2017/12/31

Welcome to Paradise !

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Welcome to Gokuraku 極楽 the Buddhist Paradise !

I will try and introduce information about the life of Shakyamuni Buddha
and a glossary of terms, many of them are kigo for Japanese haiku.

Paradise, Heaven 極楽 gokuraku and Hell 地獄  jigoku

ano yo あの世 the other world
haraiso はらいそ paradise (paraiso)
higan 彼岸 the other shore
joodo 浄土 Paradise of Amida
ka no yo かの世 the other world
. meido 冥土 冥途 the other world / yomi 黄泉 "the yellow springs" .
paradaisu パラダイス paradise, Paradies
raise 来世 afterlife, the world to come
rakuen 楽園 paradise, earthly paradise
shigo no sekai 死後の世界 the world after death
takai 他界 to die, to pass into the other world
tengoku 天国 heaven
tenjoo 天上 "up there", heaven

. toogen 桃源 Shangri-La シャングリラ, Arcadia, Eden - Toogenkyoo 桃源郷 fairyland, .
桃源郷 lit. Peach Blossom Valley

. Tokoyo no Kuni 常世国, 常世の国 The Eternal Land (of Shintoism) .
yomi 黄泉 the yellow springs, die Gelben Quellen
yuutopia ユートピア Utopia


And in the limbo toward the other world here are a lot of vengeful spirits, monsters and goblins.


jigoku 地獄 Buddhist hell - Introduction
. naraku ならく / 奈落 hell, hades .


. Pilgrimages in Japan - Introduction .


. - - - Glossary of Terms - - - . - not yet in the ABC index.



Your comments and help are most welcome!

Gabi Greve
GokuRakuAn 極楽庵, Japan


. Gokuraku Joodoo 極楽浄土 Gokuraku Jodo, Paradise in the West of Amida Nyorai .






. Reference, LINKS - General Information .


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. Join the Kannon Bosatsu Gallery on facebook .

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2017/12/29

General Information

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General Information and Reference


- - - - - - - - - - Latest Additions - - -

. Darumapedia - Temples and Gokuraku .

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A Tourist Guidebook to Paradise  
GokuRaku no Kankoo Annai 極楽の観光案内 by 西村公朝 Nishimura Kocho



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- - - - - - - - - - External LINKS - - -


Buddhism in Japan - Buddha Statues - an extensive guide

A-TO-Z PHOTO DICTIONARY
source : Mark Schumacher



Buddhist Art News - Japan
News on Buddhist art, architecture, archaeology, music, dance, and academia.
- source : buddhistartnews.wordpress.com




地獄と極楽がわかる本 - to understand hell and heaven
source : futabasha.co.jp

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A Cultural History of Japanese Buddhism
William E. Deal, Brian Ruppert




- quote -
Review by Jonathan Ciliberto
Intended for “upper-level undergraduate and graduate students as well as scholars,” A Cultural History of Japanese Buddhism fills a gap by presenting largely recent work of Japanese and Western scholars on Japanese Buddhism. The authors consider prior books on Buddhist cultural history as largely from Indian and Tibetan viewpoints. The particular presumptions, intellectual models, or even prejudices of such positions (e.g., to view Japanese Buddhism as a distant reflection, or a corruption, of a continental original) are seen as obstacles to an accurate history of Buddhism’s influence and interaction with Japan.

The great value of the book is to direct readers to approaches and theories perhaps overlooked by more general histories of Buddhism. Each chapter includes its own bibliography and notes, making the book useful for study of narrow sections of Japan’s history.

Published in 2015, many summaries of and citations to recent scholarship are incorporated. Although a relatively short volume (~200 pages, absent notes and biolographies), it includes a great deal of purely historical information surrounded by “cultural history,” covering Japan from protohistory to the present. The book includes a character glossary.

Some themes that run through the book are: that Buddhism in Japan was not a monolithic “ism,” and that individual sects were not exclusive of one another but rather interacted in practice and doctrine; the complex interaction of indigenous religion with Buddhism; Buddhist lineages in Japan as the agents of cultural influence (e.g., “lineages had already begun to pursue the possibility of an ultimate deity”).

Many chapters include subsections on women and gender in Japanese Buddhism, including a fascinating section on the link between literary salons “established in women’s circles” and often held within monasteries and creating an environment for “the evolving and intimate connection between monastic Buddhists and their lay supporters” (102-4). More generally, these sections illustrate the important influence of women on Japanese Buddhism throughout its history. The book also devotes substantial attention to religion in Japan in the modern period, a much-needed resource.

One instance of a simplification of Japanese history that the authors seek to correct is the view that Shinto and Buddhism remained largely separate strands. While the doctrine of honji-suijaku is relatively well-known, the book reveals in greater depth the complex interplay between the two religions by reference to the writings of recent (and less-recent) scholars.

Another attempt to reveal subtlety beyond a stock scholarly view concerns (in the Heian period) the “limitations of the ‘rhetoric of decadence’ [that] some scholars attribute to ‘old’ Buddhism”. The authors offer Minamoto no Tamenori’s (d. 1101) Sanbo’e as an attempt “to incorporate other parts of the populace” beyond the aristocracy. This undercuts the claim that “practitioners of the ‘old’ Buddhism were completely unconcerned with those outside their walls” as a cause of the emergence of “religious heroes” (like Kukai and Nichiren) (88-90). (That said, the ongoing theme of Japanese Buddhists, unsatisfied with the quality of teaching in Japan, who sought original texts and more authoritative teachers in China, does support the basis of a kind of “decadent” Buddhism.)

It is important to have a sense of what “cultural history” is, or what it intends to do, before considering the authors’ approach to a history Japanese Buddhism. Given that cultural history includes an extremely wide set of approaches, determining the present authors’ use of it as a method is largely about picking out strands from the mass of possibilities. (One author refers to “the notorious difficulty of organizing the disorderly profusion of intradisciplinary, cross-disciplinary, and varying national-intellectual meanings and understandings of the “culture concept” into anything resembling consensual form” [Geoffrey Eley, “What Is Cultural History?”, New German Critique, No. 65, Cultural History/Cultural Studies, Spring – Summer, 1995, pp. 19-36].)

While the authors don’t set out their approach, generally in the present volume they tend to consider Buddhism in Japan less in terms of its religious or spiritual character or content and more as a generator of social and political forms. Or, rather, it is unspoken that religion was the driving force in developing myriad cultural effects in Japan, but the book doesn’t linger on religion itself, as it does on these effects.

It is unclear whether this approach is based on the position described by the scholar of medieval Japanese Buddhism Bernard Faure when he refers to an “absolute standpoint” as a “contradiction in terms” (Faure, Visions of Power (2000), 9). (Faure is frequently cited in A Cultural History of Japanese Buddhism.) That is: there are no “religious” standpoints motivating individuals, in terms of absolute or ideal concepts, or at least that taking direction from such standpoints is delusional.

Faure’s view (following from Le Goff) is that “literary and artistic works of art (and, in the case of religion, ritual practice) do no represent any eternal, unitary reality, but rather are the products of the imagination of those who produce them” (Faure, 10, emphasis added). A similar view of religion advocates a “History of Religions approach – trying to figure out how and why certain forms of religiosity took shape the way they did instead of assuming that it was religious experience that made religion” (Alan Cole, Fathering Your Father (2009), xi).

Thus, Faure and historians who follow his approach write religious history absent of religion as an internal activity, aimed at self-improvement, transcendental, or altruistic. Or perhaps this approach simply considers individual “religious” experiences too personal, too psychologically opaque, to form the basis of historical inquiry, and thus discards consideration of such experiences as “religious” in nature, and instead consider them in mainly terms of materiality and politics.

The authors of A Cultural History of Japanese Buddhism follow more directly the historian Kuroda Toshio’s sociopolitical functionalist approach. While occasionally offering descriptions of Buddhist practice and doctrine, the book largely focuses on: state-control over and connection with Buddhism in Japan (“Buddhism was firmly controlled by the state” during the early period (66)); art as narrative or purely visual, rather than a function of practice (99); Buddhist practice as a means of gaining influence or power at court, and the claim that “undoubtably” the introduction of esoteric lineages was related to the royal court’s interest in such power(106); that the court drove ritual (“Pivotal organizational and philosophical changes begin to arise in the royal court with the consolidation of the annual court ceremonies” (88, 106)).

Throughout, the authors take pains to connect influential Buddhists with the court: “The Daigoji halls, like those in other major monasteries, primarily housed scions of Fujiwara and Minamoto heritage” (107); “The Shingon lineages, from a very early point, […] had a special connection with the royal line” (108); “the intimate association between Tendai’s Enryakuji (Hiei) and the leading Fujiwaras” (108). Every monk who was a member of a royal family is identified in such a manner.

The author’s de-emphasis on “religious” explanations for religious history in Japan is intended to counterbalance writers who rely too much on such explanations. Citing the notable effect of D.T. Suzuki’s presentation of Zen Buddhism to the West (absurdist, gnomic, iconoclastic), and pointing out that “few Japanese Zen adherents, except those in the modern period and particularly those with access to the writings of Suzuki translated into Japanese” would recognize it, the author’s more social-science approach finds some justification. (146-7).

Performance theory is connected with the authors’ approach. A Cultural History of Japanese Buddhism doesn’t lay any groundwork for the reader as to what the doctrine or technique of applying performance theory are. It is a notoriously amorphous field of inquiry. One description of the approach states that “the performative nature of societies around the world, how events and rituals as well as daily life [are] all governed by a code of performance,” and one sees how this aligns with Deal and Ruppert’s approach in the present volume: religious acts are not generated by authenticity, but rather are ritualized and “for show.” Performance theory is difficult to understand as contributing much to an analysis of history, since all human action is outward, and thus all actions are, in a literal sense, “performed.” The negative application of the theory is applied in the present volume: performance theory supports the strategy of avoiding examination the motivations, hearts, or minds of individual in Japanese Buddhist history.

This is a strategy for writing history, and indicates the above-mentioned scholarly caution, perhaps, but also it tends to paint individuals as acting according to a plan (or with hindsight), rather than by caprice, calling, sincerity, compassion, or irrationality. Perhaps it doesn’t matter, in terms of cultural history, whether or not an effect was caused by religion or some other motivation, but only that the effect did occur.

With regard to Buddhist art, the authors acknowledge – particularly as to poetry – that the “undoubted” motivation for including Buddhist themes was a recognition of the contrast between non-attachment and the “intoxication of those who made use of or found beauty in the linguistic arts” (102). Oddly – although in keeping with the author’s “non-religious” approach to religious art – the idea that such an aesthetic intoxication is meant exactly to advance individuals’ practice (e.g., through visualization) is never mentioned, with respect to poetry or any other art form.
- source : Buddhist Art News -

- reference -

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CLICK for more books !


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BUDDHISM & SHINTŌISM IN JAPAN
A-TO-Z PHOTO DICTIONARY OF JAPANESE RELIGIOUS SCULPTURE & ART

- source : Mark Schumacher



Digital Dictionary of Buddhism - 電子佛教辭典 / Edited by A. Charles Muller
sign in as guest
- source : www.buddhism-dict.ne

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2016/11/28

Konryu Daishi and Fudo

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. Japan - Shrines and Temples - Index .
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Konryu Daishi 建立大師 and Fudo Myo-O

建立大師相応和尚 Konryu Daishi So-O Kasho (833 - 918)
(そうおうかしょう) Souou, priest Soo Kasho
His teacher was Ennin.



He was born in 近江国浅井郡 Azaigun in Omi and is said to be a descendant of 天帯彦国押人命 Ametarashihikokunioshihito no Mikoto, the first son of Kōshō 孝昭天皇 Kosho Tenno (475 - 393 BC), the fifth emperor of Japan.
At the age of 15 to entered the monastery at Mount Hieizan and became a monk at age 17.

After long practise he begun to offer flowers every day for seven years at the hall 根本中堂 Konponchudo at temple 比叡山延暦寺 Enryaku-Ji.
Upon approval of 大納言藤原良相 Dainagon Fujiwara Yoshimi (813 - 867) he received his Buddhist name So-O, including the character 相 from Yoshimi.

Legend knows that he was taken to the paradise of Miroku Bosatsu after praying to Fudo Myo-O.

He is the founder of the 北嶺回峯行の創始者 Hokurei Kaihogyo practise of the "Northern Peaks" of Mount Hieizan.
Kaihogyo of the 南山 Southern Peaks had been started by 役行者 En no Gyoja.

He died at the age of 88 at the temple 十妙院 Shosha-In while saying prayers to Amida Nyorai.



明王堂 Myo-O Do(比叡山 / 無動寺谷) Hieizan Mudojidani
法華経常不軽菩薩の行 Hokekyo Sutra, Jofukyo Bosatsu (Sadāparibhūta Bodhisattva)
供花 kuge - "Flower offerings" of 樒 Shikimi branches

不動明王の信仰 - His strong belief in Fudo Myo-O, retreat at 無動寺谷 Mudojidani.
In the Southern district of Hieizan he built the hall 無動寺明王堂 Mudo-Ji Myo-O Do and from there started his Kaihogyo with the aim to become one with Fudo Myo-O himself.

葛川参籠 Katsuragawa sanro retreat
山王信仰 Belief In Sanno at the hall 山王大宮社殿 Sanno Omiya Shaden.
加持祈祷 Fire rituals to heal sick emperors
- reference source : tendai.or.jp/daihoue/profile -

- reference : 建立大師 -



. kaihoogyoo, kaihōgyō 回峰行 Kaihogyo, "circling the mountain" .
The Tendai Marathon Monks

. Ennin 円仁 - Jigaku Daishi 慈覚大師 . (794 – 864)

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Katsuragawa 葛川息障明王院 Katsuragawa Sokusho Myo-O In
滋賀県大津市葛川坊村町155 / Katsuragawa bomuracho 155
安曇山 Adosan Myo-O In


The statue of Fudo is a secret statue and only shown on the 28th day of the 8th month.
The temple was founded in 859 by the priest 相応和尚 So-O

- Chant of the temple
白露の玉まくくずのかつら川 くる秋にしも我はかへらん

- quote -
Sokushō Kō 息障講 Stopping-Obstacles Group
an organization of individuals who devotedly serve the practitioner and act as guides through the Kyoto portion of the circumambulation.
- Writes Catherine Ludvik:
"The Sokushou-kou appears to derive its name from a temple in the western foothills of Mt. Hira in Shiga Prefecture known as Katsuragawa Sokushō Myō-ō-in 葛川息障明王院, an important center of Tendai mountain asceticism since the Heian period (794-1185).
The temple was established by the founding figure of the Kaihougyou, the Tendai monk Souou 相応 (831-918), who performed ascetic practices in this area. When Fudo Myo-o appeared to him in a waterfall, Souou jumped in to embrace him, and, finding a log of a katsura 葛 tree, enshrined it.
Tradition has it that from this log of katsura he carved three images of Fudo, worshipped today at Katsuragawa Sokushou Myou-ou-in, the temple he established near the waterfall, at Mudouji 無動寺 (Mudo-Ji), the temple he set up on Mt. Hiei, and at Isakiji 伊崎寺 in Shiga Prefecture."
- source : Mark Schumacher -

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Mudooji 無動寺明王堂 Mudo-Ji Myo-O Do
滋賀県大津市坂本本町4220 / 4220 Sakamotohonmachi, Otsu
比叡山 Heiezan Mudo-Ji



The temple was founded by
建立大師相応和尚 (そうおうかしょう) Konryu Daishi So-O Kasho in 865.

- Chant of the temple
詣で来る人のねがひの満ち足れと 
ただひとすじ耳祈る明け今れ




The statue of Fudo Myo-O is secret and only shown during the mandala ritual
明王講曼荼羅供法要 on 6月23日 June 23.

- reference : 無動寺明王堂 滋賀県 -

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Isakiji 伊崎寺 Isaki-Ji (Izaki-Ji)
滋賀県近江八幡市白王町1391 / Shiraocho, Omihachiman, Shiga

Isaki no saotobi 伊崎の竿飛び Isaki Pole Diving
- quote -
Izaki Pole Diving is a Buddhist rite held on the 1st Sunday of August every year at Izaki Temple in Shirao Town in Omihachiman City, Shiga Prefecture.



Izakiji Temple located at the tip of the small peninsula protruding into Lake Biwa is a temple belonging to the Tendai sect. It is said that the temple was founded in the Teikan era (859-877) by Priest Gyoki.
A thick, square 13m pole protrudes out in parallel to Lake Biwa, about 7 meters above the water.
On the day of the event young trainees at the temple dive boldly from the end of the pole, or drop into the water after hanging by their feet from the metal ring also attached to it.



The rite is said to date back more than 1100 years, to when the monk Konryu Daishi trained at the temple.
He would throw a bowl down onto the lake in order to collect charity from the fishermen below, and then dive down into the water to pick it up again.
It is performed to pray for getting rid of bad luck and also testing for participants’ courage, which is a vestige of harsh ascetic training performed by Tendai monks.
The spectators on fishing boats on the lake erupt into cheers and applause when gallant young men dive into the lake with splashes of water in the strong sunshine.
- source : nippon-kichi.jp -


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Hoozanji, Hōzan-ji 宝山寺 / 寳山寺 Hozan-Ji - Ikoma
奈良県生駒市門前町1-1 / 1-1 Monzenchō, Ikoma-shi, Nara



- quote -
'Ikoma-Shoten' 生駒聖天.
a Buddhist temple in Monzenmachi, Ikoma, Nara, Japan.
It is also called 'Ikoma-Shoten' (生駒聖天).
The area around Hozan-ji was originally a place for the training of Buddhist monks.
The name of the place at that time was Daisho-Mudo-ji (大聖無動寺).

Mount Ikoma was originally an object of worship for the ancient people in the region, and so this area was selected as a place for religious training. The training area is said to have opened in 655 by En no Gyōja. Many Buddhist monks, including Kukai (空海), are said to have trained in here.

Hozan-ji started when Tankai (湛海) re-opened this training area in the 17th century. Tankai set up a statue of Kankiten at this place in 1678, the official year Hozan-ji was established.
In the Edo period, this temple was one of the most popular Buddhist temples in this region.
- - - More in the WIKIPEDIA !



source : iroenpithu-12.boo.jp

. Kinki Pilgrimages to 36 Fudo Temples 近畿三十六不動尊巡礼 .
Nr. 29 Hoozanji 宝山寺 Hozan-Ji
Ikomasan 生駒山


source : www.kinki36fudo.org/29

The main statue is a Shoten 聖天.
Outside is also a mizukake Fudo 水かけ不動.



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. Shiga Prefecture 滋賀県 Fudo Myo-O Temples .

. Fudō Myō-ō, Fudoo Myoo-Oo 不動明王 Fudo Myo-O
Acala Vidyârâja - Vidyaraja - Fudo Myoo .


. 薬師如来 Yakushi Nyorai 薬師如来 Bhaisajyaguru - ABC .

. O-Mamori お守り Amulets and Talismans .

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. Pilgrimages to Fudo Temples 不動明王巡礼
Fudo Myo-O Junrei - Fudo Pilgrims - INTRODUCTION .



. Japan - Shrines and Temples - Index .


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2016/11/22

Korinbo Tengu Koyasan

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. Tengupedia - 天狗ペディア - Tengu ABC-Index .
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Koorinboo 高林坊 Korin-Bo, Korinbo
護法天狗高林坊 Goho Tengu Korin-Bo, protector of the law
identical with 狩場明神 Kariba Myojin of Mount Koyasan


He is one of the
. 四十八天狗 48 Tengu of Japan .

He is the local protector deity (jinushigami) and Tengu leader from 高野山 Mount Koyasan.

. Koya San in Wakayama 高野山 和歌山県 .
and its founder 空海 弘法大師 Kukai Kobo Daishi
- Introduction -

Kobo Daishi met the deity 狩場明神 Kariba Myojin in 815.

. Niu Myoojin 丹生明神 Niu Myojin .
A female mountain deity that resides in Mt. Koya 高野山.
Nui Myoujin's son (or emanation) Kariba Myojin 狩場明神 (also known as 高野明神 Koya Myojin) appeared as a hunter who led Kukai to the site.


. jinushigami 地主神 "deity of the land" .

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- reference source : toki.moo.jp/gaten 419 -

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Apart from Korin-Bo there lived many other Tengu on the mountain and in the valleys to protect them, but Korin-Bo was their leader.

One of them was Myoo-on boo 妙音坊 Myoon-Bo, Myoonbo.

The legend of the Tengu from 高野山弁天岳 Mount Bentendake (984 m)


- reference source : toki.moo.jp/gaten 281 -

Benzaiten is venerated at the shrine 弁財天社 on this mountain.
Myoon-Bo Tengu lived on a large cedar tree in the compound and protected the shrine.

. Benten, Benzaiten 弁天 弁財天 .

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. - - - Join my Tengupedia friends on facebook ! - - - .

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. 四十八天狗 - 48 famous Tengu of Japan .

. Tengu 天狗と伝説 Tengu legends "Long-nosed Goblin" .

. - yookai, yōkai 妖怪 Yokai monsters - .

. Legends and Tales from Japan 伝説 - Introduction .

- #korinbo #korinbotengu #koyasantengu -
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Kumamoto Henro Kyushu

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. . 九州88ヶ所108霊場 Kyushu - 88 and 108 Henro temples . .
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Kumamoto 熊本県 Henro Pilgrims

50 願成寺 Ganjo-Ji
51 勘代寺 Kandai-Ji
52 高寺院 Takatera-In
53 観蓮寺 Kanren-Ji
54 医王寺 Io-Ji
55 本蔵院 Honzo-In
56 金剛寺 Kongo-Ji
57 蓮華院誕生寺 Renge-In Tanjo-Ji
58 金剛寺 Kongo-Ji

98 生善院 Shozen-in
99 高野寺 Koya-Ji
100 金剛乗寺 Kongojo-Ji
101 大勝寺 Taisho-Ji



source : nihon-naigai.com/html

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50 Ganjooji 願成寺 Ganjo-Ji
伝法山
熊本県人吉市願成寺町956 / Ganjojimachi, Hitoyoshi


51 Kandaiji 勘代寺 Kandai-Ji
遍照山吉祥院
熊本県球磨郡多良木町久米1396 / Kume, Taragi, Kuma District


52 Takaterain 高寺院 Takatera-In
金剛山
熊本県球磨郡山江村大字山田甲1640 / Kō Yamada, Yamae-mura, Kuma-gun


53 Kanrenji 観蓮寺 Kanren-Ji
千福山
熊本県人吉市城本町村山1363 / Hitoyoshi, Murayama


54 医王寺 Io-Ji
白雲山
熊本県八代市袋町5-34 / Fukuromachi, Yatsushiro


55 Honzooin 本蔵院 Honzo-In
最栄山
熊本県熊本市中央区本荘6-15-50 / Honjo, Chuo Ward, Kumamoto


56 Kongooji 金剛寺 Kongo-Ji
白蓮山
熊本県熊本市中央区新屋敷1-22-12 / Shinyashiki, Chuo Ward, Kumamoto,


57 Tanjooji 蓮華院誕生寺 Renge-In Tanjo-Ji
高原山
熊本県玉名市築地2288 / Tsuiji, Tamana


Nr. 58 金剛寺 Kongo-Ji
熊本県荒尾市宮内出目373 / Kunaideme, Arao


98 Shoozenin 生善院 Shozen-in
千光山
熊本県球磨郡水上村大字岩野3542 / Iwano, Mizukami, Kuma District


Nr. 99 . Kooyaji 高野寺 Koya-Ji .
青井山 Aoi san
熊本県人吉市下青井町47 / Shimoaoimachi, Hitoyoshi, Kumamoto


100 Kongoojooji, Kongōjō-ji 金剛乗寺 Kongojo-Ji
護国山
熊本県山鹿市山鹿1592 / Yamaga, Kumamoto


101 Taishooji 大勝寺 Taisho-Ji
成田山 Naritasan
熊本県荒尾市下井手1595-6 / Shimoide, Arao


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- reference : list with stamps -
- reference source : www.kyushyu88.com -

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. Fudō Myō-ō, Fudoo Myoo-Oo 不動明王 Fudo Myo-O
Acala Vidyârâja - Vidyaraja – Fudo Myoo .


. 九州三十六不動尊霊場 Kyushu - 36 Fudo temples .

. . Pilgrimages to Fudo Temples 不動明王巡礼
Fudo Myo-O Junrei - Introduction - .


The Five Great Wisdom Kings, Godai Myo-O - 五大明王
. The Five Great Elements of the Universe - 地水火風空の五大 .

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. 四国お遍路さん Pilgrims in Shikoku . - General Information

Koya San in Wakayama

Kobo Daishi Kukai 弘法大師 空海
(Kooboo Daishi, Kuukai)

. Gyoki Bosatsu 行基菩薩 (668 - 749) Saint Gyōki .


Haiku and Henro:
.... . The Haiku Henro Pilgrimage  

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. Japan - Shrines and Temples - ABC .


[ . BACK to DARUMA MUSEUM . TOP . ]
[ . BACK to WORLDKIGO . TOP . ] - - - - - #kumamotohenro #kyushuhenrokumamoto - - - - -
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2016/11/21

Saga Henro Kyushu

[ . BACK to DARUMA MUSEUM TOP . ]
. . 九州88ヶ所108霊場 Kyushu - 88 and 108 Henro temples . .
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Saga 佐賀県 Henro Pilgrims

04 不動院 Fudo-In
60 龍王院 Ryuo-In
61 高野寺 Koya-Ji
62 誕生院 Tanjo-In
63 蓮厳院 Renge-In
67 東光寺 Toko-Ji
68 無動院 Mudo-In
69 西光密寺 Saikomitsu-Ji
70 宝光院 Hoko-In
80 鶴林寺 Kakurin-Ji
81 大聖院 Daisho-In
82 千如寺 Sennyo-Ji
102 光明寺 Komyo-Ji
103 大定寺 Daijo-Ji
104 金剛寺 Kongo-Ji



source : nihon-naigai.com/html

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04 瑞光山 Zuikozan 不動院 Fudo-In
佐賀県鳥栖市田代大官町824
824 Tashirodaikanmachi, Tosu-shi, Saga
- source : www.kyushyu88.com/temple04

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Ryuuoo-In  龍王院 Ryuo-In
Nr. 60 佐賀成田山 Saga Naritasan - 龍王院

佐賀県三養基郡上峰町堤1903 / Tsutsumi, Kamimine, Miyaki District, Saga

The main statue of Fudo Myo-O was carved by Kobo Daishi himself on behest of Emperor Saga Tenno 嵯峨天皇.

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- source : Jake Ojisan

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- shared by Bradfort, facebook -
ema 絵馬 stamp

- - - - - Homepage of the temple
- source : /www.kyushyu88.com

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61 普明山 高野寺 Fumyozan Koya-Ji
〒849-2201 佐賀県武雄市北方町志久3245
Kitagatacho Oaza Shiku, Takeo, Saga

62 密厳山 誕生院 Mitsugonzan Tanjo-In
佐賀県鹿島市納富分2011
Nodomibun, Kashima, Saga
錐鑽身代不動明王 Kirimomi Migawari Fudo (Shikoku Henro 06)

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Rengein 蓮厳院 Renge-In
Nr. 63 金剛勝山 Kongoshozan - 蓮厳院 Renge-In


佐賀県鹿島市大字山浦甲1476 / Kashima

The main statues are two 弥陀如来 Amida Nyorai and
薬師如来 Yakushi Nyorai, dating to the Heian period.

Close by is the shrine 祐徳稲荷神社 Yutoku Inari Jinja.

In the back is the temple 奥之院岩屋山興法寺, where the young 覚鑁上人 Saint Kakuban (1095 - 1143) used to practise.


. Legend of Kirimomi Fudo and Kakuban .

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Statues of Fudo Myo-O and Jizo Bosatsu in the garden

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- - - - - Yearly Festivals 年中行事

1月 1日   修正家内安全交通安全祈願法要
1月27日~2月3日 星祭祈願法要
4月22日   弘法大師正御影供お砂踏法要
5月       水子供養法要
6月15日    青葉祭 Aoba Matsuri
8月第4日曜 施餓鬼法要
10月第1日曜 本尊祭柴灯護摩、火渡り法要
1、2、7、9、11、12月 大師講法要

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67 三間山 東光寺 Mimasan Toko-Ji
佐賀県武雄市山内町大字三間坂甲14866
Takeo

68 阿遮山 無動院 Ashazan Mudo-In
佐賀県武雄市山内町大野黒髪9122
Takeo

69 黒髪山 西光密寺 Kurokamisan Saikomitsu-Ji
佐賀県武雄市山内町宮野黒髪山
Takeo

70 龍門山 宝光院 Ryumonzan Hoko-In
佐賀県西松浦郡有田町広瀬甲354
Kō Hirose, Arita-chō, Nishimatsuura-gun, Saga

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80 吉原山 鶴林寺 Yoshiharasan Kakurin-Ji
佐賀県唐津市和多田百人町3-88
Watada Hyakuninmachi, Karatsu, Saga

81 中台山 大聖院 Chudaisan Daisho-In
佐賀県唐津市西寺町1369
Nishideramachi, Karatsu, Saga


. 82 Sennyoji 千如寺 Sennyo-Ji .
福岡県前原市雷山626 626 Raizan, Itoshima, Fukuoka
The main temple is located on the border to Saga / Fukuoka

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102 遍照山 光明寺 Henjozan Komyo-Ji
佐賀県武雄市朝日町字甘久2622
Asahicho Oaza Amagu, Takeo, Saga

103 姑射山 大定寺 Koyasan Daijo-Ji
佐賀県嬉野市嬉野町大字吉田丁4129
Ureshinomachi Oaza Yoshida, Ureshino, Saga
わけのぼる はなのうてなの のりのやま
だいしのめぐみ うけてうれしき


105 鎮西高野山 金剛寺 Chinzei Koyasan Kongo-Ji
佐賀県唐津市相知町長部田718
Ochicho Nagaheta, Karatsu, Saga

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- reference : list with stamps -
- reference source : www.kyushyu88.com -

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. Fudō Myō-ō, Fudoo Myoo-Oo 不動明王 Fudo Myo-O
Acala Vidyârâja - Vidyaraja – Fudo Myoo .


. 九州三十六不動尊霊場 Kyushu - 36 Fudo temples .

. . Pilgrimages to Fudo Temples 不動明王巡礼
Fudo Myo-O Junrei - Introduction - .


The Five Great Wisdom Kings, Godai Myo-O - 五大明王
. The Five Great Elements of the Universe - 地水火風空の五大 .

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. 四国お遍路さん Pilgrims in Shikoku . - General Information

Koya San in Wakayama

Kobo Daishi Kukai 弘法大師 空海
(Kooboo Daishi, Kuukai)

. Gyoki Bosatsu 行基菩薩 (668 - 749) Saint Gyōki .


Haiku and Henro:
.... . The Haiku Henro Pilgrimage  

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. Japan - Shrines and Temples - ABC .


[ . BACK to DARUMA MUSEUM . TOP . ]
[ . BACK to WORLDKIGO . TOP . ] - - - - - #sagahenrokyushu - - - - -
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2016/11/14

Doryo Daigongen Tengu

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. Tengupedia - 天狗ペディア - Tengu ABC-Index .
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Dooryoo Daigongen, Dōryō 道了大権現 Doryo Daigongen
and Temple Daiyūzan 大雄山 Daiyuzan 最乗寺 Saijo-Ji
妙覚道了大権現 Myokaku Doryo Daigongen
Dooryoo Satta 道了薩埵 Doryo Satta
菩薩道了 (ボサツドウリョウ) Bosatsu Doryo



CLICK for more photos !

- quote
The "Great Avatar Doryo."
This man was a mountain ascetic before he became a Soto Zen monk, turning into a Tengu after death.

In 2005, scholar Duncan Williams published
“The Other Side of Zen: A Social History of Soto Zen Buddhism in Tokugawa Japan.”
Chapter Four of this book, entitled “The Cult of Doryo Daigongen: Daiyuzan and Soto Prayer Temples” forces us to overcome the traditional boundaries of Buddhist scholarship to examine the emergence of a popular cult and its links with the mountain ascetics and Shinto. The “great avatar Doryo (Douryou)” 道了大権現 had been a mountain ascetic before becoming a Soto Zen monk, and was eventually appointed as head cook and administrator at Daiyūzan Temple 大雄山 (Kanagawa Prefecture).
However, upon his death in 1411 AD, he vowed to become the guardian of the monastery and he is believed to have metamorphosed into a TENGU 天狗.
According to legend, “his body was then engulfed in flames as he appeared transformed and stood on a white fox to promise a life free from illness and full of riches for those who sincerely worshipped him.”
Here, the legendary anecdote leads to a detailed analysis of how since the 17th century this became linked to the mass production and sale of the Doryo (Douryou) talisman.
Another related phenomenon is that of pilgrimage to this sacred site (Daiyūzan Temple), highlighted through the concrete evidence provided by stone markers. It allows the author to determine that these pilgrimages “took off from the mid-1860s.
-- Above review from the Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 33/1 (2006, pages 176, written by Michel Mohr, Doshisha University. Duncan Williams’ book. --
- source : Mark Schumacher



- reference : doryo daigongen -

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- quote -
MORE ON DOURYOU DAIGONGEN TENGU WHO BECOMES A BOSATSU
As the myth goes,
a young monk came to settle upon this mountain many centuries ago, he was determined to build a temple there but soon found that he could not do it on his own. This is when he met the long nosed, winged, tengu named Doriyo. After receiving the teachings of the monk, Doriyo was so moved that he vowed to help build Saijoji Temple with his magical feats of strength and energy. Doriyo then lifted a huge boulder and threw it to the center of the clearing stating this will be the foundation.



Today if you visit this monastery you will see the boulder wrapped in protective Shinto ropes sitting in the middle of the compound.
Nearby there is a well, with water that is said to have miraculous healing powers. People come from all over Japan to fill their plastic jugs with this water, and take it home with them.
At the top of the compound there is a shrine for Doriyo where it becomes clear that he has been elevated from Tengu status to that of Bodhisattva (Bosatsu) status. The monks referred to him as Doriyo Bosatsu.
Giant Getta (wooden slippers) adorn the outside of the shrine. Some were as big as a golf cart.
- source : suryaariwardana.wordpress.com -


This Tengu 道了薩埵 Doryo Satta then took a huge jump and now
lives on Myoojoogadake 明星ヶ岳 Mount Myojogadake (924m) in Hakone
(or so some legends say).


source : toki.moo.jp/gaten - 173 / 703

Myojogadake was the
Tengu no tamariba 天狗のたまり場 gathering place of many local Tengu.
They came here night after night to drink and be merry.
The sound of their dancing to flutes and drums could be heard way down the valley.



Once a farmer named ご八 Gohachi living at the foot of Myojogadake went to have a bath and never came back. The villagers went looking for him but never found him. Three years later they called a priest and wanted to have a memorial service held for him. During their preparations Gohachi came back to the village. When they asked where he had been all the time, he said he spent only three days and nights drinking with the Tengu. That was all he remembered.

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Daiyuuzan, Daiyūzan 大雄山 Daiyuzan
Saijooji 最乗寺 Temple Saijo-Ji

神奈川県南足柄市大雄町1157 / Daiyucho, Minamiashigara, Kanagawa


Tengu amulet from the Temple

- quote -
Saijoji, located in southern Kanagawa Prefecture, is an amazing temple that even most Japanese have never heard of. The temple was founded in 1394 by 了庵 Ryoan Emyo Zenji, former head priest of Sojiji, one of the two head temples of the Soto Zen Buddhism Sect.

Currently the temple complex consists of more than 30 halls and temple buildings. Many giant cedars, planted over 500 years ago, line the road leading to the temple and tower over the compound itself. The atmosphere is similar to that of Nikko's Toshogu, but without the crowds of people.

There are many legends associated with the temple. One of the most interesting occurred in 1411, when Emyo Zenji passed away. His most trusted disciple, Doryo Myokaku, was devastated. As a result, Doryo Myokaku magically transformed and flew off into the mountains where he became a Bodhisattva, protector of the temple and its followers. He took the form of a tengu.

All seasons at Saijoji are lovely, but 10,000 hydrangea bushes lining the road to the temple make June especially lovely. The autumn colors are equally impressive.


CLICK for more photos of the Geta 下駄 collection !

Since then, many make the pilgrimage to visit the 'Goshin-den', a hall built to honor 'Doryo-son'. Followers have donated metal geta sandals in his honor (as tengu usually wear geta). Some of them are gigantic, and it is said that if a pregnant woman walks under the largest pair, she will have an easy delivery.
At the temple gate are statues of the two Tengu, big and small 大天狗 and 小天狗.


source : Tohoku Culture Research Center

The main hall
enshrines three statues, Shaka Nyorai and two attendants, Monju Bosatsu and Fugen Bosatsu. It is a gorgeous building and visitors are welcome to enter (sans shoes) if there are no ceremonies taking place inside. The oldest structure within the compound is a pagoda, built in 1863.
All seasons
at Saijoji are lovely, but 10,000 hydrangea bushes lining the road to the temple make June especially lovely. The autumn colors are equally impressive. ...
- source : Sandra Isaka 2013 -




- - - - - Homepage of the Temple :
- reference source : daiyuuzan.or.jp -

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. . . CLICK here for Photos of the temple!

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The Other Side of Zen:
A Social History of Sōtō Zen Buddhism in Tokugawa Japan

Duncan Ryuken Williams


- quote -
Popular understanding of Zen Buddhism typically involves a stereotyped image of isolated individuals in meditation, contemplating nothingness. This book presents the "other side of Zen," by examining the movement's explosive growth during the Tokugawa period (1600-1867) in Japan and by shedding light on the broader Japanese religious landscape during the era. Using newly-discovered manuscripts, Duncan Ryuken Williams argues that the success of Soto Zen was due neither to what is most often associated with the sect, Zen meditation, nor to the teachings of its medieval founder Dogen, but rather to the social benefits it conveyed.

Zen Buddhism promised followers many tangible and attractive rewards, including the bestowal of such perquisites as healing, rain-making, and fire protection, as well as "funerary Zen" rites that assured salvation in the next world. Zen temples also provided for the orderly registration of the entire Japanese populace, as ordered by the Tokugawa government, which led to stable parish membership.

Williams investigates both the sect's distinctive religious and ritual practices and its nonsectarian participation in broader currents of Japanese life. While much previous work on the subject has consisted of passages on great medieval Zen masters and their thoughts strung together and then published as "the history of Zen," Williams' work is based on care of examination of archival sources including temple logbooks, prayer and funerary manuals, death registries, miracle tales of popular Buddhist deities, secret initiation papers, villagers' diaries, and fund-raising donor lists.
- source : amazon.com -

. Welcome to Edo 江戸 ! .

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. - - - Join my Tengupedia friends on facebook ! - - - .

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. 四十八天狗 - 48 famous Tengu of Japan .

. Tengu 天狗と伝説 Tengu legends "Long-nosed Goblin" .

. - yookai, yōkai 妖怪 Yokai monsters - .

. Legends and Tales from Japan 伝説 - Introduction .

. Japanese Legends - 伝説 民話 昔話 – ABC-List .

- #doryodaigongen #daiyuzan #saijoji #myojogadake -
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2016/10/24

Tengu from Nikko

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. Tengupedia - 天狗ペディア - Tengu ABC-Index .
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Nikkoozan Tookooboo 日光山東光坊 - Tengu Tokobo. Toko-Bo from Mount Nikko
He is one of the
. 四十八天狗 48 Tengu of Japan .

There lived another Tengu, also one of the 48 great ones, called
Myoogizan Nikkooboo 妙義山日光坊 - Nikkobo, Myogisan
- see below -


En no Gyoja 役小角 and Unpen Shonin 雲遍上人 once came to a 清瀧 waterfall in the 日光山 Nikko Mountains to practise austerities. Suddenly a black cloud hang over the waterfall and a terrible thunderstorm rattled and strong wind blew.
The two of them were 一心不乱 undisturbed by all this, sat down and said their esoteric mantras in deep quiet.
Suddenly the sky cleared again and now they saw a Tengu sitting in the branches of the large cedar tree. The Tengu faded from sight in no time.

. Tengu, sugi 天狗と杉と伝説 Legends about Tengu and Cedar trees .
- Introduction -

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Nikkoozan Tookooboo 日光山東光坊 Tengu Tokobo. Toko-Bo from Mount Nikko


source : blogs.yahoo.co.jp/gtmf10

In a highland called 古峯ヶ原 Kobugahara, from where the town of 鹿沼市 Kanuma can be overlooked, there is the shrine
Komine Jinja 古峯ヶ原古峯神社.
It dates back more than 1300 years. If was founded by a man from Kyoto, 隼人 Hayato,
and its deity in residence is
日本武尊 Yamato Takeru

This shrine is better known by its name of
Tengu no Yashiro 天狗の社 Shrine of the Tengu
People used to stay here for religious rituals and practise, so it is also called
Tengu no yado 天狗の宿 "The Inn of the Tengu"

The shrine has many memorabilia of the Tengu, big and small.
It also offers stamps of the Tengu, 天狗の御朱印 with 16 different faces of the Tengu.



. Tengu Shuin 天狗朱印 temple stamps .

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There used to live many Tengu in the mountains of Nikko, and their boss was Tokobo.

Apart from Toko-Bo and Nikko-Bo there was the local Tengu

Kobugahara Hayatoboo 古峯ヶ原隼人坊 Hayato-Bo from Kobugahara
It is not quite clear if he is the person who founded the shrine.
Hayato may have been a disciple of En no Gyoja or a relative of
. Zenkibō 前鬼坊 Zenkibo, Zenki-Bo .
and his wife Goki 後鬼.

- - - Later
. Shoodoo Shoonin 勝道上人 Priest Saint Shodo Shonin - Introduction . (735 - 817)
practised Shugendo rituals in Nikko and helped deepen the belief in the Tengu, who would protect people from misfortune and extinguish fires in the region.

There is a ceremony in Nikko where the participants receive large bowls of rice.
Nikko Gohanshiki 日光強飯式 Nikko Gohan Shiki
It is also called
tengu no goohan 天狗の強飯 large rice portion of the Tengu
..... One bowl contains 5,4 kilograms (一升五合) of rice.
This ceremony goes back to Saint Shodo Shonin (Shoodoo Shoonin 勝道上人)(735 - 817), who started the mountain worship in Nikko, connecting the Shinto and Budshist religion.

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日光の天狗は徳川家康 The Tengu of Nikko and Tokugawa Ieyasu

Mount Nantaisan 男体山 (2484.2m) in Oku Nikko had been first visited by Saint Shodo in 782. At that time it was called 補陀洛山 Fudaraku San, later changed to 二荒山(ふたらやま) Futarayama.
Kobo Daishi Kukai read the two Chinese characters 二荒 as にこう nikoo, and soon the name changed to にっこう Nikko. The Chinese characters then changed to 日光.



Legend says that Toko-Bo was in incarnation of 徳川家康 Tokugawa Ieyasu.
His posthumous name was 東照権現 Tosho Gongen, but legend says he had also pondered the name of
Tookoo Gongen 東光権現 Toko Gongen (Deity Shining in the East)

Since his soul-Tengu was a newcomer, he tried to fight the older Tengu of the deep mountains of Nikko, but always lost ground.

When his memorial shrine, 東照宮 Toshogu, was finished, many people came to visit here and venerate the former Shogun (turned Tengu), so the older Tengu of Nikko were quite upset.
They played tricks on the visitors and caused much confusion.

The year turned to 1825, the time of 徳川家斉 Shogun Tokugawa Ienari.
His Minister, Mizuno Dewa no Kami 水野出羽守, made friends with the Old Tengu of Kobugahara, Hayato-Bo, who helped him to get rid of the other Old Tengu by putting up a sign forbidding them to come closer and not disturb the visitors coming to venerate the Shogun turned Tengu Toko-Bo. If they did not like it, they were free to move on to the other famous Tengu Mountains, like Atago, Kurama, Akiba or Hikosan.
- This sounds like a fantastic tale . . . maybe it is true? maybe not true?

- reference source : toki.moo.jp/gaten/401-450 -


As late as 1860, in advance of a visit by the shogun Iemochi, officials of the city of Nikko posted an official notice:
To the tengu and the other demons:
Whereas our shogun intends to visit the Nikko mausoleums next April: Now therefore, Tengu and other demons inhabiting these mountains must remove elsewhere until the shogun’s visit is concluded.

. Hirata Atsutane 平田篤胤 and the Tengu 仙童寅吉 Sendo Torakichi .


. Tokugawa Ieyasu 徳川家康 . (1543 - 1616) .
and his mausoleum, 日光の東照宮 Nikko no Tosho-Gu

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In the Manga world the Tengu Tokobo is a master of 光壁術
日光に住まう陽気で楽天家な天狗。
明るく人当りも良いが人間は天狗に従属すべきだと思っており、一度比叡天狗に追放されている。
- reference source : wikiwiki.jp/heian -

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Myoogizan Nikkooboo 妙義山日光坊 Nikko-Bo, Nikkobo, Myogisan

He is now venerated in Gunma at Mount Myogisan (Myogizan).

- quote -
Mt. Myogisan



The fantastically shaped rocks sculpt dramatic forms of natural beauty and offer various attractive landscapes throughout the seasons. Mt. Myogisan can be viewed with pleasure from afar or enjoyed by climbing its steep slopes, so that it is loved by photographers and mountaineers.
- source : visitgunma.jp/en/sightseeing -

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Myoogi Jinja 妙義神社 Shrine Myogi Jinja
It was founded in 537 and is thus one of the oldes shrines in Japan.
The Mountain Deity itself is enshrined here.
The Deity is venerated for protecting from fire, bring a good harvest and also for good business and prosperity. So many famous Daimyo Lords came here to worship and donate buildings and treasures.
日本武尊 Prince Yamato Takeru is also enshrined here.

This shrine is located near the eastern foot of Mount 白雲山 Hakuun-zan, one of the peaks of Mt. Myogi.
It is known for its bright colours and decorative ornaments.
The shrine building now is from around 1700.
At its gate are two Demon statues, one red and one in green, with tiger-skin pants.
This shrine serves quite a lot of deities and mountain spirits.

At the back of the main shrine is a small sub-shrine dedicated to the regional Tengu.


. . . CLICK here for more Photos !


When Yamato Takeru climbed 白雲山 Mount Hakuun-zan , he founded a shrine to venerate the deity
Hagoso 波己曽(はごそ)神, and the mountain was named after it, 波己曽山 Hagoso-zan. This name later changed to Myogiisan.
Hakoso Jinja 波己曽神社 / 波己曽(はこそ)神社 Hakoso Shrine

In the year 1394 a high-ranking court official named 花山院 Kazan-In 右近衛大将藤原長親 Nagachika (? - 1429) renounced the world and became a Waka poet and monk, calling himself
Kooun Meigi 耕雲明魏 (こううんめいぎ)Koun Meigi
and built his humble abode at mount 華頂山 Kacho-zan in the forests of Kyoto, one of the 36 peaks of the 東山三十六峰 / 東山36峰 Higashiyama Mountain range.
After living there for about 10 years, he took of for a trip to the Kanto region and ended up at Mount Myogisan. The local people had great faith in him.
After his death he was venerated as
Myoogi Hooshi 妙魏法師 Myogi Hoshi , changing his name from
明魏 Meigi to 妙義 Myogi, and also changing the name of the Mountain range in his honor.

- HP of the shrine Myogi Jinja
Hakoso sha 波己曽社(はこそしゃ) Hakoso Shrine in the compound.
- reference source : myougi.jp/yuisho -


. Tamato Takeru 日本武尊 .
legendary prince of the Yamato dynasty - Introduction -


For Yosa Buson, this mountain reminded him of the famous
峨眉山 Gabi San in China.


source : cardiac.exblog.jp

. Yosa Buson 与謝蕪村 visiting Myogisan .

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Tengu Myoogiboo 天狗妙義坊 Myogi-Bo, Myogibo
Ueno Myogiboo
上野妙義坊 Ueno Myogi-Bo


He is one of the
. 四十八天狗 48 Tengu of Japan .

Mount Myogisan with his special rock formation is venerated as the deity
Myogi Daigongen 妙義大権現
with the character DAI LARGE as its symbol.

The Tengu 妙義坊 Myogi-Bo is an incarnation of this Gongen.

妙義山の大ノ字 Myogisan no Dai no Ji



People walking along the old roads with a view to Mount Mogisan folded their hands in prayer.

- reference source : toki.moo.jp/gaten/401-450 413 -

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Hooseiboo 比叡山法性坊 Hoseibo, Hieizan
one of the 48 Tengu.



妙義大権現 Myogi Daigongen is supposed to be Hosei-Bo from Hieizan
比叡山十三代目の座主法性坊尊意僧正, he came here in 940.
He promised to help the people who live in this region.
「われは比叡山座主(ざす)尊意僧正なり。宿世の縁でこの山に住し、衆生を済度せん」


上毛三山・妙義山の奥ノ院
Three peaks of 白雲山 - 金鶏山 - 金洞山
波己曽とは岩社(いわこそ)の意味で岩がご神体
- reference source : toki.moo.jp/gaten/251-300/gate292 -


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. - - - Join my Tengupedia friends on facebook ! - - - .

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. 四十八天狗 - 48 famous Tengu of Japan .

. Tengu 天狗と伝説 Tengu legends "Long-nosed Goblin" .

. - yookai, yōkai 妖怪 Yokai monsters - .

. Legends and Tales from Japan 伝説 - Introduction .

. Japanese Legends - 伝説 民話 昔話 – ABC-List .

- #Nikkotengu #Nikkobo #tokobo #shodoshoninpriest #myogisan -
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