集められ、阿弥陀寺も細工町に移されました。そのおり、万日山に残った寺を別院として、来迎院(俗に古阿弥陀寺)とよぶようになりました。
- source : www.pref.kumamoto.jp



CLICK for more photos !


- reference - Matsumoto Kisaburo
He was famous for "Living Dolls".
The term iki ningyo did not come into common parlance until the early years of the Meiji Period (1868-1912)

- quote
IKI NINGYO: LIVING DOLLS AND THE LEGACY OF MATSUMOTO KISABURO
In 1868, in preparation for a large-scale exhibit of iki ningyo (living dolls)* to be held at the Asakusa Sensoji Temple in the newly christened capital of Tokyo, Matsumoto Kisaburo (1826-1892) created his most enduring masterpiece: a life-sized image of Kannon dressed as a female traveler. The exhibit itself, designed as a series of vignettes involving over 33 individual figures, was a tour de force and represented Kisaburo at the peak of his powers as a ningyo artist. It was based on popular stories of faith and manifestations of the power of the Buddhist deity Kannon, called the Saikoku sanjusan [Miraculous Deeds of Kannon at the 33 places of Shikoku].



This particular image, the Tanikumi Kannon, clothed in rich silken robes and wearing the lacquered cap of a traveling noblewoman, was suffused with a life and vitality that gave these striking figures their name: iki-ningyo or "living" dolls. The graceful pose of the body with the head looking back slightly over her left shoulder, her finely formed hand, ripe and fairly pulsing with life, the index finger pointing delicately into the distance, her enigmatic expression, beatific and haunting, was all masterfully rendered. Her ivory teeth and inset glass eyes, exquisitely executed, completed the image of divinity. Such was the perfection of this particular figure when Kisaburo finished it that, rather than including it in the intended exhibit, he donated the piece to Jo koku-ji Temple in his home town of Kumamoto where it remains to this day as an object of veneration. A second piece was subsequently created for inclusion in the Kannon exhibit which first appeared in 1871.
- snip -
. . . . . Kisaburo's Saikoku sanjusan was just one of the many misemono (exhibitions) held at Asakusa Temple during the 19th century.
- snip -
Kumamoto
According to family documents originally held by Kisaburo’s descendant Serikawa Saburo and reviewed by Kuboto Beisho in his work Ningyo-shi, [Tokyo, 1937], Matsumoto Kisaburo was born on February 15, Bunsei 8 (1826) to an oil salesman named Matsumoto Hambei living in the Ideguchi area of Kumamoto, Hijo Prefecture. Early in life he showed great promise in carving and was apprenticed to a local scabbard maker. His talent and rapid progress soon earned Kisaburo the enmity of his fellow apprentices and abuse at their hands eventually forced him to return home where he crafted lanterns and paper stencils for textile dyeing. At this point he also began to turn his artistic focus on the creation of dedicatory figures called hono ningyo. A local festival tradition venerating the Buddhist bodhisattva Jizo (Kitshigharba) involved the creation of these hono ningyo which were carved and displayed in each neighborhood before being presented to the temple. Competition between the various neighborhoods was quite lively and Kisaburo along with another young artist by the name of Yasumoto Kamehachi soon distinguished himself as a superior artist, each reportedly challenging the other in the creation of increasingly sophisticated forms of ningyo.
Osaka
Edo
Iki Ningyo
NINGYO MISEMONO LISTING

The Kisaburo Legacy
Over the some 40 years of iki ningyo production, Kisaburo created literally hundreds of figures ranging from the beautiful to the grotesque, from the erotic to the quotidian. But out of this impressive body of work, only three existing iki ningyo definitively attributable to him remain to attest to his genius: the Tanikumi Kannon at Jokoku-ji Temple, another Kannon image also dedicated to a temple in the Kumamoto area, and, interestingly enough, a male figure at the Smithsonion Institute in Washington DC. The latter being a special commission piece ordered by a gentleman named Kaplan. This piece, remarkable in its attention to detail and its high sense of realism is the only figure known to be signed by Kisaburo, bearing an inset seal on the bottom of his foot.
- source : Alan Pate


- Kisaburo Matsumoto on facbook -


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Heilige Kannon
Aarya-Avalokiteshvara, Padmapaani, Padmapani

Orthodoxe menschliche Gestalt. Gehört nicht zu den abweichenden Figuren. Seit im 6. und 7. Jhd. die abweichenden Kannon-Statuen immer häufiger wurde, erhielten die einfachen Statuen diese Bezeichnung.
Zusammen mit Seishi Bosatsu in der Amida-Dreiergruppe. Häufiger als Einzelstatue besonderer Gegenstand der Verehrung, z.B. Yume Kannon, Guze Kannon und Kudara Kannon im Tempel Horyuuji in Nara.
Am 100. Todestag wird diese Kannon mit einer Lotusknospe und einem Lotusblatt verehrt.

Sitzt auf einem Lotussockel.
Hohe Krone mit Verkörperung des Amida. Rechte Hand erhoben zur Geste Fürchtet Euch nicht! oder gesenkt zur Geste der Wunschgewährung. In der linken Hand eine Lotusknospe, mit der rechten diese Knospe aufblätternd (daher der Name "Padmapaani": Der mit dem Lotus in der Hand). Oder ein Wassergefäß, ein Juwel oder einen Wedel in der Hand. Die Gegenstände werden entweder fest in der Hand gehalten oder erscheinen zwischen den gefalteten Händen eingeklemmt.

Als Dreiergruppe mit Jikokuten und Tamonten (Tempel Joshoji, Tokyo).




. . . CLICK for more Photos !

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大寒の臍うつくしき聖観音
daikan no heso utsukushiku shoo kannon

the beautiful navel
of this Sacred Kannon 
in the great cold


大石登世子 Oishi Toyoko


. daikan, taikan 大寒 "great cold" .
According to the Asian lunar calendar, the 20th day of the first lunar month is one of the coldest days.
Now re-located in January, but it should be February.



source : shokkou/archives

At temple 薬師寺 Yakushi-Ji, Nara


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- Kannon Bosatsu 観音菩薩 - Introduction -




. Join the Kannon Bosatsu Gallery - Facebook .



. O-Mamori お守り Amulets and Talismans .

. Japan - Shrines and Temples - ABC List .


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[ . BACK to WORLDKIGO . TOP . ] - - - #jizo - - -
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2014/08/23

Chokugan-Ji temples

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Chokuganji 勅願寺 Chokugan-Ji, "Imperial Temple"

temples established by direct orders from an Emperor

temples constructed on behalf of an emperor, with the wish to bring peace and unity to the land of Japan.
a temple built upon Imperial orders, in the name of an emperor

temple built at an imperial behest

a temple where prayers are offered for the well-being of the Imperial Family and the peace of the country, sometimes an existing temple was claimed for this purpose later after its founding.

When an emperor decided to have a temple built with a certain vow to the deities, he usually entrusted a high priest with the effort to visit that region and supervise the construction.
The founder of a temple is called

. kaisan 開山 temple founder, "opening the mountain" .

The kaisan is usually the first head monk (juushoku 住職 jushoku) of this temple.

The hall to honor this priest is the
kaisandoo 開山堂 "Hall of the Founder".


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kiganji 祈願所 "place for special prayers"
this could be a Buddhist temple or Shinto shrine

Temples for the imperial family were called
kiganji 祈願寺 kigan-ji "temple of supplication"
or chokugan-ji.

There are seven kigan-ji for the Tokugawa family.

Before the Meiji reform, many temples and shrined resided side by side in the same compound.

Many shrines were "clan shrines" for the clan deity 氏神 (ujigami).


Nanatsudera 稲園山 長福寺(七寺)

Official temple for the Owari Tokugawa clan 尾張徳川藩祈願所
- source : www7b.biglobe.ne.jp


Yudonosan Dainichibo 湯殿山 大日坊
Yudonosan ranks with Ise and Kumano as one of the three great sacred places in Japan.
Kiganji of Tokugawa Shogunate
In the 8th year of Keicho (AD 1603), Tokugawa Ieyasu established the Edo Shogunate. Two years later, he retired to Sumpu Castle, making his son, Hidetada his successor as Shogun. Ofuku (Kasuga-no-Tsubone), who was appointed the official wet nurse on the birth of Takechiyo, Hidetada’s son in 1604, became a major influence ruling O-Oku (the inner palace).
The ostensible reason for Ofuku’s visit in supplication to Yudonosan and the statue of Dainichi-Nyorai(Mahavirocana) which was made by Kukai Kobo Daishi and the principle image of Yudonosan Dainichibo was for recovery from illness of Hidetada, but in fact, a desperate and secret supplication was made to strengthen Takechiyo physically and establish him as the successor to the Shogunate.
As a result, Takechiyo became the third Shogun, Tokugawa Iemitsu 徳川家光.
Kasuga-no-Tsubone donated the statue of Dainichi-Nyorai to Yudonosan-Dainichibo, and since then, it was recognized as one of the seven Kiganji (Temples of Supplication) located through Japan under the patronage of the Tokugawa-Shogunate.
- source : www.dainichibou.or.jp


Kannon-in 観音院 ,
formally known as Fudarakusan Jigen-ji Kannon-in (補陀落山慈眼寺観音院?), is a Buddhist temple in Uemachi district of the city of Tottori, Tottori Prefecture. Kannon-in was built early in the Edo period (1603 – 1868) and is noted for its Edo-style Japanese garden.

Kannon-in built in the early Edo period and its history is closely related to that of the Ikeda clan. Ikeda Tadakatsu (池田忠雄) (1602 – 1632), daimyō of the Okayama Domain in Bizen Province and lord of Okayama Castle, died at a young age and was succeeded by his 3 year old son Ikeda Mitsunaka (池田光仲) (1630 – 1693). The Tokugawa shogunate named the infant Mitsunaka daimyō of Tottori Domain in Hōki and Inaba provinces.
Mitsunaka's oldest son, the second lord of the Tottori Domain, named Kannon-in a kiganji (祈願寺) prayer temple. The temple attained the high status of one of the eight prayer temples (八ヶ寺 hachigatera) of the domain, a status it would retain throughout the Edo period.
- source : wikipedia


- further reference - TBA -

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The most well-known is probably the

. Toodaiji 東大寺 Todai-Ji . - Nara.
by Shoomu Tennoo 聖武天皇 Shomu Tenno (701 - 756)

Other temples dedicated by this emperor are

太田山 豊楽寺 Buraku-Ji - Kochi (真言宗、高知県大豊町)
躑躅山 林昌寺 Rinsho-Ji - Osaka (真言宗、大阪府泉南市)
巌金山 宝厳寺 Hogon-Ji - Shiga (真言宗、滋賀県長浜市)
阿星山 長寿寺 Choju-Ji - Shiga (天台宗、滋賀県湖南市)
石光山 石山寺 Ishiyamadera - Shiga (東寺真言宗、滋賀県大津市)
鼻高山 霊山寺 Ryozen-Ji - Nara (真言宗、奈良市)
泉生山 酒見寺 Sagami-Ji - Hyogo (真言宗、兵庫県加西市)

忍辱山 円成寺 Enjo-Ji - Nara(真言宗、奈良県奈良市)
聖武天皇・孝謙天皇 Shomu Tenno and Koken Tenno (718 - 770)

大悲山 慈眼院 Jigen-In - Osaka (真言宗、大阪府泉佐野市)
天武天皇・聖武天皇 Tenmu Tenno ( ? - 686) and Shomu Tenno


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Amidaji 阿弥陀寺 Amida-Ji
Teramachi-dôri, Kyoto

Emperor Ôgimachi正親町天皇 (1517-1539) Ogimachi
founded around 1532-1554 by Saint Seigyoku Shônin

Seigyoku had deep connections to the Oda family, and on 1582/6/2, on the day of the Honnôji Incident (when Oda Nobunaga was betrayed and killed), it is said he gathered the bones and/or other remains of Nobunaga, Nobutada, and the roughly one hundred followers who died that day, and buried those remains here at Amidadera.
- source : toranosuke

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Choofukujuji 長福寿寺 Chofukuju-Ji
Chiba 千葉県長生郡長南町

桓武天皇 Kanmu Tenno (703 - 806)
by Dengyo Daishi Saicho 伝教大師 最澄 in 798

- - - With elephants at the gate !
. . . CLICK here for Photos !

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. Daiyuuji 太融寺 Daiyu-Ji .
Kita, Osaka 大阪市北区太融寺町3
Kobo Daishi built this temple on the strong wish of Emperor Saga in 821.


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. Mibudera 壬生寺 Mibu-Dera .
31 Mibunaginomiyacho, Nakagyo Ward, Kyoto,

In 1077 the Emperor Shirakawa 白川 (r.1073-87) awarded Mibu-dera Temple the status of Chokuganji.

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. 大内山 仁和寺 Ninna-Ji .
in 888 by Emperor Uda 宇多天皇.
京都市右京区 - Kyoto

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Senjuji 高田山 専修寺 Senju-Ji, Takadayama
Mie, Tsu 三重県津市

by Gotsuchi Mikado 後土御門天皇 (1442 - 1500)

Founded by Shinran in 1226
- source : wikipedia


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- List of the most important chokugan-ji
主要な勅願寺

- - - - - 後醍醐天皇 Godaigo Tenno (1288 - 1339)
具足山 妙顕寺 Myoken-Ji Kyoto (日蓮宗、京都市上京区)
塔尾山 如意輪寺 Nyoirin-Ji - Nara (浄土宗、奈良県吉野郡) - 後醍醐天皇

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- - - - - 光仁天皇 Konin Tenno (709 - 781)
秋篠寺 Akishinodera - Nara(単立、奈良県奈良市)
根本山 神峯山寺 Kabusan-Ji - Osaka (天台宗、大阪府高槻市)


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- - - - - 推古天皇 Suiko Tenno (554 - 628)
比金山 如意寺 Nyoi-Ji - Hyogo (天台宗、兵庫県神戸市)
那智山 青岸渡寺 Seiganto-Ji - Wakayama (天台宗、和歌山県那智勝浦町)

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慶徳山 長保寺 Choho-Ji - Wakayama (天台宗、和歌山県海南市)
一条天皇 Ichijo Tenno (980 - 1011)

普門山 長久寺 Chokyu-Ji - Shiga(真言宗豊山派、滋賀県彦根市)
後三条天皇 Gosanjo Tenno (1034 - 1073)

深雪山 醍醐寺 Daigo-Ji - Kyoto (真言宗、京都市伏見区)
醍醐天皇 Daigo Tenno (885 - 930)
. Daigoji 醍醐寺 Daigo-Ji .

龍池山 大雲院 Daiun-In - Kyoto (単立、京都府京都市)
後陽成天皇 Goyosei Tenno (1571 - 1617)

天音山 道成寺 Dojo-Ji - Wakayama (天台宗、和歌山県日高川町)
文武天皇 Monmu Tenno (683 - 707)

清水山 観世音寺 Kanzeon-Ji - Fukuoka (天台宗、福岡県太宰府市)
天智天皇 Tenchi Tenno (626 - 672)

七宝山 本山寺 Motoyama-Ji - Kagawa (真言宗、香川県三豊市)
平城天皇 Heizei Tenno (774 - 824)

正法山 妙心寺 Myoshin-Ji - Kyoto(臨済宗、京都市右京区)
花園法皇 Hanazono Tenno (1297 - 1348)

瑞龍山 南禅寺 Nanzen-Ji - Kyoto (臨済宗、京都市左京区)
亀山法皇 Kameyama Tenno (1294 - 1305)
. Nanzenji 南禅寺 Nanzen-Ji .

小比叡山 蓮華峰寺 Rengebu-Ji - Niigata (真言宗、新潟県佐渡市)
嵯峨天皇 Saga Tenno (786 - 842)

西大寺 Saidai-Ji - Nara (真言律宗、奈良県奈良市)
称徳天皇 Koken Tenno (718 - 770)

法輪山 正明寺 Shomyo-Ji - Shiga (黄檗宗、滋賀県日野町)
後水尾上皇 Go Mizuno-O Tenno (1596 - 1680)

三身山 太山寺 Taisan-Ji - Hyogo (天台宗、兵庫県神戸市)
元正天皇 Gensho Tenno (680 - 748)

薬師寺 Yakushi-Ji - Nara (法相宗、奈良県奈良市)
天武天皇 ( ? - 686) Tenmu Tenno

松島青龍山 瑞巌寺 Zuigan-Ji - Miyagi (臨済宗、宮城県松島町)
淳和天皇 Junna Tenno - (786 - 840)
. Zuiganji 瑞巌寺 Zuigan-Ji and Matsushima 松島 .

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竜宝山 大徳寺 Daitoku-Ji - Kyoto (臨済宗、京都市北区)
音羽山 清水寺 Kiyomizudera - Kyoto (法相宗、京都市東山区)
定額山 善光寺 Zenko-Ji - Nagano (無宗派、長野県長野市)

- - - reference - wikipedia -


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Temples related to . Fudō Myō-ō, Fudoo Myoo-Oo 不動明王 Fudo Myo-O
Acala Vidyârâja - Vidyaraja - Fudo Myoo .


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. Fukagawa Fudo 深川不動堂 . - Edo/Tokyo
by 嵯峨天皇 Saga Tenno (786 - 842)

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. Daishooin 大聖院 Daisho-In .
勅願堂 Chokugan Do Hall
Itsukushima in Miyajima
kaisan Kobo Daishi Kukai
by Emperor Toba 鳥羽上皇 / 鳥羽天皇 (1103 - 1156)

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. Iwaya Fudo 岩屋不動、岩屋山志明院 - Shinmyo-In .
北区雲ケ畑出谷町261 / 261 Kumogahatadetanichō, Kita-ku, Kyōto
by 淳和天皇 Junna Tenno - (786 - 840)
kaisan Kobo Daishi Kukai

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. Jionji 本山慈恩寺 Honzan Jion-Ji .

山形県寒河江市大字慈恩寺地籍31
31 Jionji, Sagae, Yamagata Prefecture

in 746 priest Baramon Sojo 波羅門僧上 Bodaisenna founded the temple
on request of Shomu Tenno (701 - 756)
犬突き不動 Inu-tsuki Fudo, Fudo Myo-o 不動明王 piercing a dog 

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北向のお不動さん Kitamuki-Fudo facing North in Kyoto
不動寺 Fudo-Ji - 下京区松原通麩屋町
Emperor Kanmu Tenno 桓武天皇 had four "Iwakura" Sacred Stone Areas constructed in Kyoto, one for each heavenly direction. This temple was in the south : 南岩倉 明王院不動寺, with Fudo facing North.
- and -
北向山不動院 Kitamukizan, Fudo-In, Fushimi
Fushimi 伏見区竹田浄菩提院町61
by Emperor Toba 鳥羽上皇 / 鳥羽天皇 (1103 - 1156)

. Kitamuki-Fudo facing North 北向のお不動尊 .


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. Ooyama Fudo 大山の不動 Oyama Fudo .
Afurisan Oyamadera 雨降山 大山寺
神奈川県伊勢原市大山724 / 724 Oyama, Isehara, Kanagawa
by 聖武天皇 Shomu Tenno


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山蛭の落ちて浜名の勅願寺
yamabiru no ochite Hamana no chokuganji

mountain leeches
are falling down at Hamana
imperial temple


Hamada Kozue 浜田小枝




Oogaji 応賀寺(おうがじ)Temple Oga-Ji - 鏡光山応賀寺
静岡県湖西市新居町中之郷68-1 / 68-1 Araichō Nakanogō, Kosai-shi, Shizuoka


Gansuiji 岩水寺(がんすいじ)Gansui-Ji
静岡県浜松市浜北区根堅2238 / 2238 Negata, Hamakita-ku, Hamamatsu, Shizuoka

Makayaji 摩訶耶寺(まかやじ)Makaya-Ji
静岡県浜松市北区三ケ日町摩訶耶421 / 421 Mikkabichō Makaya, Kita-ku, Hamamatsu, Shizuoka

Founded in 724 by 聖武天皇 Shomu Tenno
kaisan is . Gyoki Bosatsu 行基菩薩 (668-749) - Gyōki .


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やまがらの声よくとほる勅願寺
yama kara no koe yoku tooru chokuganji

from the imperial temple
voices are heard
all over the mountain


Yano Noriko 矢野典子

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刈られたる藻の饐うるなり勅願寺
大石悦子

勅願寺朽ちたり雀孕みつゝ
大島民郎

勅願寺馬穴の水の氷りけり
高澤良一

椋鳥や島の高みの勅願寺
阪本謙二

老鴬や杣人とほる勅願寺
大峯あきら

花咲いて浮世の沙汰の勅願寺
大石悦子

葉牡丹で年を迎へし勅願寺
川崎展宏

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. Pilgrimages to Fudo Temples 不動明王巡礼
Fudo Myo-O Junrei - Fudo Pilgrims - INTRODUCTION .



. Japan - Shrines and Temples - ABC .


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[ . BACK to WORLDKIGO . TOP . ]

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2014/06/28

Zen-In Kyoto

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Zen-In, Sekizan Zen-In 赤山禅院

京都府京都市左京区修学院開根坊町18
18 Kaikonbo-cho, Shugakuin, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto



- quote
History of Sekizan Zen-in Temple
Sekizan Zen-in was founded in 888 AD following the will of the high priest Jikaku Daishi Ennin as one of the affliated temples of Hieizan Enryakuji Temple, the Headquarters of Tendai sect Buddhism. Situated in a quiet neighborhood near Kyoto Shugakuin Imperial Villa, it is a famous site for the red tinged autumnal leaves.

The high priest Jikaku Daishi Ennin (794~864) went to China (then under the Tang dynasty) and, enduring a lot of hardships over there, at last mastered Tendai teachings. He thanked Sekizan Daimyojin (泰山府君- 赤山大明神) for its protecting him during his travel to and stay in China, and it is said that he made a vow to build Sekizan Zen-in when back home. Ennin, after returning to Japan, established the basis of Tendai sect of Buddhism, but could not fulfill his vow to build Sekizan Zen-in. Following his will, Anne, the fourth Head Priest of Tendai sect, is thus said to have founded Sekizan Zen-in.

The principal deity, Sekizan Daimyojin, is a brought-back avatar or a double image of Taizanfukun 泰山府君 (Taizan Fukun) in Mt. Sekizan in China (a world heritage site in China) which has been regarded as the head of China’s Five Great Mountains ; Taizanfukun became the founding father of the yin-yan philosophy in Japan. Located at Kyoto’s northeast corner , where the front spirit gate called Omote Kimon 表鬼門 used by demons is believed to stand, Sekizan Zen-in has been worshipped as the temple to protect the citzen from bad luck coming through that gate.

Revered since by the imperial family, Sekizan Zen-in was visited by the retired Emperor Gomizunoo (1596~1680), who is known as the building owner of the Shugakuin Imperial Villa; he, then, ordered repair of the temple buildings and presented a calligraphy of the phrase Sekizan Daimyojin (赤山大明神) done by himself. Holding the sacred pendant paper strips and a cluster of bells for charm performance, a carved monkey is placed on the top of the oratory roof thereby serving a talisman against demons; as such, Sekizan Zen-in has been widely venerated up to this day as the guardian temple against the evil spirits.




- Sekizan Zen-in is also known as :

●Temple of “Sekizan Kugyo (Penance)” :  it is up from here and down to here that the ascetics of Sennichi Kaiho Practice 千日回峰行 (One Thousand-Day Practice, which is the hardest of all Tendai sect Buddhism ascetic practices), repeat climbing up and down, to and from the top of Mt. Hiei.

●Temple where incantations and prayers such as for “Healing Asthma with the incantatory sponged gourd" ぜんそく封じ・へちま加持,
“Mass Service for Rosary” 珠数供養 (正念珠) and “Taizanfukun Festivity” are practiced.




●Where Pilgrimage of the Miyako Shichifukujin (Pilgrimage of Kyoto’s Seven Deities of Good Luck) is said to have originated as the temple of Fukurokuju (Deity of Wealth and Longevity). 赤山禅院 福禄寿

●Temple for commercial prosperity where “Custom of Payment on the 5th and 10th days” originated.


kimon yoke no shin-en 鬼門除けの神猿 Monkey protector on the roof



ema 絵馬 votive tablet of 泰山府君 Taizan Fukun


- Homepage of the temple
Sekizan Zen-in, with its fostered history of over 1100 years, has since amassed various ways and forms of faith.
- source : www.sekizanzenin.com






source : kyotoiiki.exblog.jp

八千枚大護摩供 Fire ritual burning 8000 goma sheets

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enmusubi 「縁結びの相生明神絵馬」
source : http://tencoo.fc2web.com/jinja


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. Fudō Myō-ō, Fudoo Myoo-Oo 不動明王 Fudo Myo-O
Acala Vidyârâja - Vidyaraja .







source : Richard Newton - facebook -


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Sekizan Daimyojin ( 赤山大明神)

- quote -
Sekisan Myōjin
Literally, "Red-Mountain Shining-Deity," one of the "protectors of the dharma" (gohō;) in the Tendai sect of Buddhism. While studying Buddhism in China, the Japanese monk Ennin underwent practice at the Shandong temple Sekizan Hokke-in (Ch. Chishan Fahua Yuan) for the purpose of receiving a personal tutelary deity, and in return vowed to build a meditation hall upon his return to Japan. The hall was in fact constructed by his disciples in 864, and later moved to Nishi-Sakamoto (in northeast Kyoto) in 888, the date representing the first worship of Sekizan Myōjin in Japan.

This event, however, is not recounted in the standard "Ennin's Journey to the West," and since a "red mountain" deity did not exist in China at that time, it seems likely that the new deity was created against the background of conflict between the Tendai sect's two branches, the "mountain" branch (with headquarters at Mt. Hiei's Enryakuji) and the "temple" branch (headquartered at Miidera [Onjōji]). Namely, since Onjōji already had its own tutelary deity Shinra Myōjin, Mt. Hiei's temple Enryakuji responded by adopting the tutelary Sekizan Myōjin .

According to current research, the existence of the temple Sekizan Zen'in can be dated from the latter half of the tenth century. Most images of Sekizan Myōjin depict him as attired in red Chinese costume or cloak, with three-peaked crown and holding bow and arrow. From the medieval period on, the deity's Buddhist counterpart or "essence" (honji; see honji suijaku) was identified as the boddhisattva Jizō (Sk. Kstigarbha), and a process of assimilation occurred whereby he became identified as well with the deities Taizan Fukun (a Chinese tutelary of human destiny), Mutō Tenjin (a deity of pestilence identified with Susanoo), and Gozu Tennō. In contrast to the shrine Hiyoshi Taisha which guarded Mt. Hiei's eastern flank, Sekizan Myōjin was worshiped as a guardian of the mountain's western flank. Sekizan Myōjin was also venerated as tutelary of Injō Nembutsu (a school of nenbutsu "singing"), and was also later adopted as one of the cult of sanjūbanshin ("thirty guardian kami"). At present, Sekizan Myōjin is enshrined at the Sekizan Zen'in within the grounds of the Shūgakuin Detached Palace in Kyoto.
source : Kadoya Atsushi - Kokugakuin 2005





赤山ハ支那ニ太山府君ト称ス今叡山ノ西ノ麓ニアリ
本地地蔵




Taizan-ō, 泰山王 King of Hell, Judge in the 7th week, 49th day 七七日49日


- quote
Taizan Fukun - たいざん‐ふくん【泰山府君】 / 泰山王 Taizanoo
Taizan Fukun wird oft zusammen mit Emma als Paar neben einem Jizo Bosatsu dargestellt. In der wallenden Tracht eines chinesischen Richters der Sung-Zeit.
Meist sitzende Statuen mit furchterregendem Gesichtsausdruck. Er hält in der Hand ein Holzszepter mit zwei Köpfen auf einem Lotusblatt (jintoojoo, nintoojoo).

. 10 Höllenkönige (Jûô, juuoo, juo 十王) .
Gabi Greve


. Abe no Seimei 阿倍晴明 .
and 陰陽道 Onmyodo - The Way of Yin and Yang


. Matarajin, Matara-Shin 摩多羅神 and 新羅明神 Shinra Myojin .
Matarajin is a deity that was introduced to Japan from China by Ennin , Jikaku Daishi Ennin 慈覚大師仁円 as a protector deity of the Amida Sutra (Amida kyoo 阿弥陀経). Some say he is also the secretary of Emma, the main deity of the Buddhist Hell.
The Korean Connection - Shinra, the Japanese version of Silla, the Korean Kingdom.



- quote
Shinra Myōjin
One of the "protectors of the dharma" (gohō;) in the Tendai sect of Buddhism, and tutelary of the famous temple Onjōji (Miidera) in Ōmi, Shiga Prefecture. According to legend, during the return of Enchin (Chishō Daishi) from China, a deity called Shinra Myōjin appeared onboard the ship in the form of an old man and vowed to protect the Buddha Dharma. After Enchin returned to Japan, the deity appeared again and led Enchin to Onjōji. Thereafter, leadership of the temple passed to Enchin from the earlier intendant priest Kyōtai. Enchin then had a shrine built to the north of the temple, where he enshrined Shinra Myōjin.

This tradition is first recounted in the Onjōji ryūge-e engi, a legendary history compiled in 1062, but the deity had already been given an official rank (shinkai) in 971, making it evident that veneration of the deity preceded that date.

The deity is most frequently portrayed iconographically as an old man wearing Chinese robes and headpiece, and holding a sutra scroll and scepter. The wooden, seated image of Shinra Myōjin possessed by Onjōji (classified as a national treasure) is a masterpiece of Japanese combinatory religious art. The Mii Mandala, called "three treasures of the original essence" portrays Shinra Myōjin together with the other three deities Mio Myōjin, Sannō Gongen, and Kifudō surrounding the bodhisattva Maitreya (Miroku); this mandala was used in important Buddhist rites at the temple Onjōji.

From the medieval period, the honji (original essence; see honji suijaku) of Shinra Myōjin was identified variously as Monju Bosatsu (Skt. Bodhisattva Manjushri) or Fudō Myōō (Skt. Acala Vidyaraja), and he was frequently merged with other deities like Susano no mikoto, Gozu Tennō, and the "dragon king" Sagara Ryūō.
Shinra Myōjin is still enshrined at the Shinra Zenjindō north of Onjōji.
- source : Kadoya Atsushi, Kokugakuin 2005

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Sanjuubanshin 三十番神 30 personal protector deities
25 山城 赤山   赤山大明神(せきざん) Sekizan

- 三十番神 30 personal protector deities -





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禅院の子も菓子貰ふ冬至かな
Zen-In no kodomo kashi morau tooji kana

the children at Zen-In
all get some sweets
at the winter solstice . . .


Kuroyanagi Shooha 黒柳召波 Kuroyanagi Shoha (1727-1771)


. Winter solstice, tooji 冬至 .


禅院のかた餅さげし廊下かな
会津八一

禅院のあつけらかんと冬支度
中川宋淵

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. Pilgrimages to Fudo Temples 不動明王巡礼
Fudo Myo-O Junrei - Fudo Pilgrims - INTRODUCTION .



. Japan - Shrines and Temples - ABC .


[ . BACK to DARUMA MUSEUM . TOP . ]
[ . BACK to WORLDKIGO . TOP . ]

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2014/02/08

Hoko-Ji Hamamatsu

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- - - - - Hanzobo Tengu, see below
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Hookooji、Hōkō-ji 方広寺 Hoko-Ji

静岡県引佐町 臨済宗方広寺派本山 Zen temple Rinzai Sect
1577-1 Inasachō Okuyama, Kita-ku, Hamamatsu-shi, Shizuoka



- quote
Shinnozan 深奥山 Hoko-ji 方廣寺
Hoko-ji, located deep in the mountains of western Shizuoka Prefecture north of the city of Hamamatsu, is the head temple of the Hoko-ji branch of Rinzai Zen, with approximately 170 associated temples. It was established in 1371 by the regional lord, Okuyama Rokuro Jiro Tomofuji 奥山六郎次郎朝藤, who invited as founding abbot Mumon Gensen 無文元選 (1323–1390), a son of Emperor Go-Daigo 後醍醐 (r. 1319–1339).

Gensen had become a monk at Kennin-ji and trained under the masters Kao Sonen 可翁宗然 (d. 1345) and Sesson Yubai 雪村友梅 (1290–1346). In 1343 he went to China, where he practiced under the master Gumei Zhengyou 古梅正友 (1285–1352). After receiving the Dharma Seal of the master he traveled further in China, residing for a time at Tiantaishan 天台山. In 1350 Mumon returned to Japan and did further practice in the mountains near Shizuoka, where Okuyama Rokuro Jiro Tomofuji studied Zen under him.

Among Hoko-ji’s notable buildings is the Hanzobo Daigongen 半僧坊大權権現. The Hanzobo Daigongen was built in honor of a deity that is said to have appeared to Mumon Gensen when his ship encountered a storm on the way back from China. The deity, vowing that he would protect Mumon so that he could return to Japan to teach the Dharma, guided the captain and helped the ship survive the storm. Later, after Mumon had become priest of Hoko-ji, the deity appeared again and asked to study Zen. He was dressed partly as a monk and partly as a layman, so the master called him Hanzobo 半僧坊, “Half-monk".

Another notable structure is the Shichison Bosatsudo 七尊菩薩堂 (Important Cultural Property), a shrine built in 1401 that honors seven Shinto deities and Buddhist bodhisattvas. Hoko-ji is also known for its stone images of the Five Hundred Arhats (the five hundred enlightened disciples of Shakyamuni Buddha), located at various places around the temple grounds, including atop a stone bridge.
- source : zen.rinnou.net/head_temples


石橋と五百羅漢 Stone bridge and 500 Arhats



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These statues have become important national treasures in 2014.



Shaka Nyorai in the middle (104 cm)
Monju Bosatsu on the left (57 cm)
Fugen Bosatsu on the right (56 cm)


- Homepage of the temple

- source : www.houkouji.or.jp


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. Tengupedia - 天狗ペディア - Tengu ABC-List .

Hanzooboo 半僧坊 the Tengu Hanzobo, Hanzo-Bo  
遠州奥山半僧坊 Enshu Okuyama Hanzo-Bo


His grave is at the temple Hoko-Ji. Once there was a fire in the back of the temple compound, but it stopped just short of his grave.
Thus he has saved the temple buildings many times from fire destruction.
(坊 BO can mean a building or be used as the name of a priest or Tengu.)




半僧坊祭り - Hanzobo Festival  





Amulets to avoid evil, fire, diaster, be safe at sea - and many more
厄難消除、海上安全、火災消除、所願満足 - 等

- source : hansoubou.com


Yearly Festivals
- source : hansoubou.com/gyoji
静岡県浜松市北区引佐町奥山1577-1

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Mumon Gensen (1323 - 1390)

- quote
Life is like a cloud of mist emerging from a mountain cave
and death a floating moon in its celestial course.
If you think too much about the meaning they may have
you'll be bound forever like an ass to a stake.

Words cannot describe everything.
The heart’s message cannot be delivered in words.
If one receives words literally, he will be lost.
If he tries to explain with words,
he will not attain enlightenment in this life.

- source : www.greatthoughtstreasury.com


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枇杷の実の青々として半僧坊
biwa no mi no aoao to shite Hanzooboo

the loquat fruit
are so green
at Hanzobo sanctuary

Tr. Gabi Greve


. Kawasaki Tenkoo 川崎展宏 Kawasaki Tenko .

. biwa びわ 枇杷 loquat .


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Kanagawa, 鎌倉 Kamakura - 半僧坊 Hanzobo / Hansōbō Shrine / Hansobo

In the compound of temple 建長寺 Kencho-Ji, on top of the mountain.
There are many tengu statues on the way up there.
He is a protector of fires and brings good luck.




ema 絵馬 votive tablet




- reference : kamakura hanzobo -

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. Hōkō-ji 方広寺 Hoko-Ji, Kyoto .
Kyoto Daibutsu no Nanafushigi 京都大仏の七不思議

. Japan - Shrines and Temples - ABC .


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2013/11/20

kaisan temple founder

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kaisan 開山 temple founder

- quote
Kaisan (開山) is a Japanese term used in reference to the founder of a school of Buddhism or the founding abbot of a Zen monastery, literally meaning "mountain founder" or "to open a mountain." Ch'an monasteries of China and Japan have traditionally been built in mountainous regions, with the name of whatever mountain it has been built upon then fixed upon the monastery as well as the founding abbot.
© More in the WIKIPEDIA !


- quote
A kaisandoo (開山堂, kaisan-dō), also termed the Founder's Hall,
is a temple structure in a Japanese Buddhist monastery complex or other temple where an image (or images) of the founding abbot and other significant teachers and Buddha ancestors are kept, along with a memorial slab (J. ihai). Sometimes also referred to as the Patriarch Hall (J. soshido) or Reflection Hall (J. Eishitsu), this building holds memorial services yearly on the anniversary of the death of the founding abbot.

The largest Founder's Hall in Japan is the Goei-dō (御影堂) in front of the Higashi Hongwanji (Hongan-ji) Temple in Kyoto, Japan, one of two head temples of the Jōdo Shinshū sect of Buddhism.
© More in the WIKIPEDIA !




- source : www.myoshinji.or.jp
Myooshinji 妙心寺 Myoshin-Ji - Kyoto


mieidoo 御影堂 Miei-do "Honorable Shadow Hall", founder's hall
with the image of the originator
hall dedicated to the founder, "Reflection Hall"

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- quote
kaisandou 開山堂 kaisando
A hall that enshrines a statue, portrait or memorial tablet of the founder of a temple or the founder of a particular Buddhist sect to which the temple belongs. Frequently, the halls are 3x3 bays square but sizes vary. The word kaisan 開山 means founder.
There are other names for these halls depending on the sect and the time of establishment, but the usual term at Zen sect temples is kaisandou. Temples of Joudo 浄土 or Joudoshin 浄土真 sects, often call these halls *mieidou 御影堂 Miei-Do.
In the Shingon 真言 sect, the hall is called *daishidou 大師堂 Daishi-Do after the founder *Kuukai 空海 (774-835), who was posthumonsly given the name *Kobo Daishi 弘法大師 in 921. Other names used instead of kaisandou are *soshidou 祖師堂 Soshi-Do, meaning a hall dedicated to the founder of the sect, for example that at Manpukuji 萬福寺 (1669) in Kyoto, shidou 祀堂 Shi-Do and haidou 牌堂 Hai-Do. There was a great proliferation of founder's halls during the Kamakura period.
- source and more : JAANUS


Some temples are established by direct orders from an Emperor (chokugan-ji).
When an emperor decided to have a temple built with a certain vow to the deities, he usually entrusted a high priest with the effort to visit that region and supervise the construction.
The founder of a temple is called kaisan.
. Chokuganji 勅願寺 Chokugan-Ji, "Imperial Temple" .


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. Daitoku-ji Kaisan-Ki 大徳寺開山忌 .
Daitoo Ki 大燈忌(だいとうき)Priest Daito Memorial Day
kigo for late winter - 陰暦十二月二十二日



. Kennin-Ji Kaisan Ki 建仁寺開山忌 .
Eisai Zenji 栄西禅師 (1141-1215)
kigo for late summer


Myooshinji Kaisan Ki 妙心寺開山忌
Kanzan Ki 関山忌(かんざんき)、Musoo Ki 無相忌(むそうき)
Musoo Kokushi 無相大師
kigo for late winter - 陰暦の十二月十二日



. Tooeizan Kaisan Ki 東叡山開山忌 .
Jigen Daishi Ki 慈眼大師忌 - 天海(てんかい) (1536-1643)
kigo for early winter



Toofukuji Kaisan Ki 東福寺開山忌
Shoo-ichi ki 聖一忌, Kokushi ki 国師忌
kigo for early winter - 十一月十六日 - Temple Kofuku-Ji, Higashiyama, Kyoto



. Yugyoo-Ji Kaisan Ki 遊行寺開山忌 .
Saint Ippen (1234 – 1289) 一遍
kigo for spring


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寒月や開山堂の木の間より
kangetsu ya kaisandoo no ki no ma yori

this cold moon -
from among the trees
of the founder's hall


. Yosa Buson 与謝蕪村 in Edo .

kangetsu 寒月(かんげつ)"moon in the cold", moon on a cold night
kigo for late winter


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source : photozou.jp/photo/show/1910526
at temple Hoounji 法雲寺 Houn-Ji 大宝山 法雲禅寺(黄檗宗) Osaka


蜥蜴出づ開山堂の踏石に
tokage izu kaisandoo no fumi-ishi ni

a lizard comes out
to the stepping stones
of the Founder's Hall


Kashiwara Min-U 柏原眠雨

. tokage izu 蜥蜴出づ(とかげいづ) lizard coming out .
kigo for spring


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2013/04/10

Ten Kings of Hell

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Juu Oo 十王, Juo, Ju-O - 10 Ten Kings of Hell
Ten Yama Kings



source : city.numata.gunma.jp

- Juuoozu 十王図 paintings of the 10 kings - With Jizo Bosatsu in the middle, there are

秦広王・初江王・宋帝王・五官王・閻魔王・変成王・泰山王・平等王・都市王・五道転輪王

Each of these kings has a representative in the Buddhist pantheon
and is responsible for a set of seven days after death:
(Click on each image for more photos.)



Shinkoo oo 秦広王 (不動明王 Fudo Myo-O)
first seven days 初七日(7日目・6日後)



Shokoo oo 初江王 (釈迦如来 Shaka Nyorai)
second seven days 二七日(14日目・13日後)



Sootei oo 宋帝王 (文殊菩薩 Monju Bosatsu)
third seven days 三七日(21日目・20日後)



Gokan oo 五官王 (普賢菩薩 Fugen Bosatsu)
fourth seven days 四七日(28日目・27日後)

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Enma oo - Emma  閻魔王 (地蔵菩薩 Jizo Bosatsu)
fifth seven days 五七日(35日目・34日後)

. Enma, Emma 閻魔天、閻魔王 Yama-raja, King of Hell .


- - - - - Laughing Enma at 西明寺 Saimyo-Ji, Mashiko - - - - -






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Henjoo oo 変成王 (弥勒菩薩 Miroku Bosatsu)
sixth seven days 六七日(42日目・41日後)




. Taizan Fukun 泰山府君 / 太山府君 King of Hell .
Daizan oo 泰山王 Taizan-O (薬師如来 Yakushi Nyorai)
seventh seven days 七七日(49日目・48日後)

(after 49 days, the soul leaves this world and goes to the other world.



Hyoodoo oo 平等王 (観音菩薩 Kannon Bosatsu)
100 days after death 百か日(100日目・99日後)



Toshi oo 都市王 (勢至菩薩 Seishi Bosatsu)
first death aniversary 一周忌(2年目・1年後)



Godoo tenrin oo 五道転輪王 (阿弥陀如来 Amida Nyorai)
third death aniversary 三回忌(3年目・2年後)


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quote
Jū-ō (Juo) 十王 TEN JUDGES OF HELL
The Jū-ō (lit. = 10 kings) concept is based on Chinese Taoism and was introduced to Japan during the Heian Period (794-1185 AD). In Kamakura, it flourished in the 14th century, and seems to be the Buddhist counterpart of the Roman Catholic concept of purgatory, the latter stemming in large part from Dante's Inferno. According to the Juo teachings, a wicked person goes to hell after death while a good person goes to paradise. Those whose fate is not yet certain after their death are subject to weekly trials, during which their deeds while living are determined and classified. They are judged by the Ten Kings (the Juo) in the courts of the netherworld.
source : Mark Schumacher



quote
Ten Courts of Hell in China
The concept of the "Ten Courts of Hell" began after Chinese folk religions were influenced by Buddhism. In Chinese mythology, the Jade Emperor put King Yama in charge of overseeing the affairs of Diyu. There are 12,800 hells located under the earth - eight dark hells, eight cold hells and 84,000 miscellaneous hells located at the edge of the universe.



All will go to Diyu (jigoku 地獄) after death but the period of time one spends in Diyu depends on the severity of the sins he or she has committed, and after receiving due punishment, he or she will eventually be sent for reincarnation. In the meantime, souls will pass from stage to stage at the decision of Yama. Yama also reduced the number of hells to ten. He later divided Diyu into ten courts, each overseen by a "Yama King", while he remained as the sovereign ruler of Diyu.
source : wikipedia



quote- Daoism
Origin of the Yamas of the Ten Hells
The Yamas were also known as the Kings of Hell ( 閰羅王 Yanluo Wang ) or Kings of Souls. Originally, Yama was a Chinese rendering of the Sanskrit word Yanmo or Yan Moluo. In Indian mythical stories, Yama, along with his sister, acted as the ruler of hell where he controlled male souls and his sister dealt with female souls. As the ruler as well as controller of hell, Yama started to become popular in China during the Southern and Northern dynasties. Originally, there was only one Yama. But owing to his increasing functions, he was transformed into five Yamas, assisted by 18 aides.

During the Tang dynasty, it became popular that the Heavenly Emperor issued the designation for Yama and conferred on him the privilege of controlling soldiers at the Five Sacred Mountains, and that hell consisted of ten hells, which were ruled respectively by ten kings. They were known as the Ten Kings of Hell ( 地府十王 Difu Shiwang ). Each of the Ten Kings had his own name as well as title.
Their general title was 'Yamas of the Ten Halls' ( 十殿閰王 Shidian Yanwang ).
source : en.daoinfo.org/wiki

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source : info.pref.fukui.jp/bunka/bunkazai

木造 十王像 - Wooden statues of the 10 kings of hell

Echizen Town 越前市
Important Treasures of Fukui Prefecture - 福井県内の文化財


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. juuoo moode 十王詣(じゅうおうもうで) visiting the 10 Kings of Hell .
kigo for late summer

juuoo mairi 十王詣(じゅうおうまいり)First visit to the 10 kings of hell
kigo for the New Year

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毛虫焼く十王像を見たる後
kemushi yaku juu oo zoo o mitaru ato

burning a hairy caterpillar
after I have seen the statues
of 10 Kings of Hell


Sano Kazue 佐野一恵


. WKD : kemushi 毛虫 hairy caterpillar .


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