Showing posts with label - - - A Introduction. Show all posts
Showing posts with label - - - A Introduction. Show all posts

2017/12/31

Welcome to Paradise !

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Welcome to Gokuraku 極楽 the Buddhist Paradise !

I will try and introduce information about the life of Shakyamuni Buddha
and a glossary of terms, many of them are kigo for Japanese haiku.

Paradise, Heaven 極楽 gokuraku and Hell 地獄  jigoku

ano yo あの世 the other world
haraiso はらいそ paradise (paraiso)
higan 彼岸 the other shore
joodo 浄土 Paradise of Amida
ka no yo かの世 the other world
. meido 冥土 冥途 the other world / yomi 黄泉 "the yellow springs" .
paradaisu パラダイス paradise, Paradies
raise 来世 afterlife, the world to come
rakuen 楽園 paradise, earthly paradise
shigo no sekai 死後の世界 the world after death
takai 他界 to die, to pass into the other world
tengoku 天国 heaven
tenjoo 天上 "up there", heaven

. toogen 桃源 Shangri-La シャングリラ, Arcadia, Eden - Toogenkyoo 桃源郷 fairyland, .
桃源郷 lit. Peach Blossom Valley

. Tokoyo no Kuni 常世国, 常世の国 The Eternal Land (of Shintoism) .
yomi 黄泉 the yellow springs, die Gelben Quellen
yuutopia ユートピア Utopia


And in the limbo toward the other world here are a lot of vengeful spirits, monsters and goblins.

. jigoku 地獄 Buddhist hell - Introduction .
naraku ならく / 奈落 hell, hades

. jigoku no oni 地獄の鬼 demons of the Buddhist hell .


. Pilgrimages in Japan - Introduction .


. - - - Glossary of Terms - - - . - not yet in the ABC index.


Your comments and help are most welcome!

Gabi Greve
GokuRakuAn 極楽庵, Japan



. Gokuraku Joodoo 極楽浄土 Gokuraku Jodo, Paradise in the West of Amida Nyorai .



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- - - - - ABC - Table of Contents - - - - -

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- PPP - / - QQQ - / - RRR - / - SSS - / - TTT -

- UUU - / - VVV - / - WWW - / - XXX - / - YYY - / - ZZZ -


. Reference, LINKS - General Information .


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. Join the Onipedia Demons on facebook .


under construction - please come back!
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2017/12/29

General Information

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General Information and Reference


- - - - - - - - - - Latest Additions - - -

. Darumapedia - Temples and Gokuraku .

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A Tourist Guidebook to Paradise  
GokuRaku no Kankoo Annai 極楽の観光案内 by 西村公朝 Nishimura Kocho



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- - - - - - - - - - External LINKS - - -


Buddhism in Japan - Buddha Statues - an extensive guide

A-TO-Z PHOTO DICTIONARY
source : Mark Schumacher



Buddhist Art News - Japan
News on Buddhist art, architecture, archaeology, music, dance, and academia.
- source : buddhistartnews.wordpress.com




地獄と極楽がわかる本 - to understand hell and heaven
source : futabasha.co.jp

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A Cultural History of Japanese Buddhism
William E. Deal, Brian Ruppert




- quote -
Review by Jonathan Ciliberto
Intended for “upper-level undergraduate and graduate students as well as scholars,” A Cultural History of Japanese Buddhism fills a gap by presenting largely recent work of Japanese and Western scholars on Japanese Buddhism. The authors consider prior books on Buddhist cultural history as largely from Indian and Tibetan viewpoints. The particular presumptions, intellectual models, or even prejudices of such positions (e.g., to view Japanese Buddhism as a distant reflection, or a corruption, of a continental original) are seen as obstacles to an accurate history of Buddhism’s influence and interaction with Japan.

The great value of the book is to direct readers to approaches and theories perhaps overlooked by more general histories of Buddhism. Each chapter includes its own bibliography and notes, making the book useful for study of narrow sections of Japan’s history.

Published in 2015, many summaries of and citations to recent scholarship are incorporated. Although a relatively short volume (~200 pages, absent notes and biolographies), it includes a great deal of purely historical information surrounded by “cultural history,” covering Japan from protohistory to the present. The book includes a character glossary.

Some themes that run through the book are: that Buddhism in Japan was not a monolithic “ism,” and that individual sects were not exclusive of one another but rather interacted in practice and doctrine; the complex interaction of indigenous religion with Buddhism; Buddhist lineages in Japan as the agents of cultural influence (e.g., “lineages had already begun to pursue the possibility of an ultimate deity”).

Many chapters include subsections on women and gender in Japanese Buddhism, including a fascinating section on the link between literary salons “established in women’s circles” and often held within monasteries and creating an environment for “the evolving and intimate connection between monastic Buddhists and their lay supporters” (102-4). More generally, these sections illustrate the important influence of women on Japanese Buddhism throughout its history. The book also devotes substantial attention to religion in Japan in the modern period, a much-needed resource.

One instance of a simplification of Japanese history that the authors seek to correct is the view that Shinto and Buddhism remained largely separate strands. While the doctrine of honji-suijaku is relatively well-known, the book reveals in greater depth the complex interplay between the two religions by reference to the writings of recent (and less-recent) scholars.

Another attempt to reveal subtlety beyond a stock scholarly view concerns (in the Heian period) the “limitations of the ‘rhetoric of decadence’ [that] some scholars attribute to ‘old’ Buddhism”. The authors offer Minamoto no Tamenori’s (d. 1101) Sanbo’e as an attempt “to incorporate other parts of the populace” beyond the aristocracy. This undercuts the claim that “practitioners of the ‘old’ Buddhism were completely unconcerned with those outside their walls” as a cause of the emergence of “religious heroes” (like Kukai and Nichiren) (88-90). (That said, the ongoing theme of Japanese Buddhists, unsatisfied with the quality of teaching in Japan, who sought original texts and more authoritative teachers in China, does support the basis of a kind of “decadent” Buddhism.)

It is important to have a sense of what “cultural history” is, or what it intends to do, before considering the authors’ approach to a history Japanese Buddhism. Given that cultural history includes an extremely wide set of approaches, determining the present authors’ use of it as a method is largely about picking out strands from the mass of possibilities. (One author refers to “the notorious difficulty of organizing the disorderly profusion of intradisciplinary, cross-disciplinary, and varying national-intellectual meanings and understandings of the “culture concept” into anything resembling consensual form” [Geoffrey Eley, “What Is Cultural History?”, New German Critique, No. 65, Cultural History/Cultural Studies, Spring – Summer, 1995, pp. 19-36].)

While the authors don’t set out their approach, generally in the present volume they tend to consider Buddhism in Japan less in terms of its religious or spiritual character or content and more as a generator of social and political forms. Or, rather, it is unspoken that religion was the driving force in developing myriad cultural effects in Japan, but the book doesn’t linger on religion itself, as it does on these effects.

It is unclear whether this approach is based on the position described by the scholar of medieval Japanese Buddhism Bernard Faure when he refers to an “absolute standpoint” as a “contradiction in terms” (Faure, Visions of Power (2000), 9). (Faure is frequently cited in A Cultural History of Japanese Buddhism.) That is: there are no “religious” standpoints motivating individuals, in terms of absolute or ideal concepts, or at least that taking direction from such standpoints is delusional.

Faure’s view (following from Le Goff) is that “literary and artistic works of art (and, in the case of religion, ritual practice) do no represent any eternal, unitary reality, but rather are the products of the imagination of those who produce them” (Faure, 10, emphasis added). A similar view of religion advocates a “History of Religions approach – trying to figure out how and why certain forms of religiosity took shape the way they did instead of assuming that it was religious experience that made religion” (Alan Cole, Fathering Your Father (2009), xi).

Thus, Faure and historians who follow his approach write religious history absent of religion as an internal activity, aimed at self-improvement, transcendental, or altruistic. Or perhaps this approach simply considers individual “religious” experiences too personal, too psychologically opaque, to form the basis of historical inquiry, and thus discards consideration of such experiences as “religious” in nature, and instead consider them in mainly terms of materiality and politics.

The authors of A Cultural History of Japanese Buddhism follow more directly the historian Kuroda Toshio’s sociopolitical functionalist approach. While occasionally offering descriptions of Buddhist practice and doctrine, the book largely focuses on: state-control over and connection with Buddhism in Japan (“Buddhism was firmly controlled by the state” during the early period (66)); art as narrative or purely visual, rather than a function of practice (99); Buddhist practice as a means of gaining influence or power at court, and the claim that “undoubtably” the introduction of esoteric lineages was related to the royal court’s interest in such power(106); that the court drove ritual (“Pivotal organizational and philosophical changes begin to arise in the royal court with the consolidation of the annual court ceremonies” (88, 106)).

Throughout, the authors take pains to connect influential Buddhists with the court: “The Daigoji halls, like those in other major monasteries, primarily housed scions of Fujiwara and Minamoto heritage” (107); “The Shingon lineages, from a very early point, […] had a special connection with the royal line” (108); “the intimate association between Tendai’s Enryakuji (Hiei) and the leading Fujiwaras” (108). Every monk who was a member of a royal family is identified in such a manner.

The author’s de-emphasis on “religious” explanations for religious history in Japan is intended to counterbalance writers who rely too much on such explanations. Citing the notable effect of D.T. Suzuki’s presentation of Zen Buddhism to the West (absurdist, gnomic, iconoclastic), and pointing out that “few Japanese Zen adherents, except those in the modern period and particularly those with access to the writings of Suzuki translated into Japanese” would recognize it, the author’s more social-science approach finds some justification. (146-7).

Performance theory is connected with the authors’ approach. A Cultural History of Japanese Buddhism doesn’t lay any groundwork for the reader as to what the doctrine or technique of applying performance theory are. It is a notoriously amorphous field of inquiry. One description of the approach states that “the performative nature of societies around the world, how events and rituals as well as daily life [are] all governed by a code of performance,” and one sees how this aligns with Deal and Ruppert’s approach in the present volume: religious acts are not generated by authenticity, but rather are ritualized and “for show.” Performance theory is difficult to understand as contributing much to an analysis of history, since all human action is outward, and thus all actions are, in a literal sense, “performed.” The negative application of the theory is applied in the present volume: performance theory supports the strategy of avoiding examination the motivations, hearts, or minds of individual in Japanese Buddhist history.

This is a strategy for writing history, and indicates the above-mentioned scholarly caution, perhaps, but also it tends to paint individuals as acting according to a plan (or with hindsight), rather than by caprice, calling, sincerity, compassion, or irrationality. Perhaps it doesn’t matter, in terms of cultural history, whether or not an effect was caused by religion or some other motivation, but only that the effect did occur.

With regard to Buddhist art, the authors acknowledge – particularly as to poetry – that the “undoubted” motivation for including Buddhist themes was a recognition of the contrast between non-attachment and the “intoxication of those who made use of or found beauty in the linguistic arts” (102). Oddly – although in keeping with the author’s “non-religious” approach to religious art – the idea that such an aesthetic intoxication is meant exactly to advance individuals’ practice (e.g., through visualization) is never mentioned, with respect to poetry or any other art form.
- source : Buddhist Art News -

- reference -

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CLICK for more books !


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BUDDHISM & SHINTŌISM IN JAPAN
A-TO-Z PHOTO DICTIONARY OF JAPANESE RELIGIOUS SCULPTURE & ART

- source : Mark Schumacher



Digital Dictionary of Buddhism - 電子佛教辭典 / Edited by A. Charles Muller
sign in as guest
- source : www.buddhism-dict.ne

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2015/06/10

Four Word Zen Teachings

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Four-word Zen Teachings 四字禅語 yoji zengo

. Koan and Haiku 公案と俳句 .
- Introduction -

- quote
四字禅語集 100 Zen Teachings in Four Words

shooken 正見(しょうけん)
shooyui 正思惟(しょうしゆい) 
shoogo 正語(しょうご)
shoogoo 正業(しょうごう)
shoomyoo 正命(しょうみょう)
shooshoojin 正精進(しょうしょうじん)
shoonen 正念(しょうねん)
shoojoo 正定(しょうじょう)

- - - - -  extensive resource in Japanese
- source : 四字禅語集


Japanese-English Glossary of Zen Terms
Compiled by Gábor Terebess
- source : Terebess Online -

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A55
泥多佛大(どろおおければほとけだいなり)
doro ookereba hotoke dai nari

時々、不思議な意味を持つ言葉に出遭う。この「泥多ければ佛大なり」もその分野に入る言葉である。泥とは煩悩であり、煩悩が多ければそれだけ悟りも大きいと言っている。私達は佛になるのには、煩悩という迷いを持っていてはいけないと理解している。この理解を土台ごとひっくりかえしてしまう言葉である。佛教では、迷いが多いということは、それだけ努力しているのだと考える。自分の欠点に気づくということは、それを直したい自分があるということである。迷いや煩悩がないということは、自分に対しての反省もないのである。私達は物事に失敗したときは、何故失敗したのだろうかと、反省をする。そして「不運」とか「幸運」という言葉にいき当たる。私が失敗したのは不運だった。彼が成功したのは幸運だったという言葉である。しかし、待ってください。
「不運だ」「不幸だ」と嘆いても、人間の都合で勝手に善いものと悪いものに振り分けているのだ。自分を中心とした身勝手な嘆きといえる。結局、「不運」「不幸」も私達自身の心が作り出した「幻影」に過ぎないのである。自分で作り出した「幻影」に腹を立て、イライラしているようである。幻影に惑わされない方法如何なるものかと、考えを進めなければならない。一言で言うと「感謝」という言葉に代表される。血気盛んな青春時代は、自分を中心に世の中が回っていると思っている。社会へ出て、一つ一つ壁にぶち当たり、、挫折しなければ、本当の意味の感謝は理解出来ないであろう。皆のおかげで自分が存在していること、目に見えない「ご縁」に対しても感謝が出来る心を持ちたいものである。

doro ookereba hotoke dai nari
mizu maseba fune takashi

Much mud will make a larger Buddha
with much water your boat will ride high.

The One Taste of Truth: Zen and the Art of Drinking Tea
By William Scott Wilson
Mud and water here symbolize adversity. The more clay or mud, the bigger and more impressive the Buddhist statue will be; as water increases, your boat will ride high above the river bottom. Thus, the more your confusion, the more your despair (if you continue and work hard), the deeper your enlightenment, the more exquisite your skills will be.
- source : www.slideshare.net -


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身心脱落とは坐禅なり
Dropping off body and mind is zazen.



Skeleton Performing Zazen on Waves, Maruyama Okyo
(Daijoji Temple, Hyogo, Japan)

Ōkyo’s “Skeleton”, Not Performing Zazen;
Reflections on the Iconography of the Daijōji’s kyakuden
Beatrice Shoemaker
Ōkyo's "Skeleton" may have been the first anatomically accurate skeleton depicted in a lotus position, but skeletons had a long and bifurcated history in Japanese iconology. Ōkyo's innovative depiction rested on shasei, the realism he adopted from rangaku, Western studies [...]. Until the first officially authorised dissection of a human corpse, performed in Kyoto in 1754 by the physician Yamawaki Tōyō, published as the  Zōshi 蔵志 Anatomical Record in 1759, knowledge of human anatomy had rested exclusively on Chinese medical treatises. [...]
The visual dissonance between the naturalistic skeleton and the traditional, Song inspired waves would have shocked the non-metropolitan viewer, who might not have easy access to Sugita Denpaku's Kaitai Shinsho [another rangaku anatomical work]. Ōkyo effectively uses the latest scientific findings to represent what is left once all that is transient, from human passions to the various processes of aging, disease and decay, have been stripped away.
- source : www.academia.edu -

- reference -

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. Japan - Shrines and Temples - ABC .


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2015/06/08

Pilgrimages in Japan

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Pilgrimages in Japan
- Introduction -

Pilgrimages to a certain number of temples related to a deity are very popular in Japan.

- quote -
RESOURCE GUIDE - JAPANESE PILGRIMS & PILGRIMAGES
In Japan, pilgrimages can be classified into two general types:
(1) multi-site circuits and (2) single-site pilgrimages.
.
Sites Sacred to Kannon Bosatsu in Kamakura
Sites Sacred to Kannon Bosatsu Nationwide
Sites Sacred to Jizō Bosatsu in Kamakura
Sites Sacred to Seven Lucky Deities in Kamakura
Sites Sacred to Amida Nyorai in Kamakura

Mark Schumacher also introduces the equipment for a pilgrim, from the stamp book to the robes, hat and walking stick.
- source : Mark Schumacher

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- - - - - Pilgrimages to Buddhist Deities

Amida Reijo 阿弥陀霊場
- source : http://nippon-reijo.jimdo.com -

. Fudo Myo-O Junrei 不動明王巡礼 - Introduction .

. Jizo Bosatsu 地蔵菩薩 - Introduction .

. Kannon Bosatsu 観音菩薩 . *

. Shichifukujin 七福神 Seven Deities of Good Luck .

. Yakushi Nyorai Pilgrimages 薬師如来霊場 - Introduction .


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. Tokyo - Edo Pilgrimages .
Gofunai 御府内八十八ヶ所霊場 88 Henro Temples in Edo
江戸三十三観音霊場 Pilgrimage to 33 Kannon Temples of Edo
. . . and more


. Shikoku Henro 四国お遍路さん Pilgrims in Shikoku .
Kobo Daishi Kukai 弘法大師 空海
Pilgrimage to 88 temples in honor of Kobo Daishi Kukai


. Zenko-Ji mairi 善光寺参り - Nagano .


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Japanese Buddhist Pilgrimage
Michael Pye



Japanese Buddhist Pilgrimage
explores the ritual practice of “circulatory pilgrimages” – the visiting of many temples in a numbered sequence. Every year, hundreds of thousands of pilgrims travel such temple routes, seeking peace of mind, health and wellbeing for themselves and others as the benefits of such meritorious endeavour. This form of pilgrimage appears to be unique to Japan. The practice began centuries ago and involved visiting 33 temples devoted to the Bodhisattva Kannon, spread widely over western Japan. Soon afterwards the equally famous pilgrimage to 88 temples on Japan’s fourth island of Shikoku came into prominence.

This is the first comprehensive study of all the major and many of the minor routes, The book also examines how the practice of circulatory pilgrimage developed among the shrines and temples for the Seven Gods of Good Fortune, and beyond them to the rather different world of Shintō. The varying significance of the different pilgrimages is also explored. In addition to all the information about the routes, the book includes numerous illustrations and examples of the short Buddhist texts chanted by the pilgrims on their rounds.
- source : .equinoxpub.com/home -


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- - - - - mairi 参り  is usually a pilgrimage to a Shinto shrine.

. Pilgrimage to Kyoto shrines (Kyoo mairi 京参り ) .

Ise Shrine Pilgrimage, O-Ise-Mairi, Ise Mairi 伊勢参り
O-kage mairi お陰参り "Thanks pilgrimages" or "blessing pilgrimages,"
nuke mairi 抜参(ぬけまいり)

Konpira Shrine Pilgrimage, Konpira Mairi 琴平参り


Shinbutsu 神仏霊場
- source : http://nippon-reijo.jimdo.com -

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. Pilgrimage to 22 famous Shrines 名神大社二十二社参拝 .
The shrines are located in Kyoto, Nara, Mie and Osaka.


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Reference

ニッポンの霊場へようこそ - all pilgrimages of Japan
- source : nippon-reijo.jimdo.com -

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. O-Mamori お守り Amulets and Talismans .

. Japan - Shrines and Temples - ABC .


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- - #gokurakupilgrims #pilgrim #pilgrimage -
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2015/02/28

Settsu Henro

[ . BACK to Daruma Museum TOP . ]
. Shikoku Henro Temple List .
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Settsu no Kuni 88 Henro Temples 摂津国八十八ケ所

- quote -
Settsu Province (摂津国 Settsu no kuni) was a province of Japan, which today comprises the eastern part of Hyōgo Prefecture and the northern part of Osaka Prefecture.
It was also referred to as Tsu Province (津国 Tsu no kuni) or Sesshū (摂州).
Osaka and Osaka Castle were the main center of the province.



During the Sengoku period, the Miyoshi clan ruled Settsu and its neighbors, Izumi and Kawachi, until they were conquered by Oda Nobunaga. The provinces were ruled subsequently by Toyotomi Hideyoshi. The regents of Hideyoshi's son soon quarreled, and when Ishida Mitsunari lost the Battle of Sekigahara, the area was given to relatives of Tokugawa Ieyasu. It was from then on divided into several domains, including the Asada Domain.
Sumiyoshi taisha
was designated as the chief Shinto shrine (Ichinomiya 一ノ宮) for the province.
During the Sengoku period
Settsu became the main exporting centre of matchlock firearms to the rest of Japan.
- - - More in the WIKIPEDIA !

under construction
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In former times, the Kinki region was divided into five provinces:
山城 Yamashiro、大和 Yamato、摂津 Settsu、河内 Kawachi and 和泉 Izumi.

The pilgrimage to 88 Henro temples in Settsu was started by Saint Kekkai 月海上人 in the end of the Edo period.
During WW II many temples were burned down and this pilgrimage has become out of reach. But in 1980 it was revived.

Most temples can be reached within one hour from Central Osaka, which makes this pilgrimage a favorite with Henro Pilgrims.

The main statue of each pilgrim temple is different.


- Osaka 大阪市 / 大阪府 -

01 Hoan-Ji 法案寺 - 大阪市中央区島之内 薬師如来 - Yakushi Nyorai
02 Mitsudera 三津寺 - 大阪市中央区心斎橋筋 十一面観音 Juichimen Kannon
03 Wako-Ji 和光寺 - 大阪市西区北堀江 一光三尊阿弥陀如来 Amida Nyorai
04 Riyotoku-In 了徳院 - 大阪市福島区鷺洲 准胝観音 Juntei Kannon
05 Jimyo-In 持明院 - 大阪市福島区鷺洲 厄除弘法大師
06 Taiyu-Ji 太融寺 - 大阪市北区太融寺町 千手千眼観音 Senju Kannon
07 Fukko-Ji 富光寺 - 大阪市淀川区加島 阿弥陀如来 Amida Nyorai
08 . Fudo-Ji 不動寺 - Toyonaka 豊中 - 五大力不動明王 Godairiki Fudo Myo-O .
09 . Kokubun-Ji 国分寺 - 薬師如来 Yakushi Nyorai .

10 Hoju-In 寶珠院 - 大阪市北区与力町 大日如来 Dainichi Nyorai
11 . Zenpuku-Ji 善福寺 - 弘法大師 Kobo Daishi . Dondoro Daishi .
12 Kotoku-Ji 興徳寺 - 大阪市天王寺区餌差町 薬師如来 Yakushi Nyorai
13 Dainichi-Ji 大日寺 - 大阪市城東区鴨野東 子安大日如来 Koyasu Dainichi Nyorai
14 Rokudai-In 六大院 - 大阪市天王寺区餌差町 大聖不動明王 Fudo Myo-O
15 Enju-An 圓珠庵 - 大阪市天王寺区空清町 十一面観音 Juichimen Kannon
16 Kannon-Ji 観音寺 - 大阪市天王寺区城南寺町 十一面観音 Juichimen Kannon
17 Shoyu-Ji 正祐寺 - 大阪市天王寺区上本町 大日如来 Dainichi Nyorai
18 Sokei-In 宗恵院 - 大阪市天王寺区生玉前町 大日如来 Dainichi Nyorai
19 Toji-Ji 藤次寺 - 大阪市天王寺区生玉町 宝生如来 Hosho Nyorai

20 Jisho-In 自性院 - 大阪市中央区寺 聖観音 Kannon Bosatsu
21 Hoon-In 報恩院 - 大阪市中央区高津 不動明王 Fudo Myo-O
22 Shimyo-In 持明院 - 大阪市天王寺区生玉町 大日如来 Dainichi Nyorai
23 Shoren-Ji 青蓮寺 - 大阪市天王寺区生玉寺町 金剛界大日如来 Dainichi Nyorai
24 Shinko-In 真光院 - 大阪市天王寺区夕陽丘町 阿弥陀如来 Amida Nyorai
25 . Shitenno-Ji 四天王寺 - 救世観音 Kuse Kannon .
26 Kiyomizudera 清水寺 - 大阪市天王寺区伶人町 十一面観音 Juichimen Kannon
27 Koya-Ji 高野寺 - 大阪市西区土佐堀 厄除弘法大師 Kobo Daishi
28 Naniwa-Ji 浪速寺 - 大阪市浪速区恵比寿西 毘沙門天 Bishamonten
29 . Daijooboo 大乗坊 Daijo-Bo . 毘沙門天 Bishamonten

30 Chikurin-Ji 竹林寺 - 大阪市中央区難波 阿弥陀如来 Amida Nyorai
31 Jizo-In 地蔵院 - 大阪市大正区三軒家東 地蔵菩薩 Jizo Bosatsu
32 . Shooenji 正圓寺 Shoen-Ji - 大聖歓喜天 Kankiten / Kangiten .
- and Mizukake Fudo Myo-O
33 Shaka-In 釈迦院 - 大阪市港区築港 弘法大師 Kobo Daishi
34 Nishi no Bo 西之坊 - 大阪市住吉区上住吉 地蔵菩薩 Jizo Bosatsu
35 Shogon Jodo-Ji 荘厳浄土寺 - 大阪市住吉区帝塚山東 不動明王 Fudo Myo-O
36 Yakushi-Ji 薬師寺 - 大阪市住吉区苅田 薬師瑠璃光如来 Yakushi Nyorai
37 Nyogan-Ji 如願寺 - 大阪市平野区喜連 聖観音 Kannon Bosatsu
38 Choho-Ji 長寶寺 - 大阪市平野区平野本町 十一面観音 Juichimen Kannon
39 Senko-Ji 全興寺 - 大阪市平野区平野本町 薬師瑠璃光如来 Yakushi Nyorai


- stamp book -

40 Horaku-Ji 法楽寺 - 大阪市東住吉区山坂 不動明王 Fudo Myo-O
41 Kyozen-Ji 京善寺 -大阪市東住吉区桑津 不動明王 Fudo Myo-O
42 Joko Enman-Ji 常光圓満寺 - 大阪府吹田市元町 聖観音 Kannon Bosatsu
43 Ensho-Ji 圓照寺 - 大阪府吹田市山田東 千手観音 Senju Kannon
44 Saidera 佐井寺 -大阪府吹田市佐井寺 薬師瑠璃光如来 Yakushi Nyorai
45 Kongo-In 金剛院 - 大阪府摂津市千里丘 薬師如来 Yakushi Nyorai
46 Renge-Ji 蓮花寺 - 大阪府茨木市天王 薬師瑠璃光如来 Yakushi Nyorai
47 Soji-Ji 総持寺 - 大阪府茨木市総持寺 千手観音 Senju Kannon
48 Jizo-In 地蔵院 - 大阪府高槻市真上町 延命地蔵菩薩 Enmei Jizo Bosatsu
49 . Ryozen-Ji 霊山寺 - 一言不動尊 Hitokoto Fudo Myo-O .


50 Daimon-Ji 大門寺 - 大阪府茨木市大字大門寺 如意輪観音 Kannon Bosatsu
51 Shinryu-Ji 真龍寺 - 大阪府茨木市東福井 釈迦牟尼如来 Shaka Nyorai
52 Taishaku-Ji 帝釈寺 - 大阪府箕面市粟生外院 帝釈天 Taishakuten
53 Zenpuku-Ji 善福寺 - 大阪府箕面市粟生間谷西 十一面観音 Juichimen Kannon
54 Katsuo-Ji 勝尾寺 - 大阪府箕面市粟生間谷 十一面観音 Juichimen Kannon
55 Ryuan-Ji 瀧安寺 - 大阪府箕面市箕面公園 弁財天 Benzaiten, Benten
56 Hoju-In 宝珠院 - 大阪府箕面市如意谷 如意輪観音 Kannon Bosatsu
57 Shaka-In 釋迦院 - 大阪府池田市鉢塚 釈迦如来 Shaka Nyorai
58 Ichijo-In 一乗院 - 大阪府池田市鉢塚 聖観音 Kannon Bosatsu
59 Jofuku-Ji 常福寺 - 大阪府池田市神田 千手観音 Senju Kannon

- Hyogo 兵庫県 -

60 Kongo-In 金剛院 - 兵庫県伊丹市宮ノ前 大日如来 Dainichi Nyorai
61 Anraku-In 安楽院 - 兵庫県伊丹市千僧 大日如来 Dainichi Nyorai
62 Ninyo-Ji 昆陽寺 - 兵庫県伊丹市寺本 薬師瑠璃光如来 Yakushi Nyorai
63 Daiku-Ji 大空寺 - 兵庫県伊丹市野間字来福地 延命地蔵 Enmei Jizo Bosatsu
64 Joko-Ji 浄光寺 - 兵庫県尼崎市常光寺 聖観音 Kannon Bosatsu
65 Daikaku-Ji 大覚寺 - 兵庫県尼崎市寺町 千手観音 Senju Kannon
66 Koho-Ji 高法寺 - Osaka 大阪府池田市綾羽 十一面観音 Juichimen Kannon
67 Kyuan-Ji 久安寺 - Osaka 大阪府池田市伏尾町 千手観音 Senju Kannon
68 Mangan-Ji 満願寺 - Hyogo 兵庫県川西市満願寺 千手観音 Senju Kannon
69 Nakayamadera 中山寺 Daishido (大師堂) - 兵庫県宝塚市中山寺 十一面観音 Juichimen Kannon

70 Nakayamadera 中山寺 Nokyojo (納経所) - 兵庫県宝塚市中山寺 十一面観音 Juichimen Kannon
71 Nakayamadera 中山寺 Oku no In (奥之院) - 兵庫県宝塚市中山寺 十一面観音 Juichimen Kannon
72 Seicho-Ji 清澄寺 - 兵庫県宝塚市米谷清 大日如来・三宝荒神 Dainichi Nyorai / Kiyoshi Kojin 清荒神
73 Heirin-Ji 平林寺 - 兵庫県宝塚市社町 釈迦如来 Shaka Nyorai
74 Kinryu-Ji 金龍寺 - 兵庫県宝塚市鹿塩 得自性清浄法性如来 Nyorai
75 Kanno-Ji 神呪寺 - 兵庫県西宮市甲山町 如意輪融通観音 Kannon Bosatsu
76 Toko-Ji 東光寺 Mondoyakujin (門戸厄神) - 兵庫県西宮市門戸西町 薬師如来 Yakushi Nyorai
77 Hoshin-Ji 法心寺 - 兵庫県西宮市高木西町 十一面観音 Juichimen Kannon
78 Dainichi-Ji 大日寺 - 兵庫県西宮市高木東町 大日如来 Dainichi Nyorai
79 Enman-Ji 圓満寺 Nishinomiya, Naritasan(西宮成田山) - 兵庫県西宮市社家町 薬師瑠璃光如来 Yakushi Nyorai

80 . Tenjo-Ji 天上寺 / Maya san Tenjooji 摩耶山天上寺 .
81 Shotoku-In 聖徳院 - 神戸市中央区宮本通 弘法大師 Kobo Daishi
82 Dairyu-Ji 大龍寺 - 神戸市中央区再度山 聖如意輪観音 Kannon Bosatsu
83 Shinpuku-Ji 真福寺 - 神戸市兵庫区下沢通 阿弥陀如来 Amida Nyorai
84 Konko-Ji 金光寺 - 神戸市兵庫区西仲町 薬師瑠璃光如来 Yakushi Nyorai
85 Jofuku-Ji 常福寺 - 神戸市長田区大谷町 延命地蔵 Enmei Jizo Bosatsu
86 Myoho-Ji 妙法寺 - 神戸市須磨区妙法寺 毘沙門天 Bishamonten
87 Shofuku-Ji 勝福寺 - 神戸市須磨区大手町 聖観音 Kannon Bosatsu
88 . Sumadera 須磨寺 - . 神戸市須磨区須磨寺町 聖観音 Kannon Bosatsu



. Settsu 摂津 the temples with Fudo Myo-O .

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Links to most temples
- source : www.geocities.co.jp/SilkRoad

Wikipedia links to the temples
摂津国八十八箇所(せっつこくはちじゅうはちかしょ) 霊場一覧
- source : wikipedia

Links to most temples
- source : www.houshuin.com/settu88

Link to the shuin 朱印
- source : gosyuinnotabi.web.

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- Other deities from Settsu -

. Sanju Banjin 三十番神 30 Protector Deities .
3 摂津 - Hirota Daimyojin  広田大明神    賀茂


. Arima Hot Spring - Legends from Gyoki .

. Tsunashiki Tenmangu .
near temple Sumadera in Suma-Ura Park. Kobe
綱敷天満宮 (神戸市) - 兵庫県神戸市須磨区鎮座


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. Kobo Daishi Kukai 弘法大師 空海 . (774 - 835) .

. Narita Fudo 成田不動尊 .
Temple Shinshooji 新勝寺 Shinsho-Ji

. Fudo Myo-O at Mount Koyasan 高野山の明王像 .


. Pilgrimages to Fudo Temples 不動明王巡礼
Fudo Myo-O Junrei - Introduction .
 

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. O-Mamori お守り Amulets and talismans from Japan . 

. Japanese Temples - ABC list - .

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2013/04/11

Hachi Kan Jigoku Cold Hells

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Hachi Kan Jigoku, Hachikan Jigoku, Hakkan Jigoku 八寒地獄 Eight Cold Hells
Eight Frozen Hells

There are also
. Hachi Netsu Jigoku 八熱地獄 Eight Hot Hells .


The Eight Cold Hells lie under the continent of Jambudvipa next to the eight hot hells.



source : Jigoku Nyumon



Abuda 頞部陀(あぶだ)地獄 Arbuda

Nirabuta 刺部陀(にらぶた)地獄 Nirarbuda

Atada 頞听陀(あただ)地獄 Atata

Kakaba 臛臛婆(かかば)地獄 Hahava

Kokoba 虎々婆(ここば)地獄 Huhuva

Upara, Ubara 嗢鉢羅(うばら)地獄 Utpala

Hadoma - Guren 鉢特摩(はどま)地獄 Padma

Maka Hadoma 摩訶鉢特摩(まかはどま)地獄 Mahapadma


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- - - - - 8 Cold Narakas
. naraku ならく / 奈落 Naraka hell, hades .


under construction
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- - - - - H A I K U - - - - -



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Hachi Dai Jigoku 八大地獄 Eight Great Hells
. Hachi Netsu Jigoku 八熱地獄 Eight Hot Hells .

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2013/04/10

Kotowaza proverbs

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. kotowaza 諺 / ことわざ idioms, sayings, proverbs .
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kotowaza ことわざ - 諺 proverbs and sayings


some deal with paradise, some with hell.

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gokuraku no kotowaza 極楽のことわざ idioms about Paradise

kiite gokuraku mite jigoku 聞いて極楽見て地獄
The story sounds like Paradise, but in reality it is hell.

Fame is a liar.(世評は嘘つき)
Imagination goes a long way.(聞くと見るとは大違い)
A paradise on hearsay, a hell at sight.(聞いた話は天国で、見たものは地獄だ)


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uso o tsuku to Enma-O ni shita o nukareru 嘘をつくと閻魔様に舌を抜かれる
嘘を言うと閻魔様に舌を抜かれる
If you tell a lie, King Emma of Hell will pull your tongue out.


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uso tsuitara hari senbon nomasu  うそついたらハリセンボン飲ます
If you tell a lie, you have to drink 1000 needles.


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warusa o shitara jigoku ni ochiru 悪さをしたら地獄に落ちるぞ
If you behave badly, you will fall into hell.

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gongo doodan 言語道断 atrocious, outrageous
『維摩経ゆいまきょう』阿閦仏品あしゅくぶつぼん
「言語」は言葉に出して表すこと。
「道断」は言うことが断たれること。「道」は口で言うこと。また、「言語の道が断たれる」意ともいう。

Japanese Buddhist phrase.It means
“the path of words has been cut.”

“beyond words”"I am dumbstruck”


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. kotowaza 諺 / ことわざ idioms, sayings, proverbs .

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2013/04/01

Glossary of Terms

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Glossary of Terms

Terms about Gokuraku and Jigoku to be explored in more detail later.



source : www.city.ohtawara.tochigi.jp

Shaka Nehanzu 釈迦涅槃図 Buddha entering Nirvana

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gokuraku tonbo 極楽とんぼ "Heavenly Dragonfly" Title of a novel by 里見弴
and later a comedian group © More in the WIKIPEDIA !


Saga Dai Nenbutsu
- 嵯峨大念仏狂言 -


shoojigoku 小地獄 "small hell"



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