2017/12/31

Welcome to Paradise !

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Welcome to Gokuraku 極楽 the Buddhist Paradise !

I will try and introduce information about the life of Shakyamuni Buddha
and a glossary of terms, many of them are kigo for Japanese haiku.

Paradise, Heaven 極楽 gokuraku and Hell 地獄  jigoku

ano yo あの世 the other world
haraiso はらいそ paradise (paraiso)
higan 彼岸 the other shore
joodo 浄土 Paradise of Amida
ka no yo かの世 the other world
. meido 冥土 冥途 the other world / yomi 黄泉 "the yellow springs" .
paradaisu パラダイス paradise, Paradies
raise 来世 afterlife, the world to come
rakuen 楽園 paradise, earthly paradise
shigo no sekai 死後の世界 the world after death
takai 他界 to die, to pass into the other world
tengoku 天国 heaven
tenjoo 天上 "up there", heaven

. toogen 桃源 Shangri-La シャングリラ, Arcadia, Eden - Toogenkyoo 桃源郷 fairyland, .
桃源郷 lit. Peach Blossom Valley

. Tokoyo no Kuni 常世国, 常世の国 The Eternal Land (of Shintoism) .
yomi 黄泉 the yellow springs, die Gelben Quellen
yuutopia ユートピア Utopia


And in the limbo toward the other world here are a lot of vengeful spirits, monsters and goblins.

. jigoku 地獄 Buddhist hell - Introduction .
naraku ならく / 奈落 hell, hades

. jigoku no oni 地獄の鬼 demons of the Buddhist hell .


. Pilgrimages in Japan - Introduction .


. - - - Glossary of Terms - - - . - not yet in the ABC index.


Your comments and help are most welcome!

Gabi Greve
GokuRakuAn 極楽庵, Japan



. Gokuraku Joodoo 極楽浄土 Gokuraku Jodo, Paradise in the West of Amida Nyorai .



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- - - - - ABC - Table of Contents - - - - -

- AAA - / - BBB - / - CCC - / - DDD - / - EEE -

- FFF - / - GGG - / - HHH - / - I I I - / - JJJ -

- KK KK - / - LLL - / - MMM - / - NNN - / - OOO -

- PPP - / - QQQ - / - RRR - / - SSS - / - TTT -

- UUU - / - VVV - / - WWW - / - XXX - / - YYY - / - ZZZ -


. Reference, LINKS - General Information .


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. Join the Jizo Bosatsu Gallery - Facebook .






. Join the Kannon Bosatsu Gallery on facebook .





. Join the Onipedia Demons on facebook .


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2017/12/29

General Information

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General Information and Reference


- - - - - - - - - - Latest Additions - - -

. Darumapedia - Temples and Gokuraku .

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A Tourist Guidebook to Paradise  
GokuRaku no Kankoo Annai 極楽の観光案内 by 西村公朝 Nishimura Kocho



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- - - - - - - - - - External LINKS - - -


Buddhism in Japan - Buddha Statues - an extensive guide

A-TO-Z PHOTO DICTIONARY
source : Mark Schumacher



Buddhist Art News - Japan
News on Buddhist art, architecture, archaeology, music, dance, and academia.
- source : buddhistartnews.wordpress.com




地獄と極楽がわかる本 - to understand hell and heaven
source : futabasha.co.jp

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A Cultural History of Japanese Buddhism
William E. Deal, Brian Ruppert




- quote -
Review by Jonathan Ciliberto
Intended for “upper-level undergraduate and graduate students as well as scholars,” A Cultural History of Japanese Buddhism fills a gap by presenting largely recent work of Japanese and Western scholars on Japanese Buddhism. The authors consider prior books on Buddhist cultural history as largely from Indian and Tibetan viewpoints. The particular presumptions, intellectual models, or even prejudices of such positions (e.g., to view Japanese Buddhism as a distant reflection, or a corruption, of a continental original) are seen as obstacles to an accurate history of Buddhism’s influence and interaction with Japan.

The great value of the book is to direct readers to approaches and theories perhaps overlooked by more general histories of Buddhism. Each chapter includes its own bibliography and notes, making the book useful for study of narrow sections of Japan’s history.

Published in 2015, many summaries of and citations to recent scholarship are incorporated. Although a relatively short volume (~200 pages, absent notes and biolographies), it includes a great deal of purely historical information surrounded by “cultural history,” covering Japan from protohistory to the present. The book includes a character glossary.

Some themes that run through the book are: that Buddhism in Japan was not a monolithic “ism,” and that individual sects were not exclusive of one another but rather interacted in practice and doctrine; the complex interaction of indigenous religion with Buddhism; Buddhist lineages in Japan as the agents of cultural influence (e.g., “lineages had already begun to pursue the possibility of an ultimate deity”).

Many chapters include subsections on women and gender in Japanese Buddhism, including a fascinating section on the link between literary salons “established in women’s circles” and often held within monasteries and creating an environment for “the evolving and intimate connection between monastic Buddhists and their lay supporters” (102-4). More generally, these sections illustrate the important influence of women on Japanese Buddhism throughout its history. The book also devotes substantial attention to religion in Japan in the modern period, a much-needed resource.

One instance of a simplification of Japanese history that the authors seek to correct is the view that Shinto and Buddhism remained largely separate strands. While the doctrine of honji-suijaku is relatively well-known, the book reveals in greater depth the complex interplay between the two religions by reference to the writings of recent (and less-recent) scholars.

Another attempt to reveal subtlety beyond a stock scholarly view concerns (in the Heian period) the “limitations of the ‘rhetoric of decadence’ [that] some scholars attribute to ‘old’ Buddhism”. The authors offer Minamoto no Tamenori’s (d. 1101) Sanbo’e as an attempt “to incorporate other parts of the populace” beyond the aristocracy. This undercuts the claim that “practitioners of the ‘old’ Buddhism were completely unconcerned with those outside their walls” as a cause of the emergence of “religious heroes” (like Kukai and Nichiren) (88-90). (That said, the ongoing theme of Japanese Buddhists, unsatisfied with the quality of teaching in Japan, who sought original texts and more authoritative teachers in China, does support the basis of a kind of “decadent” Buddhism.)

It is important to have a sense of what “cultural history” is, or what it intends to do, before considering the authors’ approach to a history Japanese Buddhism. Given that cultural history includes an extremely wide set of approaches, determining the present authors’ use of it as a method is largely about picking out strands from the mass of possibilities. (One author refers to “the notorious difficulty of organizing the disorderly profusion of intradisciplinary, cross-disciplinary, and varying national-intellectual meanings and understandings of the “culture concept” into anything resembling consensual form” [Geoffrey Eley, “What Is Cultural History?”, New German Critique, No. 65, Cultural History/Cultural Studies, Spring – Summer, 1995, pp. 19-36].)

While the authors don’t set out their approach, generally in the present volume they tend to consider Buddhism in Japan less in terms of its religious or spiritual character or content and more as a generator of social and political forms. Or, rather, it is unspoken that religion was the driving force in developing myriad cultural effects in Japan, but the book doesn’t linger on religion itself, as it does on these effects.

It is unclear whether this approach is based on the position described by the scholar of medieval Japanese Buddhism Bernard Faure when he refers to an “absolute standpoint” as a “contradiction in terms” (Faure, Visions of Power (2000), 9). (Faure is frequently cited in A Cultural History of Japanese Buddhism.) That is: there are no “religious” standpoints motivating individuals, in terms of absolute or ideal concepts, or at least that taking direction from such standpoints is delusional.

Faure’s view (following from Le Goff) is that “literary and artistic works of art (and, in the case of religion, ritual practice) do no represent any eternal, unitary reality, but rather are the products of the imagination of those who produce them” (Faure, 10, emphasis added). A similar view of religion advocates a “History of Religions approach – trying to figure out how and why certain forms of religiosity took shape the way they did instead of assuming that it was religious experience that made religion” (Alan Cole, Fathering Your Father (2009), xi).

Thus, Faure and historians who follow his approach write religious history absent of religion as an internal activity, aimed at self-improvement, transcendental, or altruistic. Or perhaps this approach simply considers individual “religious” experiences too personal, too psychologically opaque, to form the basis of historical inquiry, and thus discards consideration of such experiences as “religious” in nature, and instead consider them in mainly terms of materiality and politics.

The authors of A Cultural History of Japanese Buddhism follow more directly the historian Kuroda Toshio’s sociopolitical functionalist approach. While occasionally offering descriptions of Buddhist practice and doctrine, the book largely focuses on: state-control over and connection with Buddhism in Japan (“Buddhism was firmly controlled by the state” during the early period (66)); art as narrative or purely visual, rather than a function of practice (99); Buddhist practice as a means of gaining influence or power at court, and the claim that “undoubtably” the introduction of esoteric lineages was related to the royal court’s interest in such power(106); that the court drove ritual (“Pivotal organizational and philosophical changes begin to arise in the royal court with the consolidation of the annual court ceremonies” (88, 106)).

Throughout, the authors take pains to connect influential Buddhists with the court: “The Daigoji halls, like those in other major monasteries, primarily housed scions of Fujiwara and Minamoto heritage” (107); “The Shingon lineages, from a very early point, […] had a special connection with the royal line” (108); “the intimate association between Tendai’s Enryakuji (Hiei) and the leading Fujiwaras” (108). Every monk who was a member of a royal family is identified in such a manner.

The author’s de-emphasis on “religious” explanations for religious history in Japan is intended to counterbalance writers who rely too much on such explanations. Citing the notable effect of D.T. Suzuki’s presentation of Zen Buddhism to the West (absurdist, gnomic, iconoclastic), and pointing out that “few Japanese Zen adherents, except those in the modern period and particularly those with access to the writings of Suzuki translated into Japanese” would recognize it, the author’s more social-science approach finds some justification. (146-7).

Performance theory is connected with the authors’ approach. A Cultural History of Japanese Buddhism doesn’t lay any groundwork for the reader as to what the doctrine or technique of applying performance theory are. It is a notoriously amorphous field of inquiry. One description of the approach states that “the performative nature of societies around the world, how events and rituals as well as daily life [are] all governed by a code of performance,” and one sees how this aligns with Deal and Ruppert’s approach in the present volume: religious acts are not generated by authenticity, but rather are ritualized and “for show.” Performance theory is difficult to understand as contributing much to an analysis of history, since all human action is outward, and thus all actions are, in a literal sense, “performed.” The negative application of the theory is applied in the present volume: performance theory supports the strategy of avoiding examination the motivations, hearts, or minds of individual in Japanese Buddhist history.

This is a strategy for writing history, and indicates the above-mentioned scholarly caution, perhaps, but also it tends to paint individuals as acting according to a plan (or with hindsight), rather than by caprice, calling, sincerity, compassion, or irrationality. Perhaps it doesn’t matter, in terms of cultural history, whether or not an effect was caused by religion or some other motivation, but only that the effect did occur.

With regard to Buddhist art, the authors acknowledge – particularly as to poetry – that the “undoubted” motivation for including Buddhist themes was a recognition of the contrast between non-attachment and the “intoxication of those who made use of or found beauty in the linguistic arts” (102). Oddly – although in keeping with the author’s “non-religious” approach to religious art – the idea that such an aesthetic intoxication is meant exactly to advance individuals’ practice (e.g., through visualization) is never mentioned, with respect to poetry or any other art form.
- source : Buddhist Art News -

- reference -

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CLICK for more books !


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BUDDHISM & SHINTŌISM IN JAPAN
A-TO-Z PHOTO DICTIONARY OF JAPANESE RELIGIOUS SCULPTURE & ART

- source : Mark Schumacher



Digital Dictionary of Buddhism - 電子佛教辭典 / Edited by A. Charles Muller
sign in as guest
- source : www.buddhism-dict.ne

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2017/08/16

Korinji Kanazawa

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. Japan - Shrines and Temples - Index .
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Koorinji 香林寺 Korin-Ji, Kanazawa, Ishikawa


石川県金沢市野町1-3-15 / 1-3-15 Nomachi, Kanazawa-shi, Ishikawa

- quote
Erected by Aoki Gohei, one of the chief retainers of the Maeda clan in 1650, the Korin-ji Temple is the top spiritual power spot in Japan where devotees go to pray for love and marriage. To pray at Korin-ji, start by walking three times around the “Road of Happiness” inside the temple’s garden. After that, touch your Chinese zodiac sign image, followed by praying at the statue of Fudo deity. It is believed that you will be blessed with fair beautiful skin if you touch the deity!

Besides seeking spiritual power at Korin-ji, you will be able to immerse yourself in the pretty sight of flowers here too. Don’t miss the chance for a best view of the lovely cherry blossoms around late March to early April here. From late April to early May, bright crimson-coloured Kirishima azalea flowers in bloom delight visitors while beautiful white amaryllis flowers fill the temple grounds around late September to early October.
- source : trip101.com/article/kanazawa-japan...





- - - - -幸福御守 Amulet for good luck and happiness

You buy a tasuki 襷 cord to hold up the sleeves of a kimono, for making a wish.
Write your wish on the Tasuki and hang it around the Zodiac animal of your birthday. The 12 stone statues in the temple garden are waiting to accept the wishes and colorful Tasuki.











CLICK for more photos !


. 12 Zociac animals 干支  eto, kanshi - Introduction .
. ne 子 (nezumi 鼠) Rat (mouse)
. ushi 丑 Ox (cow, bull) .
. tora 寅 Tiger .
. u (usagi) 卯 Rabbit .
. tatsu 辰 Dragon .
. mi (hebi) 巳 Snake, Serpent .
. uma 午 Horse .
. mi (hitsuji) 未 Ram (sheep) .
. saru 申 Monkey .
. tori 酉 Rooster (chicken, cock) .
. inu 戌 Dog .
. i (inoshishi) 亥 Boar (wild boar) .


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- HP of the temple

- reference source : http://www.kourinji.jp/ -


- reference : kanazawa korinji temple -

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. Japan - Shrines and Temples - Index .


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2017/08/12

Kegon Buddhism

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. Japan - Shrines and Temples - Index .
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Kegon-shū 華厳宗 Kegon Sect Buddhism

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Kegon (華厳宗) is the Japanese transmission of the Huayan school of Chinese Buddhism.
Huayan studies were founded in Japan in 736 when the scholar-priest Rōben (良辯 or 良弁), originally a monk of the East Asian Yogācāra tradition, invited Shinshō (traditional Chinese: 審祥; ; pinyin: Shenxiang; Japanese pronunciation: Shinjō; Korean: Simsang) to give lectures on the Avatamsaka Sutra at Kinshōsen Temple (金鐘山寺, also 金鐘寺 Konshu-ji or Kinshō-ji), the origin of later Tōdai-ji.
When the construction of the Tōdai-ji was completed, Rōben entered that temple to formally initiate Kegon as a field of study in Buddhism in Japan, and Kegon-shū would become known as one of the Nanto Rikushū (南都六宗) or Six Buddhist Sects of Nanto). Rōben's disciple Jitchū continued administration of Tōdai-ji and expanded its prestige through the introduction of imported rituals.
Kegon thought would later be popularized by Myōe (明惠), who combined its doctrines with those of Vajrayana and Gyōnen (凝然), and is most responsible for the establishment of the Tōdai-ji lineage of Kegon. Over time, Kegon incorporated esoteric ritual from Shingon Buddhism, with which it shared a cordial relationship. Its practice continues to this day, and includes a few temples overseas.
- source : wikipedia



. Toodaiji 東大寺 Todai-Ji - Nara .
and Priest 良弁僧正 Roben Sojo (689 - 773)
The temple is famous for its Kegon-E 華厳会 Kegon Rituals.

. Saint Myoe Shonin 明恵上人 (1173 - 1232) .
and temple 高山寺 Kozan-Ji

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- - - - - There are various temples named Kegon-Ji in Japan.

. Kegonji 華厳寺 temple Kegon-Ji .
岐阜県揖斐郡揖斐川町谷汲徳積 Tanigumi Hozumi, Ibigawa, Gifu


. Suzumushidera 鈴虫寺 / 妙徳山 Myotokuzan Kegon-Ji .
京都府京都市西京区松室地家町31 Kyoto

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Kegon Engi-E 華厳縁起絵 Picture Scroll of the Kegon sect

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Here is a painting of a large boat moving across a stormy sea on top the back of a fierce dragon. Can you believe that such a dynamic work was painted in Japan more than 750 years ago? This fantastic sight may seem amazing and mysterious, but perhaps you may be more surprised to learn that this dragon is actually the transformation of a beautiful woman named Shanmiao (J., Zenmyo).


Legends of the Kegon Sect, Scroll Three : (Kozan-ji)

Shanmiao was the daughter of a rich man, who lived in a port town in China during the Tang dynasty (618-907). She fell in love with a handsome Korean monk from Silla, Uisang (J., Gisho), who was studying Buddhism in China. One day, while begging for alms, Uisang happened to visit Shanmiao's house, where she confessed her love to him. Uisang tried to dissuade her: "I am a monk so I cannot accept your feelings for me. Please open your heart and transfer those feelings to support the Buddhist teachings instead."

Eventually, Uisang completed his studies and was about to return to Korea. Shanmiao, learning of this, gathered all the Buddhist utensils that she had been collecting and rushed to the harbor, but it was too late. The ship had already set sail into the distance. Seeing this, the distressed Shanmiao threw her Buddhist utensil box in the direction of the ship and jumped into the sea. She then miraculously transformed into a dragon and protected Uisang on his voyage home.

This painting comes from Legends of the Kegon Sect (also known as Illustrated Biographies of the Kegon Sect Patriarchs), in seven volumes, which tells of the patriarchs of the Buddhist Hwaeom (J., Kegon) sect in Korea, Uisang (625-702) and Weonhyo (J., Gangyo, 617-686), based on their entries in a Chinese collection of biographies on early eminent Buddhist priests. This set of illustrated handscrolls belongs to Kozan-ji, a temple renowned for its beautiful autumn leaves in Toganoo, located in northwest Kyoto, Japan. Kozan-ji was revived, at the beginning of the Kamakura period (1185-1333), as a training center for the Kegon sect in Japan by the influential monk Myoe (1173-1232), who is thought to have initiated the making of these handscrolls.

The long, continuous narrative style of emaki, or illustrated handscroll, effectively draws its viewers into the story. Here, too, this scene-the climax of Uisang's tale-develops rhythmically from Shanmiao grieving over Uisang's departure, casting her Buddhist utensil box into the sea, then plunging herself into the waves and transforming into the dragon. A heightened sense of anticipation gradually develops for the viewer.

This illustrated biography, which highlights the episode of Shanmiao's devotion to Uisang, perhaps reflects Myoe's admiration for Uisang and his wanting to become like the great Korean master with whom he shared similar spiritual views. Uisang's accomplishment of studying in China, which was Myoe's long, unfulfilled wish, and Uisang's gaining a female Buddhist adherent in China, appears to have left a strong impression on Myoe, who worshipped Shanmiao like a deity and held firm to be loyal like her. Uisang's biography explains the meaning of Shanmiao's miracle and is thought to been produced in order to reveal Myoe's feelings.

By the way, who do you think was Myoe's model for Shanmiao? In the first year of the Jokyu era (1221), after the shogun Minamoto no Sanetomo was assassinated and the Kamakura government experienced turmoil, the Retired Emperor Gotoba raised an army to overthrow the government. However, the government forces quickly brought down this revolt. This political struggle, known in Japanese history as the Jokyu Rebellion, led to the deaths of many courtiers in Kyoto, and during this time, many court women asked Myoe for help. Shanmiao may have represented these women to Myoe, and so he had them become nuns and built a temple named Zenmyo-ji (Shanmiao Temple), in which they could live. He may have also taught these women about Shanmiao's tale and converted them to the Kegon faith. We can imagine that these women, who lost their husbands in war, seeing this story, may have sympathized with Shanmiao and, through Myoe, devoted themselves to Buddhism.
- source : Kyoto National Museum - Junji Wakasugi, 1997-



華厳宗祖師絵伝 (華厳縁起)
小松茂美 Komatsu Shigemi (1925 - 2010)
Illustrated Legends of the Kegon Patriarchs

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- A scene from the scroll:

Two traveling monks were sleeping in a cave, not realizing this was in fact a grave.
The first night nothing happened, but on the second night, an Oni demon appeared in their dreams and attacked them.
(Dead human beings can turn into an Oni if they have left problems in this world that need to be solved.)


洞窟の中で鬼に襲われる夢を見る


. Onipedia - 鬼ペディア - Oni Demons - ABC-List - Index - .

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. Japanese Legends - 伝説 民話 昔話 – ABC-List .

During the Kegon-E 華厳会 Kegon ritual of painting eyes for the statue of the Great Buddha at the temple 東大寺 Todai-Ji an old man passing by, who had carried a bamboo basket with saba 鯖 mackerels was summoned to read the Kegon Sutra....
... The mackerels turned into 80 volumes of the 華厳経 Kegon Sutra....

- - - - - Read the full story here :
. saba no ki 鯖の木 the mackerel tree .


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. Japan - Shrines and Temples - Index .


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- - #kegon #kegonji #todaiji #kegonemaki -
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2017/08/10

hitokui Jizo man-eating

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- Jizo Bosatsu 地蔵菩薩 - ABC-List -
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hitokui Jizoo 人食い地蔵 Hitokui "man-eating" Jizo
積善院準提堂 Shakuzen-In Juntei-Do
京都市左京区吉田近衛町69 / 69 Yoshidakonoechō, Sakyō-ku, Kyōto

The official name of this Jizo is
Sutoku-In Jizoo 崇徳院地蔵

The pronunciation of Sutokuin changed to Hitokuin and
then finally to ひとくい Hitokui.

Written with Chinese characters, hitokui 人食い comes to mean "man-eating".


This Jizo has been venerated to appease the vengeful spirit of
. Sutoku Tenno, Sotoku 崇徳天皇 (1119 - 1142) .










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準提堂 Juntei-Do Hall is a hall dedicated to Juntei Kannon - 准胝観音 Jundei Kannon (Sunde) .

. Jundei Kannon, Juntei Kannon 准胝 観音 .
Within the six realms of existence, he saves mankind.

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. hitokui Ebisu 人喰いエビス man-eating Ebisu .


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- Jizo Bosatsu 地蔵菩薩 - Introduction -

. Pilgrimages to Jizo Bosatsu 地蔵菩薩 - 地蔵霊場 Jizo Reijo .

. Legends about Jizo Bosatsu - 地蔵菩薩 .




. Join the Jizo Bosatsu Gallery - Facebook .



. O-Mamori お守り Amulets and Talismans .

. Japan - Shrines and Temples - ABC List .


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- - - #jizohitokui #hitokuijizo #sutokuinjizo #sutokuin - - -
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2017/08/06

Taizan Fukun Hell King

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. Juu Oo 十王, Juo, Ju-O - 10 Ten Kings of Hell .
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Taizan Fukun 泰山府君 / 太山府君 King of Hell
Taizan-O 太山王(泰山王) King Taizan
Daizan oo 泰山王 Daizan-O (incarnation of 薬師如来 Yakushi Nyorai)




He is a subordinate of Enmaten 焔摩天 King of Hell.
In Taoism he is called
東嶽大帝(仁聖大帝)Togaku Taitei

He resides in hell and keeps the books where the length of each human life is recorded.


. Sekizan Zen-In 赤山禅院 - Kyoto .
The principal deity, 赤山大明神 Sekizan Daimyojin, "Red-Mountain Shining-Deity", is a brought-back avatar or a double image of Taizanfukun 泰山府君 (Taizan Fukun) in Mt. Sekizan in China
ema 絵馬 votive tablet of 泰山府君 Taizan Fukun




Taizan-ō, 泰山王 King of Hell, Judge in the 7th week, 49th day 七七日49日


- quote
Taizan Fukun - たいざん‐ふくん【泰山府君】 / 泰山王 Taizanoo
Taizan Fukun wird oft zusammen mit Emma als Paar neben einem Jizo Bosatsu dargestellt. In der wallenden Tracht eines chinesischen Richters der Sung-Zeit.
Meist sitzende Statuen mit furchterregendem Gesichtsausdruck. Er hält in der Hand ein Holzszepter mit zwei Köpfen auf einem Lotusblatt (jintoojoo, nintoojoo).

. 10 Höllenkönige (Jûô, juuoo, juo 十王) .
Gabi Greve



Seated statues are depicted with a wooden scepter holding two heads.
(This statue is from Todai-Ji.)


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- quote
泰山府君祭 Taizan Fukun no Sai
TRANSLATION:
the Taizan Fukun (Lord Taizan) ceremony
APPEARANCE:
Taizan Fukun no Sai is one of the most secret and powerful onmyōdō rituals. It is jealously guarded by the few who know it, and strongly coveted by those who don’t.
ORIGIN:
This spell was developed in ancient China by Taoist philosophers. It is named for Lord Taizan, the god of the mountain Taishan in Shandong, China and one of the kings of hell. He is one of the most important deities in Onmyōdō. In this ritual, the supplicant beseeches Lord Taizan, Great King Enma, and the other judges of Meido and Jigoku to lengthen a person’s life span, save someone from death, or even restore life to the dead. Gold, silver, silk, saddled horses, and human life—usually substitutes in the form of katashiro, or paper dolls—are offered to the gods. No mantras or magical worlds are spoken; the gods are simply invited to sit down and participate. A formal letter of request is read to them, detailing the offerings and the virtues of the supplicants, and the precise divine intervention desired.
The Abe clan was famous for their knowledge of this spell. It is one of the reasons they were able to maintain a monopoly on the imperial Bureau of Onmyōdō. Under their offices, this spell was routinely performed for the emperors in order to increase their life spans and protect the country.
LEGENDS:
Abe no Seimei is particularly famous for his use of Taizan Fukun no Sai. He resurrected his father, who was murdered by Ashiya Dōman, and used it many other times in the service of the emperor and country.
Once, a high ranking monk of Mii-dera known as Chikō fell gravely ill. It was determined that his illness was the result of karma, and thus could not be cured with medicine. Abe no Seimei was summoned. He divined Chikō’s fortune, and discovered that death was imminent. However, Abe no Seimei said that if someone was willing to trade life spans with Chikō, he could perform the Taizan Fukun no Sai and save the priest’s life.
The priests all looked at each other uncomfortably. As much as they loved and admired Chikō, nobody was willing to sacrifice his own life in order to save him. Finally, a young man named Shōkū—an average pupil who had been studying for many years yet had never attracted the attention of Chikō or the other teachers—stepped forward and offered his own life.
Abe no Seimei accepted the offer. He immediately performed the Taizan Fukun no Sai. Shōkū writhed in anguish, his life span shrinking away, while Chikō rapidly began to recover. Finally, Chikō was cured, and Shōkū lay on death’s door. As the young pupil’s last breath left his body, he prayed with all his heart to a nearby painting of Fudō Myōō. Just then, tears poured from the painted eyes of Fudō Myōō, and the god’s voice was heard:
“If you would take the place of your teacher, then let me take your place instead.”
Suddenly, Shōkū and Chikō sat up, both of then restored to life.
- source : yokai.com/taizanfukunnosai

. Abe no Seimei 阿倍晴明 (921 - 1005) .




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東嶽大帝(仁聖大帝)Togaku Taitei




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. O-Mamori お守り Amulets and Talismans .


. Fudō Myō-ō, Fudoo Myoo-Oo 不動明王 Fudo Myo-O
Acala Vidyârâja - Vidyaraja - Fudo Myoo .


. 薬師如来 Yakushi Nyorai 薬師如来 Bhaisajyaguru - ABC .


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. Japanese Legends - 伝説 民話 昔話 – ABC-List .

................................................................................. Fukui 福井県 
遠敷郡 Onyū - Onyu district 名田庄村 Natashomura

Osaizangitsune おさいざん狐 a fox named O-Saizan
On a rock above the shrine 加茂神社 Kamo Jinja there lives a 白狐 white fox called O-Saizan. He/she is the protector of Taizan Fukun.
The 狐の火の玉 fire ball of the fox can fly from 天壇 the heavenly abode of Taizan Fukun all the way to this Kamo Shrine.

加茂神社 Kamo Jinja
福井県大飯郡おおい町名田庄納田終127-4



After the Ōnin War 応仁の乱 Onin no Ran in 1467, members of 土御門家 the clan of Tsuchimmikado (from a branch-family of Abe no Seimei 阿倍晴明 (921 - 1005)) fled here. They were strong believers in the power of Kamo Jinja shrine in Kyoto and spread the belief in this shrine in the region.
In the village there are still many thatched-roof houses that have retained their form for centuries.


. Tsuchimikado, Tsuchi no Mikado 土御門天皇 (1196 – 1231) .
- reigned from 1198 to 1210.
- and the famous Onmyōji, Abe no Seimei 阿倍晴明 (921 - 1005)

. Kyoto - The Kamo Shrine complex .
Shimogamo Shrine 下鴨神社 and Kamigamo Shrine 上賀茂神社


. kitsune densetsu 狐 伝説 fox legends .

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- reference : Nichibun Yokai Database -

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. Japan - Shrines and Temples - Index .


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- - #taizanfukun #tsuchimikado #foxlegends -
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2017/07/02

Tama Henro Yakushi Temples

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. Tama Shikoku Henro 多摩四国八十八箇所 Pilgrimage .
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Tama Henro - Yakushi Nyorai Temples

There are 10 temples with Yakushi Nyorai as the main deity in the pilgrimage. They will be introduced here.
As the Buddha of Healing, Yakushi is very popular and his temples are well visited.

. 薬師如来 Yakushi Nyorai Bhaisajyaguru .


多摩八十八ヶ所霊場の案内 - homepage reference for each temple
- reference source : tesshow.jp/tama/tama... -

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03 Ikooin 井口院 Iko-In
神竜山 井口院 開空寺
新義真言宗 // 三鷹市上連雀7-26-26 / Mitaka, KamiRenjaku



The temple was constructed on request of 井口八郎左衛門春重 Iko Hachirozaemon Harushige, who was the first developer of the land around the village 石神井村 Shakujiimura. He called 清長和尚 priest Kiyonaga in 1672, who came from 中野宝仙寺 Nakano Hosen-Ji.

- 朱印 - stamp of the temple :


Nr. 70 at 関東八十八ヵ所霊場 Kanto Henro Pilgrimage


- - - - - 不動明王 Statue of Fudo Myo-O


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06 Jooshooji 常性寺 Josho-Ji
医王山 長楽院 常性寺
真言宗豊山派 // 調布市国領町1-2-8 Chōfu-shi, Kokuryōchō

The temple has been erected along the river Tamagawa in the Kamakura period. 祐仙法印 Priest Yusen got a copy of the Fudo statue from Narita and the temple is thus known as
調布不動尊 Chofu Fudo Son

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- - - - - goshuin 御朱印 stamp




Nr. 69 at 関東八十八ヵ所霊場 Kanto Henro Pilgrimage


Hotei of the 調布七福神の布袋尊 Chofu pilgrimage to the Seven Gods of Good Luck.



The seated statue of Yakushi is 二尺五寸 high.
also called Yakuo Nyorai 医王如来.

本堂には、薬師如来(金剛仏・丈二尺五寸)座像が安置されています。
薬師如来は、別名「医王如来」ともいい、医薬を司る仏様として仏の教えを聞き、悟りの道を実践することができるように、多くの人々のさまざまな心身の病を癒してきました。
- source : www.josyoji.jp -

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22 Fumonji 普門寺 Fumon-Ji
大悲山 清涼院 普門寺
新義真言宗 // 府中市宮町3-17-1 Fuchū-shi, Miyamachi

The founding of the temple in not clear, but in 1522 it has ben revived by 惠傳法印 Priest Eden.

The main statue beside Yakushi Nyorai is 観世音菩薩立像 Kannon Bosatsu.

- - - - - goshuin 御朱印 stamp


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25 Hooshooin 宝性院 Hosho-In
泰明山 寶性院 薬師寺 Yakushi-Ji
真言宗豊山派 // 府中市是政2-7-13 Fuchū-shi, Koremasa

Founded about 1660.

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29 Kokubunji 国分寺 Kokubun-Ji
医王山 / 醫王山 Iozan - 西勝院
真言宗豊山派 // 国分寺市西元町1-13-16 Kokubunji-shi, Nishimotomachi

The main statue beside Yakushi in 大日如来 Dainichi Nyorai.
Founded in the Nara period.
The 薬師堂 Yakushi Hall was built later by the 新田氏 Nitta clan.

- - - - - goshuin 御朱印 stamp


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34 Hoojuin 宝樹院 Hoju-In
慈光山 宝樹院
真言宗智山派 // 西東京市泉町2-7-25 Nishitōkyō-shi, Izumichō

Founded in 1711

- - - - - goshuin 御朱印 stamp


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42 Shinpukuji 真福寺 Shinpuku-Ji
龍華山 清浄光院 真福寺
真言宗豊山派 // 武蔵村山市中藤1-37-1  Musashimurayama-shi, Nakatō



Founded in 710 by 行基 Gyoki Bosatsu. The building was lost in 1220 through fire and rebuilt in 1260 by 瀧性法師.

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43 Yakuooji 薬王寺 Yakuo-Ji
医王山 薬王寺
真言宗豊山派 // 青梅市今井1-2520 Oume-shi, Imai



The temple was founded in 1339 by 法相宗の僧良誓.
The statue of Yakushi is said to be made by 聖徳太子 Shotoku Taishi. The 薬師堂 Yakushi Hall was built on request of Shogun Tokugawa Iemitsu in 1649.
The temple is famous for its azalea park.

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61 Shoofukuji 正福寺 Shofuku-Ji
今熊山 Imakumazan 正福寺 Shofuku-Ji
真言宗豊山派 // 八王子市上川町377 Hachioji, Kamikawamachi

Founded in 1364 by 重円上人 Saint Choin . The building was lost to fire in 1705 and 1844.
Related to the shrine 今熊神社 Imakuma Jinja.


painting of a dragon


- Legend of Mount Imakuma and 刈寄山 Mount Kariyoseyama in Oku-Tama -


source : toki.moo.jp/gaten..655..

The wife of 安閑天皇 Ankan Tenno (466 - 536), Empress 橘仲皇女 Tachibana no Nakatsu Himemiko, was lost and could not be found. Following a divination of the deities he went to pray at Mount Imakumasan and called out her name. And indeed, he found her. Since that time, the Shrine is famous for helping people to find lost ones and abducted children, by calling out the name of the missing.
yobawari yama 呼ばわり山
Not only humans, all kinds of missing or lost things can be found calling out the name of the item and waiting for an echo to come back.

At the back of the mountain shrine is a stone memorial 天狗の文字 for a Tengu - so maybe - it's this Tengu who abducts humans and takes away things, only to bring them back when called for it properly.
This story relates to the temple 正福寺 Shofuku-Ji and Saint Choin, who had come from 熊野本宮 Kumano Hongu, Wakayama

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今熊神社 Imakuma Jinja



今熊神社遥拝殿 背後の山が今熊山 - 朝日に輝く今熊神社本殿
今熊稲荷明神 Imakuma Inari Shrine
今熊神社中興の祖 鳳明線刻像 Saint Homei
今熊神社のミツバツツジ Rhododendron dilatetum
今熊神社獅子舞 Imakuma Shishimai lion dance


金剛ノ滝 Waterfall - 滝を見下ろす不動明王 Fudo Myo-O
- reference source : kawaguchitengou.sakura.ne.jp/imakumajinnja -

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76 Daigiji 大義寺 Daigi-Ji / Taigi-Ji
龍華山 Ryukazan 大義寺 Daigi-Ji
真言宗智山派 // 八王子市元横山町2-8-4 Hachioji, Motoyokoyamachō



Founded in 1336 by 徳翁法印  priest Tokuo Hoin .
- source : hachibutu.com/daigiji.html -


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. O-Mamori お守り Amulets and Talismans .

. Fudō Myō-ō, Fudoo Myoo-Oo 不動明王 Fudo Myo-O
Acala Vidyârâja - Vidyaraja - Fudo Myoo .


. 薬師如来 Yakushi Nyorai 薬師如来 Bhaisajyaguru - ABC .


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. Tama Shikoku Henro 多摩四国八十八箇所 Pilgrimage .


. Japan - Shrines and Temples - Index .


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- - #tamahenroyakushi #imakuma -
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2017/06/10

Kawanabe Kyosai Hell Paintings

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. jigokue, jigoku-e 地獄絵 paintings of hell .
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Kawanabe Kyoosai, Kawanabe Kyōsai 河鍋暁斎 Kawanabe Kyosai
Kawanabe Gyoosai, Kawanabe Gyōsai 河鍋暁斎 Gyosai

画鬼暁斎 Gaki Kyosai, the Demon of painting - as he called himself !

Kyōsai witnessed Japan transform from a feudal country into a modern state.

. Kawanabe Kyosai 河鍋暁斎 (1831 - 1889) .
- Introduction -
Paintings of Daruma, Fudo Myo-O ...
Kawanabe Kyosai Memorial Museum, Warabi, Saitama

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kisai 鬼才・河鍋暁斎 The Genius Kawanabe Kyosai - "Demon Genuius"

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Jigoku Dayu 地獄太夫がいこつの遊戯を夢に見る図 - Hell courtesan




Jigoku Dayu 地獄太夫 Hell courtesan and Ikkyu
Ikkyū, Ikkyu Sojun (1396-1481)


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The Deities of Good Luck throwing beans at the demons
Daikoku, Ebisu and O-Fuku

oni wa soto 鬼は外 "Demons, get out!" 「鬼は―外! 福は―内!」



. setsubun 節分 "seasonal divide" rituals .

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左甚五郎と京美人圖 Hidari Jingoro and a Kyoto Beauty
detail of a folding screen / 左甚五郎と京美人図

. Hidari Jingoroo 左甚五郎 Hidari Jingoro .
skilfull artist, sculptor and carpenter

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'Kyosai Hyaku-zu' 狂斎百図 - One Hundred Pictures by Kyosai


- CLICK for more photos ! -


- quote -
Oni no inu ma ni sentaku (Doing the Laundry While the Demon is Away)
This original Kawanabe Kyosai (Gyosai) woodcut is printed on nineteenth century Japanese mulberry (rice) paper and with full margins as published by Okura Magobei between 1881 - 1886 in the Kyosai Hyakuzu, 'Kyosai Hyaku-zu' (One Hundred Pictures by Kyosai).
It depicts scenes from Japanese folklore & proverbs dealing with household chores, games & demons (Yokai & Oni). The image is constructed by means of two horizontal subjects, the first scene contains a Japanese proverb or expression (Kotowaza), that reads; "Oni no inu ma ni sentaku" which loosely translates to (Doing the Laundry While the Demon is away) or (When the cat is away, the mice will play). The scene depicts a woman washing clothes and a large cat sitting nearby while a grumpy old man goes out for a walk.
The Japanese proverb for he lower scene reads; "Oya ni ninu ko wa oni no ko" which translates to (A child that does not resemble its parents is a Demon Child). Depending on the context, this expression can refer to a child who is misbehaving and is not adapting to the family expectations or it may refer to a simple children's game known as hide and seek. Here the artist depicts children at play, a mother, with her naked child wrapped around her shoulders, chasing a diminutive demon, who in turn is chasing after several frightened children. However, the expression of laughter on the mother's face as she grabs at the little red demon, indicates that it is all in fun. Laughter, in fact, appears to be the connecting link within these delightful and bizarre scenes.
- source : artoftheprint.com/artistpages/kyosai -




..... scenes from Japanese folklore and proverbs dealing with household chores, games and demons (Yokai and Oni).
from the series 'Kyosai Hyaku-zu' 狂斎百図 - One Hundred Pictures by Kyosai.
. . . CLICK here for more Photos !


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暁斎百鬼画談 Kyosai - tales and paintings of 100 demons
“Kyosai's One Hundred Scary Illustrated Tales”









- CLICK for more photos ! -

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- book references : Kyosai at amazon com -


Night Parade Of Hell Creatures: Bizarre Demonic Art By Kyosai
by Jack Hunter (Editor), Kawanabe Kyosai (Artist)



Kawanabe Kyosai (1831-89) was only 6 years old when he joined the school of the great ukiyo-e master Utagawa Kuniyoshi, along with such fellow pupils as Yoshitoshi, who followed him in 1850. Later Kyosai studied traditional Japanese painting at the Kano school. As befits this varied apprenticeship, Kyosai would embrace many styles and methods during his artistic career. His eclectic approach may also be partly attributable to a legendary sake-drinking habit, which could account for the more bizarre extremes of his chosen subject matter - in particular, weird demons and the bloody tortures of Hell. Kyosai can now be regarded as not only one of the last true ukiyo-e masters, but also as one of the first truly modernist painters of Japan.

"Night Parade Of Hell Creatures", edited by Jack Hunter (who also edited the ground-breaking extreme ukiyo-e anthology "Dream Spectres”), collects and considers over 100 of Kyosai's most innovative, demented and bizarre images - including multiple yokai, ghosts and demons - presented in large-format and full-colour throughout.


- CLICK for more photos ! -


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Yokai Wars: Demonic Manga by Kyosai
by Kawanabe Kyosai (Author, Illustrator)



"Yokai Wars" is a special art ebook which collects two of Kyosai's most complete sets of colour sketches themed around demons, monsters, devil-animals, and visions of Hell. These 52 images, dating from 1879 and 1889, showcase the artist's deranged vision at its most inventive, delirious, darkly humorous and at times sadistic.



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画鬼 暁斎 Gaki Kyosai and Josiah Conder




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Hell in Japanese Art
by Ryouji Kajitani, Naoki Nishida (Authors), Kazuya Takaoka (Designer)



This art book showcases a wide collection of depictions of hell in Japanese art from the 12th century to the 19th century. The single-volume collection focuses primarily on works designated as Japanese National Treasures or Important Cultural Properties and features the various depictions of hell by prominent artists such as Kazunobu Kano, Nichōsai 耳鳥斎 Nichosai, Yoshitoshi Tsukioka and Kyosai Kawanabe.
This volume also features the 19th century woodblock-printed edition of "Ojoyoshu" The Essentials of Rebirth in the Pure Land) written by the medieval Buddhist monk Genshin (942-1017) and is accompanied by modern bilingual text. ... These ideas of hell in "Ojoyoshu" have played an enduring role in inspiring Japanese Buddhist paintings and other subsequent texts, particularly from the medieval period onward, and are vividly portrayed in the painting featured in this volume.


. The Ōjōyōshū 往生要集 The Essentials of Rebirth in the Pure Land .
Genshin 源信  (942-1017), Eshin Soozu 恵心僧都 Eshin Sozu

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Demon of painting: the art of Kawanabe Kyōsai
Though ghosts and demons do not exist in this world, the artist Kawanabe Kyōsai proved his artistic worth in his paintings depicting them ...
Kawanabe Kyosai: Beauty and Demon Queller
Kawanabe Kyōsai's Bake-Bake Gakkō (化々學校), or 'School for Spooks' (1872) ... In a classroom full of demons we can see a desk that has sprouted legs ...
... an episode from the life of Shaka (Skt: Sakyamuni), the historical Buddha, the attack of the demon king Mara ...
- reference : kawanabe kyosai demons -


- - kawanabe kyōsai on facebook - -

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蝿虎即暁斎のかみつき貌

高澤良一 Takazawa Ryoichi


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. Japan - Shrines and Temples - Index .


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