2017/12/31

Welcome to Paradise !

[ . BACK to DARUMA MUSEUM TOP . ]
::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::


Welcome to Gokuraku 極楽 the Buddhist Paradise !

I will try and introduce information about the life of Shakyamuni Buddha
and a glossary of terms, many of them are kigo for Japanese haiku.

Paradise, Heaven 極楽 gokuraku and Hell 地獄  jigoku

ano yo あの世 the other world
haraiso はらいそ paradise (paraiso)
higan 彼岸 the other shore
joodo 浄土 Paradise of Amida
ka no yo かの世 the other world
. meido 冥土 冥途 the other world / yomi 黄泉 "the yellow springs" .
paradaisu パラダイス paradise, Paradies
raise 来世 afterlife, the world to come
rakuen 楽園 paradise, earthly paradise
shigo no sekai 死後の世界 the world after death
takai 他界 to die, to pass into the other world
tengoku 天国 heaven
tenjoo 天上 "up there", heaven

. toogen 桃源 Shangri-La シャングリラ, Arcadia, Eden - Toogenkyoo 桃源郷 fairyland, .
桃源郷 lit. Peach Blossom Valley

. Tokoyo no Kuni 常世国, 常世の国 The Eternal Land (of Shintoism) .
yomi 黄泉 the yellow springs, die Gelben Quellen
yuutopia ユートピア Utopia


And in the limbo toward the other world here are a lot of vengeful spirits, monsters and goblins.


jigoku 地獄 Buddhist hell - Introduction
. naraku ならく / 奈落 hell, hades .


. Pilgrimages in Japan - Introduction .


. - - - Glossary of Terms - - - . - not yet in the ABC index.



Your comments and help are most welcome!

Gabi Greve
GokuRakuAn 極楽庵, Japan


. Gokuraku Joodoo 極楽浄土 Gokuraku Jodo, Paradise in the West of Amida Nyorai .






. Reference, LINKS - General Information .


- - - - - ABC search of this blog - - - - -

- AAA - / - BBB - / - CCC - / - DDD - / - EEE -

- FFF - / - GGG - / - HHH - / - I I I - / - JJJ -

- KK KK - / - LLL - / - MMM - / - NNN - / - OOO -

- PPP - / - QQQ - / - RRR - / - SSS - / - TTT -

- UUU - / - VVV - / - WWW - / - XXX - / - YYY - / - ZZZ -

::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::





. Join the Jizo Bosatsu Gallery - Facebook .






. Join the Kannon Bosatsu Gallery on facebook .

under construction - please come back!
::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

[ . BACK to DARUMA MUSEUM . TOP . ]
[ . BACK to WORLDKIGO . TOP . ]

::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

2017/12/29

General Information

[ . BACK to DARUMA MUSEUM TOP . ]
::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

General Information and Reference


- - - - - - - - - - Latest Additions - - -

. Darumapedia - Temples and Gokuraku .

....................................................................................................................................................



A Tourist Guidebook to Paradise  
GokuRaku no Kankoo Annai 極楽の観光案内 by 西村公朝 Nishimura Kocho



::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

- - - - - - - - - - External LINKS - - -


Buddhism in Japan - Buddha Statues - an extensive guide

A-TO-Z PHOTO DICTIONARY
source : Mark Schumacher



Buddhist Art News - Japan
News on Buddhist art, architecture, archaeology, music, dance, and academia.
- source : buddhistartnews.wordpress.com




地獄と極楽がわかる本 - to understand hell and heaven
source : futabasha.co.jp

..............................................................................................................................................

A Cultural History of Japanese Buddhism
William E. Deal, Brian Ruppert




- quote -
Review by Jonathan Ciliberto
Intended for “upper-level undergraduate and graduate students as well as scholars,” A Cultural History of Japanese Buddhism fills a gap by presenting largely recent work of Japanese and Western scholars on Japanese Buddhism. The authors consider prior books on Buddhist cultural history as largely from Indian and Tibetan viewpoints. The particular presumptions, intellectual models, or even prejudices of such positions (e.g., to view Japanese Buddhism as a distant reflection, or a corruption, of a continental original) are seen as obstacles to an accurate history of Buddhism’s influence and interaction with Japan.

The great value of the book is to direct readers to approaches and theories perhaps overlooked by more general histories of Buddhism. Each chapter includes its own bibliography and notes, making the book useful for study of narrow sections of Japan’s history.

Published in 2015, many summaries of and citations to recent scholarship are incorporated. Although a relatively short volume (~200 pages, absent notes and biolographies), it includes a great deal of purely historical information surrounded by “cultural history,” covering Japan from protohistory to the present. The book includes a character glossary.

Some themes that run through the book are: that Buddhism in Japan was not a monolithic “ism,” and that individual sects were not exclusive of one another but rather interacted in practice and doctrine; the complex interaction of indigenous religion with Buddhism; Buddhist lineages in Japan as the agents of cultural influence (e.g., “lineages had already begun to pursue the possibility of an ultimate deity”).

Many chapters include subsections on women and gender in Japanese Buddhism, including a fascinating section on the link between literary salons “established in women’s circles” and often held within monasteries and creating an environment for “the evolving and intimate connection between monastic Buddhists and their lay supporters” (102-4). More generally, these sections illustrate the important influence of women on Japanese Buddhism throughout its history. The book also devotes substantial attention to religion in Japan in the modern period, a much-needed resource.

One instance of a simplification of Japanese history that the authors seek to correct is the view that Shinto and Buddhism remained largely separate strands. While the doctrine of honji-suijaku is relatively well-known, the book reveals in greater depth the complex interplay between the two religions by reference to the writings of recent (and less-recent) scholars.

Another attempt to reveal subtlety beyond a stock scholarly view concerns (in the Heian period) the “limitations of the ‘rhetoric of decadence’ [that] some scholars attribute to ‘old’ Buddhism”. The authors offer Minamoto no Tamenori’s (d. 1101) Sanbo’e as an attempt “to incorporate other parts of the populace” beyond the aristocracy. This undercuts the claim that “practitioners of the ‘old’ Buddhism were completely unconcerned with those outside their walls” as a cause of the emergence of “religious heroes” (like Kukai and Nichiren) (88-90). (That said, the ongoing theme of Japanese Buddhists, unsatisfied with the quality of teaching in Japan, who sought original texts and more authoritative teachers in China, does support the basis of a kind of “decadent” Buddhism.)

It is important to have a sense of what “cultural history” is, or what it intends to do, before considering the authors’ approach to a history Japanese Buddhism. Given that cultural history includes an extremely wide set of approaches, determining the present authors’ use of it as a method is largely about picking out strands from the mass of possibilities. (One author refers to “the notorious difficulty of organizing the disorderly profusion of intradisciplinary, cross-disciplinary, and varying national-intellectual meanings and understandings of the “culture concept” into anything resembling consensual form” [Geoffrey Eley, “What Is Cultural History?”, New German Critique, No. 65, Cultural History/Cultural Studies, Spring – Summer, 1995, pp. 19-36].)

While the authors don’t set out their approach, generally in the present volume they tend to consider Buddhism in Japan less in terms of its religious or spiritual character or content and more as a generator of social and political forms. Or, rather, it is unspoken that religion was the driving force in developing myriad cultural effects in Japan, but the book doesn’t linger on religion itself, as it does on these effects.

It is unclear whether this approach is based on the position described by the scholar of medieval Japanese Buddhism Bernard Faure when he refers to an “absolute standpoint” as a “contradiction in terms” (Faure, Visions of Power (2000), 9). (Faure is frequently cited in A Cultural History of Japanese Buddhism.) That is: there are no “religious” standpoints motivating individuals, in terms of absolute or ideal concepts, or at least that taking direction from such standpoints is delusional.

Faure’s view (following from Le Goff) is that “literary and artistic works of art (and, in the case of religion, ritual practice) do no represent any eternal, unitary reality, but rather are the products of the imagination of those who produce them” (Faure, 10, emphasis added). A similar view of religion advocates a “History of Religions approach – trying to figure out how and why certain forms of religiosity took shape the way they did instead of assuming that it was religious experience that made religion” (Alan Cole, Fathering Your Father (2009), xi).

Thus, Faure and historians who follow his approach write religious history absent of religion as an internal activity, aimed at self-improvement, transcendental, or altruistic. Or perhaps this approach simply considers individual “religious” experiences too personal, too psychologically opaque, to form the basis of historical inquiry, and thus discards consideration of such experiences as “religious” in nature, and instead consider them in mainly terms of materiality and politics.

The authors of A Cultural History of Japanese Buddhism follow more directly the historian Kuroda Toshio’s sociopolitical functionalist approach. While occasionally offering descriptions of Buddhist practice and doctrine, the book largely focuses on: state-control over and connection with Buddhism in Japan (“Buddhism was firmly controlled by the state” during the early period (66)); art as narrative or purely visual, rather than a function of practice (99); Buddhist practice as a means of gaining influence or power at court, and the claim that “undoubtably” the introduction of esoteric lineages was related to the royal court’s interest in such power(106); that the court drove ritual (“Pivotal organizational and philosophical changes begin to arise in the royal court with the consolidation of the annual court ceremonies” (88, 106)).

Throughout, the authors take pains to connect influential Buddhists with the court: “The Daigoji halls, like those in other major monasteries, primarily housed scions of Fujiwara and Minamoto heritage” (107); “The Shingon lineages, from a very early point, […] had a special connection with the royal line” (108); “the intimate association between Tendai’s Enryakuji (Hiei) and the leading Fujiwaras” (108). Every monk who was a member of a royal family is identified in such a manner.

The author’s de-emphasis on “religious” explanations for religious history in Japan is intended to counterbalance writers who rely too much on such explanations. Citing the notable effect of D.T. Suzuki’s presentation of Zen Buddhism to the West (absurdist, gnomic, iconoclastic), and pointing out that “few Japanese Zen adherents, except those in the modern period and particularly those with access to the writings of Suzuki translated into Japanese” would recognize it, the author’s more social-science approach finds some justification. (146-7).

Performance theory is connected with the authors’ approach. A Cultural History of Japanese Buddhism doesn’t lay any groundwork for the reader as to what the doctrine or technique of applying performance theory are. It is a notoriously amorphous field of inquiry. One description of the approach states that “the performative nature of societies around the world, how events and rituals as well as daily life [are] all governed by a code of performance,” and one sees how this aligns with Deal and Ruppert’s approach in the present volume: religious acts are not generated by authenticity, but rather are ritualized and “for show.” Performance theory is difficult to understand as contributing much to an analysis of history, since all human action is outward, and thus all actions are, in a literal sense, “performed.” The negative application of the theory is applied in the present volume: performance theory supports the strategy of avoiding examination the motivations, hearts, or minds of individual in Japanese Buddhist history.

This is a strategy for writing history, and indicates the above-mentioned scholarly caution, perhaps, but also it tends to paint individuals as acting according to a plan (or with hindsight), rather than by caprice, calling, sincerity, compassion, or irrationality. Perhaps it doesn’t matter, in terms of cultural history, whether or not an effect was caused by religion or some other motivation, but only that the effect did occur.

With regard to Buddhist art, the authors acknowledge – particularly as to poetry – that the “undoubted” motivation for including Buddhist themes was a recognition of the contrast between non-attachment and the “intoxication of those who made use of or found beauty in the linguistic arts” (102). Oddly – although in keeping with the author’s “non-religious” approach to religious art – the idea that such an aesthetic intoxication is meant exactly to advance individuals’ practice (e.g., through visualization) is never mentioned, with respect to poetry or any other art form.
- source : Buddhist Art News -

- reference -

..............................................................................................................................................


CLICK for more books !


::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::


BUDDHISM & SHINTŌISM IN JAPAN
A-TO-Z PHOTO DICTIONARY OF JAPANESE RELIGIOUS SCULPTURE & ART

- source : Mark Schumacher



Digital Dictionary of Buddhism - 電子佛教辭典 / Edited by A. Charles Muller
sign in as guest
- source : www.buddhism-dict.ne

::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

[ . BACK to DARUMA MUSEUM . TOP . ]
[ . BACK to WORLDKIGO . TOP . ]
- #books #links #reference -
::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

2016/08/18

Buzenbo Tengu

[ . BACK to DARUMA MUSEUM TOP . ]
. Tengupedia - 天狗ペディア - Tengu ABC-Index .
:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

Buzenboo, Buzenbō 豊前坊 Buzenbo, Buzen-Bo Tengu
彦山豊前坊 - Hikozan Buzenbo, Fukuoka


. Hikosan 英彦山 / 彦山 Hikosan Shrines, Fukuoka and Oita .
英彦山 ひこさん - the old spelling is 彦山.
The main deity of the mountain is Hikosan Gongen 彦山権現.
Hikosan shinkō 英彦山信仰 Beliefs and practices associated with Mt Hiko
The shrine-temple complex known as Hikosan Gongen became Hikosan Shrine, the Buzenbō became Takanushi Shrine, and Hannyakutsu became Tamaya Shrine.
Gongen of the Twelve Places (Hikosan jūnisho gongen)
wakudo iwa わくど岩 the Frog Rock



Buzenbo is a shrine hall on the north-east side of Mount Hiko.
豊前坊 高住神社

栃の実のつぶて颪や豊前坊
tochi no mi no tsubute oroshi ya Buzenboo

chestnuts fall
like stones blown by the strong wind -
Buzenbo Hall


. Sugita Hisajo 杉田久女 .
Hisajo liked the area and even climbed to the peak of the mountain.

There is a large chestnut tree near this memorial stone.



Hikosan no garagara 英彦山のガラガラ
clay bell clapper against insects

They are a kind of clay bell (Hikosan dorei 英彦山土鈴), said to be the oldest ones used by the Shugendo ascetics.


Some even had a Tengu goblin mask on the bell.


There are three famous HIKO mountains 彦山 in Japan:

Formerly "Hiko" was written with the characters 日子, meaning "child of the sun"; in the first half of the ninth century, during the reign of the Emperor Saga, it was changed to the single character 彦, and then again to 英彦, its present designation, in 1729, at the order of the Retired Emperor Reigen. According to the Kamakura-period Hikosan ruki, the Gongen of the Three Places of Mt Hiko (Hikosan sansho gongen) was composed of Mt Zokutai in the south (Shaka), Mt Hottai in the north (Amida) and Mt Nyotai in the center (Thousand-armed Kannon).

. Hikosan Jinja 英彦山神社 .
Hikosan is the second highest mountain in Fukuoka.

:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::


source : nichibun.ac.jp/YoukaiGazou
一魁齋芳年(月岡芳年)

彦山豊前坊。眉毛が濃く、目玉は丸い。鼻は大きく、頬と顎にひげを生やしている。白い上着と袴を身に着け、青と白の結袈裟を掛けている。のけぞって、やや上方に目を向けている。

:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::



- quote -
彦山豊前坊はどこからやって来た?
豊前国の田川郡(福岡県)と中津市(大分県)の境にある英彦山(ひこさん/古くは彦山)は古代からの霊山(神体山)で、熊野の大峰山、出羽の羽黒山とともに「日本三大修験山」に数えられます。
ご祭神の天忍穂耳命がアマテラスの息子であることから、「アマテラス=日(太陽)」の「子」で「日子(ひこ)山」と呼ばれ、それが彦山、英彦山となったということです。
- source : fushigi-chikara.jp/sonota -

..............................................................................................................................................



- quote -
「日の子と天狗の山・英彦山」
修験道と天狗の山、英彦山。新潟県の弥彦山、兵庫県の雪彦山とともに「日本三彦山」に数えられています。日の子である神をまつっていたので「日子山」。それがヒコサンになり彦山に。さらに江
戸時代天皇から「英」尊号を受けて英彦山になりました。ここには日本を代表する天狗、豊前坊もいます。
・大分県中津市と福岡県添田町とにまたがる。
- Read the longer explanation here:
- source : toki.moo.jp/gaten -

..............................................................................................................................................



天狗のご神体
北九州合馬地区護聖寺、三岳城主長野氏が菩提寺として国東泉福寺の和尚を招き開山。
国東の神仏習合に同じく、裏手に神社がご神体はなんと天狗さん、
「英彦山豊前坊」が神人となって現れたという。
- source : Kazuto facebook -

..............................................................................................................................................


- quote
The Momoyama period daimyo 大名 Kobayakawa Takakage 小早川隆景 (1532-90)
supposedly held dialogues with the tengu king Buzenbou 豊前坊 (Buzenbo) on Mt. Hiko 彦.
The Tengu of Mout Hiko appears out of the mist to enlighten the swordsman Kobayakawa Takakage, in this print by Yoshitoshi.


(Print featured at the Yoshitoshi Ukiyo-e Web Gallery in the Ghost Series).
小早川隆景彦山ノ天狗問答之図


Says Goodin:
“What I found most interesting was that the scene was shown from the tengu's perspective, that is, from his side of the mist. Through breaks in the mist, Kobayakawa can be seen sitting composed ready to receive the tengu's message while his men recoil in fear.”
- source : Mark Schumacher


Kobayakawa Takakage 小早川 隆景 (1533 – July 26, 1597)
a samurai retainer of Toyotomi Hideyoshi during Japan's Sengoku period, and the son of Mōri Motonari. Adopted by the head of the Kobayakawa clan, Takakage took his name, and succeeded his adoptive father to become head of the Kobayakawa clan following his death in 1545.
As head of the Kobayakawa clan, he expanded the clan's territory in the Chūgoku region (western Honshū), and fought for the Mōri clan in all their campaigns; for a time, he also opposed both the great warlords Oda Nobunaga and Toyotomi Hideyoshi. He later swore loyalty to Hideyoshi, however, and entered his service; he was then awarded domains in Iyo Province on Shikoku and Chikuzen Province on Kyūshū, totalling 350,000 koku.
Takakage took part in Hideyoshi's invasions of Shikoku, Kyūshū, and Korea, and adopted Kobayakawa Hideaki, formerly an adopted son of Hideyoshi, and named him successor to the clan.
- source : wikipedia -

:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::



¨天狗部隊¨を紹介致します- 航空自衛隊 築城基地
尾翼には天狗のマーク
- Look at airplanes with this Tengu in Fukuoka
- reference : minkara.carview.co.jp -

:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

. . . CLICK here for Photos - 豊前坊 !
- reference : buzenbo tengu -

:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::


. - - - Join my Tengupedia friends on facebook ! - - - .

:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::


. 四十八天狗 - 48 famous Tengu of Japan .

. Tengu 天狗と伝説 Tengu legends "Long-nosed Goblin" .

. - yookai, yōkai 妖怪 Yokai monsters - .

. Legends and Tales from Japan 伝説 - Introduction .

. Mingei 民芸 Regional Folk Art from Japan .

- #buzenbo #buzenbotengu #hikozan #hikosan #fukuoka -
:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

[ . BACK to DARUMA MUSEUM TOP . ]
[ . BACK to WORLDKIGO . TOP . ]

:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

2016/08/16

Saburo Tengu Iizuna

[ . BACK to DARUMA MUSEUM TOP . ]
. Tengupedia - 天狗ペディア - Tengu ABC-Index .
:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

Saburoo, Saburō 三郎天狗 Saburo Tengu
飯綱三郎天狗 Izuna Saburo Tengu


He is quite popular and represented in many illustrations.
He lives on Mount Iizunayama 飯砂山 / 飯綱山 in Nagano.
Also known as Iizuna Gongen 飯綱権現 he is worshiped at many mountains.
Izuna Gongen is depicted as a beaked, winged figure with snakes wrapped around his limbs, surrounded by a halo of flame, riding on the back of a fox and brandishing a sword.
- quote wikipedia -


CLICK for more photos !

- quote
Mount Iizuna (飯縄山 Iizuna-yama),
also known as Mount Izuna (飯綱山 Izuna-yama), is a mountain located ten kilometers north-northwest of the heart of Nagano, Nagano Prefecture, Japan. Together with Mount Reisenji (霊仙寺山 Resenji-yama?), Mount Menō (瑪瑙山 Menō-yama), and others, it forms the Iizuna range. It has an elevation of 1,917 metres.

This mountain is a sacred site for mountain-based religious sects such as Shugendo, and said to be the home of a tengu named Saburō. According to legend, there was once a strange, edible sand somewhere on the mountain, which the tengu would distribute in times of poor harvest.
- source : wikipedia


. Iizuna Gongen, Izuna no Gongen 飯網の権現 .
- Introduction -
This is an incarnation of the Fox Deity, Inari. People pray to him for a bountiful harvest and good luck in business. He looks like a Tengu, a long-nosed goblin.
Some Yamabushi sects thin Iizuna (Izuna) is the original Japanese form (honji) of Fudo Myo-0, especially at Mt. Takao near Tokyo.



Iizuna Daigongen 飯縄大権現 Izuna Daigongen
. Mount Takao, 薬王院 Yakuo-In .

..............................................................................................................................................

- quote -
Tengu Saburō 天狗三郎 of Mt. Iizuna 飯綱山 in Nagano Prefecture. Also known as Izuna Gongen 飯網権現, Izuna Saburō, Mishima Daimyōgi, Izuna Myōjin, Daitengu Saburō, Izuna-Atago, Akiba Gongen, Sanshakubō Gongen, Akiba Daitengu. The Izuna cult is first mentioned in the Kamakura-era text Asabashō 阿婆縛抄 (1279) and associated with Togakushi Temple 戸隠神社 in Nagano prefecture. Izuna Gongen is also enshrined at Yakuōin Temple 薬王院 on Mt. Takao 高尾山 (in Hachiōji, Tokyo). Typically depicted in artwork as a Tengu riding atop a white fox.
Dōryō Gongen 道了権現 at the temple Saijo-ji.



Izuna Saburō Tengu 飯綱三郎天狗 (aka Daimyō Tengu Izuna Saburō 大妙天狗飯綱三郎, Izunasan Gongen 伊豆山権現, or Hashiriyu Gongen 走湯権現) is the guardian deity of sacred Mt. Izusan 伊豆山 (a Shugendō site from around the Kamakura period) said to reside at a hot spring on Izusan in Shizuoka prefecture. Over time the deity was linked with Hakone Gongen 箱根権現 and Kōrai Gongen 高麗権現 -- the three are considered one and the same.
In the Meiji period, when Buddhism and Shintōism were forcibly separated by the government, Izusan became a holy Shintō site and many of its Buddhist treasures were lost or scattered. Izusan Gongen is the Shintō manifestation of the Buddhist deity Senju Kannon 千手観音 (1000-armed Kannon).

Iconographically, Izuna Gongen is usually depicted in the form of a tengu [a mythical winged demon with long nose believed to live deep in the mountains], and riding upon a white fox, a depiction resembling that of the deity Akiba Gongen [Sanshaku Gongen]. Sanjakubō (三尺坊) of Mount Akiba Since Akiba Gongen is also believed to have originated in the Mt. Izuna and Togakushi area, the two deities are obviously closely related. Since the Buddhist counterpart (honji or "original essence"; see honji suijaku) of Izuna Gongen is said to be the bodhisattva Jizō (Sk. Ksitigarbha), the cult displays a mutual influence with the Atago cult (which involved an amalgamation with Shōgun Jizō or "Jizō of victory"). As a result, the deities are often referred to by the conjoined name Izuna-Atago.

The cult of Tengu Saburō is first mentioned in the Kamakura-era text Asabashō 阿婆縛抄 (1279), and Akibasan Sanshakubō 秋葉山三尺坊 (Nagano),
- - - - - - Continue reading
- source : Mark Schumacher -

..............................................................................................................................................


source : blog.goo.ne.jp/yorezo/e
飯綱三郎(イイヅナ サブロウ) Iizuna Saburo

- - - - - and more photos from
飯縄神社 Iizuna Jinja

..............................................................................................................................................

- quote -
Izuna Gongen
A kami worshiped by practitioners of the Izuna shugen cult. Also called Izuna Myōjin, this kami is enshrined in the Izuna Shrine at the summit of Mt. Izuna in the district of Kamiminochi, Nagano Prefecture. The Izuna cult first appears historically in the second part of the Kamakura-period work Asaba- shō (1279), where the name of Mount Izuna is seen in the legendary origins of the temple Togakushi-dera. Based on this entry, the cult is believed to have first spread among ascetic practitioners (shugen) at Togakushi. Later, however, the cult became increasingly independent in the form of Izuna shugen, and in the Muromachi period it was led by a famous pilgrim guide (sendatsu) named Sennichi Tayū.

Iconographically, Izuna Gongen is usually depicted in a form resembling that of a tengu (a mythical winged demon with long nose believed to live deep in the mountains), and riding upon a white fox, a depiction resembling that of the deity Akiba Gongen (Sanshaku Gongen). Since Akiba Gongen is also believed to have originated in the Mt. Izuna and Togakushi area, the two deities are obviously closely related. Since the Buddhist counterpart (honji or "original essence"; see honji suijaku) of Izuna Gongen is said to be the bodhisattva Jizō (Sk. Ksitigarbha), the cult displays a mutual influence with the Atago cult (which involved an amalgamation with Shōgun Jizō or "Jizō of victory"). As a result, the deities are often referred to by the conjoined name Izuna-Atago.

The Izuna cult also underwent combination from an early period with the cult of the Buddhist deity Dakini (Sk. Dakini), and a kind of magical technique was adopted from the medieval period involving the use of foxes as spirit familiars. This belief spread even among members of the court and warriors; the deputy shogun Hosokawa Masamoto (1466-1507) was known to have practiced the Izuna-Atago techniques (ref., Ashikaga kiseiki, Jūhen Ōninki), and the imperial regent Kujō Tanemichi (1509-1097) is likewise said to have studied Izuna practices (ref., Matsunaga Teitoku, Taionki). Such practices involving on the control of spirit familiars of foxes (kitsune tsukai) later came to be called izuna tsukai.

The Izuna cult came to be associated with military arts as well, and Takeda Shingen and Uesugi Kenshin are known to have shown strong devotion to Izuna Gongen as a martial tutelary. The school of Japanese fencing called Shintō Munenryū is also said to have originated at Mt. Izuna. In addition to Mt. Izuna in Nagano, Izuna Gongen can be found enshrined at Yakuōin on Mt. Takao (in Hachiōji, Tokyo), Hinagadake in Gifu, and Mt. Izuna in Sendai. The Izuna Gongen of Sendai goes by the name Izuna Saburō, and is particularly well known as one of the "three tengū of Japan."
Some scholars have suggested that belief in this tengu was responsible for the Izuna cult.
- reference source : Kokugakuin - Ito Satoshi -


. Dakini Ten 荼枳尼天 Vajra Daakini.

..............................................................................................................................................

Tengu no mugimeshi 天狗の麦飯 boiled barley and rice of the Tengu

- quote -
Untersuchungen über “Tengu-no-Mugimeshi”,
ein in der Natur massenhaft auftretendes, aus einem Kapselbacterium und einigen anderen Mikroorganismen bestehendes Klümpchen.


Bearbeitet von T. KAWAMURA nach den vom verewigt. Verf. hinterlassenen Handschriften
Naoye Ono
- source : jstage.jst.go.jp/article -



source : toki.moo.jp/gaten/651-700/gate669

北信・飯縄山の天狗の麦飯 Tengu from Iizunayama having lunch eating rice with barley.
The origin of the word Iizuna is 飯砂 "cooked rice sand".
It is also called 、飯粒・飯砂・餓鬼の飯, rice for the demons.
The Tengu use a ritual called 「飯縄の法」 to prepare food for themselves and the humans.



テングノムギメシ(天狗の麦飯)Tengu no Mugimeshi
... from 10 different kinds of moss
10種類程度の真正細菌の集合体で、Ktedonobacteria 綱 Ktedonobacterales 目、γ-proteobacteria 綱 Ellin307/WD2124、α-proteobacteria 綱 Beijerinckiaceae/Methylocystaceae,Acidobacteria 門 subdiv. など
- reference : wikipedia -


. Kobayashi Issa 小林一茶 in Edo .

神風や飯を掘出す秋の山
kamikaze ya meshi o hori-dasu aki no yama

divine wind--
digging up moss
on the autumn mountain


Literally, kamikaze refers to a "providential wind," the "wind of the gods." Long after Issa's time, the word was used to describe suicide planes packed with explosives that pilots flew into enemy ships.
According to Kazuhiko Maruyama in his edition of Shichiban nikki (Tokyo: Iwanami, 2.440), Issa is referring to tengu no mugimeshi ("Tengu's boiled barley and rice"): a kind of moss grows in volcanic soil.
Tr. and comment : David Lanoue


.......................................................................

暖かく天狗の麦飯抓みける
atatakaku tengu no mugimeshi tsunekikeru

矢島渚男 Yajima Nagisao (1935 - )

..............................................................................................................................................

Tengu no suzuri iwa 天狗の硯岩 Inkstone rock of the Tengu
at Mount Iizunayama




. suzuri 硯 inkstone, ink stone .

:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::



. . . CLICK here for Photos !
- reference 三郎天狗 -

:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::


. - - - Join my Tengupedia friends on facebook ! - - - .

:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::


. 四十八天狗 - 48 famous Tengu of Japan .

. Tengu 天狗と伝説 Tengu legends "Long-nosed Goblin" .

. - yookai, yōkai 妖怪 Yokai monsters - .

. Legends and Tales from Japan 伝説 - Introduction .

. Mingei 民芸 Regional Folk Art from Japan .

- #saburotengu #iizuna #izunagongen -
:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

[ . BACK to DARUMA MUSEUM TOP . ]
[ . BACK to WORLDKIGO . TOP . ]

:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

2016/08/14

Jirobo Tengu

[ . BACK to DARUMA MUSEUM TOP . ]
. Tengupedia - 天狗ペディア - Tengu ABC-Index .
:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

Jirooboo, Jirōbō 次郎坊 / 二郎坊 Jirobo Tengu
- 比良の次郎坊 Hira no Jirobo / 比良治郎坊


Jiro is usually used as a name for the second son of a family.
So Jirobo is the younger brother of Taro, the eldest son:

. Tarooboo, Tarōbō 太郎坊 Tarobo, Taro-Bo .
- Introduction 愛宕山太郎坊 -


source : youkaitama.seesaa.net/article


Jirobo first lived at Mount Hieizan 比叡山 (see below) but was driven away from by priest Saicho and the stronger mountain priests and moved on to 比良山 Hirasan in Shiga.

Tarobo and Jirobo used to live at Mount 赤神山 Akagamiyama in Shiga.


source : blog.goo.ne.jp/dreamgogogo
太郎坊宮 Tarobo Aka Jinja 阿賀神社



Tarobo to cast a vow - gankake 願掛け天狗 




source : blog.goo.ne.jp/dreamgogogo

..............................................................................................................................................


source : nichibun.ac.jp/YoukaiGazo

比良治郎坊 Hira Jirobo and  愛宕栄術太郎 Atago Taro 
by 一魁齋芳年(月岡芳年 Tsukioka Yoshitoshi )
顔つきは厳しく、眉毛が濃い。鼻は大きく、突き出している。法衣のような白っぽい着物を身に着けている。両腕を挙げ、前方を睨みつけている。



- quote -
The Hira Mountains (比良山地 Hira-sanchi) are a mountain range to the west of Lake Biwa on the border of Shiga Prefecture and Kyoto Prefecture, Japan. The range runs 15 kilometers (9.3 mi) north to south. It is narrowest in the southern part of the range, running 3 kilometers (1.9 mi) east to west, and broadest at the northern part of the range, running 10 kilometers (6.2 mi) km east to west. The eastern side of the Hira Mountains looks steeply over Lake Biwa, while the western side of the range forms a gentler valley in Kyoto.
The three main peaks of the Hira Mountains are 武奈ヶ岳 Mount Bunagatake, the highest with an elevation of 1,214.4 meters (3,984 ft); 蓬莱山 Hōraisan, at 1,174 meters (3,852 ft), and 打見山 Mount Uchimiyama at 1,103 meters (3,619 ft).
The spring snow of the Hira Mountains is one of the Eight Views of Ōmi.
西(安曇川)側を「奥比良」と呼び、東(琵琶湖)側稜線のうち、釈迦岳から堂満岳の一帯を「北比良」、
それ以南の蓬莱山・権現山の一帯を「南比良」、釈迦岳以北の岩阿沙利山・岳山の連なる標高500 - 700mの尾根を「リトル比良」と呼ぶことが多い。
- source : wikipedia -


..............................................................................................................................................

. Hieizan, Hiei-zan 比叡山 Mount Hiei - Kyoto .
and priest Saicho, Dengyo Daishi 伝教大師最澄

Legend says a learned monk from Mount Hieizan turned into a 大天狗 Big Tengu, maybe with a long nose 鼻高天狗,
Hieizan Hooseiboo 比叡山法性坊 Hoseibo.

Soni 尊意 Priest Soni, Son-I
(866 - 940)

He was the 13th head priest of the Tendai sect.
He is also known as 梨本祖師 or 法性房 Hoseibo.
He was born in Omi no Kuni.
- reference : wikipedia -


..............................................................................................................................................


僧正坊 Sojo-Bo, Sojobo from Kuramayama 鞍馬山 - Kurama Tengu
sometimes said Jirobo was the elder brother of the Kurama Tengu.


:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

. 太郎坊の杉 Tarobo-no-sugi and Jirobo-no-sugi 次郎坊の杉. .
at 羽田神社 Hada Jinj in Miyagi 宮城県

:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::


. - - - Join my Tengupedia friends on facebook ! - - - .

:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::


. 四十八天狗 - 48 famous Tengu of Japan .

. Tengu 天狗と伝説 Tengu legends "Long-nosed Goblin" .

. - yookai, yōkai 妖怪 Yokai monsters - .

. Legends and Tales from Japan 伝説 - Introduction .

. Mingei 民芸 Regional Folk Art from Japan .

- #jirobo #jirooboo -
:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

[ . BACK to DARUMA MUSEUM TOP . ]
[ . BACK to WORLDKIGO . TOP . ]

:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

Ajaribo Tengu

[ . BACK to DARUMA MUSEUM TOP . ]
. Tengupedia - 天狗ペディア - Tengu ABC-Index .
:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

Ajaribo 阿闍梨坊 Ajari-Bo Tengu
Higoajari, Higo Ajari 肥後阿闍梨 / 備後阿闍 the Ajari of Higo, Acharya of Higo
Kooen, Kōen 皇円 Saint Koen

(? - 1169)

First a short description of an Ajari:
- quote
ajari Sk: acarya.
Teacher or master. A title conferred on an eminent priest who guides his pupils and sets a good example. As a rank in the Japanese priesthood, it was first used in 857, and was conferred on masters of both the Tendai 天台 and Shingon 真言 sects.
- source : JAANUS


- - - - - Higo Ajari is one of the
. 四十八天狗 48 Tengu of Japan .

:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

Kooen, Kōen 皇円 Koen
諡号 -- 肥後阿闍梨 - Higo Ajari
尊称 -- 皇円大菩薩 - Koen Daibosatsu 皇円上人 Saint Koen Shonin
He was a priest of the Tendai sect and his most famous disciple was 法然 Saint Honen.
He died at Mount Hieizan 比叡山功徳院.


His statue at 蓮華院誕生寺奥之院

- quote -
Renge-in Tanjō-ji (蓮華院誕生寺) Tanjo-Ji
is a Buddhist temple of the Shingon Risshu, or Shingon-Vinaya Buddhism, in Tamana, Kumamoto Prefecture. It is the head temple of Shingon-Vinaya Buddhism in Kyūshū and a branch temple of Saidai-ji (西大寺) in Nara (奈良).
It venerates Maha-Bodhisattva Kōen (皇円大菩薩, Kōen Daibosatsu) as its patron deity.
The temple stands on the site of Jōkō-ji Renge-in which was founded either at the end of the Heian period or the beginning of the Kamakura period and burnt down during the wars of the Sengoku period. The first abbot Zeshin Kawahara (1896 - 1977) was instructed through a spiritual communication by Kōen to restore Jōkō-ji Renge-in, which he accomplished in 1930 and renamed it Renge-in Tanjō-ji ("Birth Temple") in honor of the fact that it stands on the birthplace of Kōen.
... The temple consists of the Main Temple and the Oku-no-in, or the Inner Temple, which is located 2.5 miles north of the Main Temple on Mt. Shōdai.
... 1937 The Acharya Hall (阿闍梨堂, Ajari-dō) completed.
...
Patron Deity Maha-Bodhisattva Kōen
is venerated as the patron deity. Kōen (皇円) was a Tendai monk in the latter part of the Heian period. Since he was said to have died on June 13 in 1169, it is assumed that he was born in 1074.

Kōen was born in Tsuji, Tamana-shō in Higo Province as a great-great-grandson of Kampaku Fujiwara no Michikane (藤原道兼). His father was Fujiwara no Shigekane (藤原重兼), governor of Buzen Province. In his teens, he took the novice's ordination with Kōgaku (皇覚), a master of Sugiu School (椙生流), at Mt. Hiei, and studied Exoteric Buddhism under him. He furthered his education by studying Esoteric Buddhism with Jōen (成円). He started going by the name of Kōen around this time by taking a Chinese character from each of his masters' names. He lived in Kudoku-in on Mt. Hiei and became known as the Acharya of Higo (肥後阿闍梨, Higo Ajari). Hōnen who founded Jōdo-shū, a major school of Pure Land Buddhism, was ordained under Kōen in his last years and became his disciple.

He was also a noted scholar known for his erudition. He wrote Fusō Ryakki (扶桑略記, A Concise History of Japan) which is considered Japan's first chronicle detailing the events (mainly related to Buddhism) from the reign of Emperor Jimmu to that of Emperor Horikawa in the chronological order.

The actual circumstances of his death are unknown. According to the biographies of Hōnen written in the latter part of the Kamakura period, on June 13, 1169, Kōen commenced tantric practice in the form of a draconic deity in Sakuraga-ike Pond in Enshū. Sakuraga-ike Pond is an actual dammed lake in Omaezaki, Shizuoka Prefecture.
- source : wikipedia -



皇円大菩薩絵巻 Koen Daibosatsu Emaki - Scroll about his life
- source : youtube.com/watch -

This temple is Nr. 21 蓮華院誕生寺 一願成就不動 - Renge-In
of the Kyushu Fudo Pilgrimage 九州三十六不動霊場.

. 九州三十六不動尊霊場 Kyushu - 36 Fudo temples .


- HP of the temple -
St. Koen was born to a noble family on the very site of Rengein-Tanjyoji temple in 1073, in the Heian Era, the era of the aristocracy. Holding the reins of Higo province government, his grandfather, Lord Shigefusa Fujiwara, (Kanpaku; the highest rank of courtiers). St. Koen entered the priesthood in his infancy. He studied Buddhism and practiced Buddhist training asceticism at Mt. Hiei near Kyoto. When he was young, he was very famous as a great priest, as well as being a profound Buddhist scholar in Japan.
He wrote "Fusoryakki," which is numbered among the three great chronicles in Japan, including "Dainihonshi" and "Nihonshoki".
He also educated thousands of disciples. At the age of 74, he granted the fundamentals of Jyodo Buddhism to 15-year-old Honen who then founded the Jyodo Sect (the Pure Land Sect) and became the master of the priest Shinran.



Because of St. Koen's vow to attain a miraculous power to save mankind, he entered Nirvana as a dragon-deity incarnate at Sakuragaike-pond in Shizuoka prefecture in 1169. Subsequently he received Bosatsugyo-training asceticism in the next world. ...
- source : www.rengein.jp -
2288 Tsuji, Tamana, Kumamoto / 熊本県玉名市築地2288



His most important work is Fusoo Ryakki 扶桑略記 Fuso Ryakki, written in 1094 on request of 堀河天皇 Horikawa Tenno (1079 - 1107), at Mount Hieizan. It contains 30 volumes

..............................................................................................................................................

Koen the Dragon Bodhisattva:
History and Hagiography, a Translation and Analysis of the "Fuso Ryujinden."



Aaron Patrick Proffitt (Author)

- quote
Kōen as Maitreya Devotee and Tengu
... the Fusoo ryuujinden claims that according to "folk-lore" and "myth", Koen was also said to be a Tengu, or mountain spirit/goblin. In these contexts he is referred to as the Higoajari 肥後阿闍梨, or the Ajari of Higo Kingdom.
- source : books.google.co.jp

..............................................................................................................................................

- quote -
Ōshōkyō-in 応声教院 山門 Sanmon Gate at Oshokyoin Temple
Oshokyoin Temple located in Nakauchida, Kikugawa City, Shizuoka Pref. is a temple of the Jodo sect. The principal object of worship is the statue of Amida Nyorai (quasi national treasure). The temple originates in Tengakuin Temple of the Tendai sect, which was established in 855 by the priest Jikaku Daishi as an Imperial prayer temple for Emperor Montoku. Later, Honen Shonin (1133-1212), the founder of the Jodo sect Buddhism, placed the statue of Amida here to the memory of his teacher, Koen Ajari, who was said to have transformed himself into the Ryujin (dragon god) to save people in Sakuragaike Pond in the neighboring town. The temple sect was changed from the Tendai sect to the Jodo sect and its name was also changed from Tengakuin to Oshokyoin at this time.



Oshokyoin is a branch temple of Chioin Temple in Kyoto. It is also known as the fudasho (a visiting place for pilgrims) for those who are born in the year of dragon and snake in Enshu (present-day Shizuoka Pref.) area. The temple possesses the manuscript of the Koen Ajari legend and the statue of Hafuki Amida Nyorai (Amida with mouth open). Up the stone steps at the entrance stands the Sanmon Gate (the temple gate), which was erected by the 2nd Shogun, Tokugawa Hidetada. In the precinct are full of unique objet d'art such as Nonbei Jizo (Bottle-man Jizo). There are also two of the Seven Wonders in Enshu, Mitabi-guri (a chestnut tree producing chestnuts three times a year) and Kataba-no-Ashi (the reed grass that has leaves on only one side of the stem).
- source : nippon-kichi.jp -

:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::


. Legends and Tales from Japan 伝説 - Introduction .

................................................................................. Nagano 長野県

Ajari-ike 阿闍梨池 The Ajari Pond
In 1198 建久9(1198)年正月18日,Saint Koen Ajari became a dragon thanks to his faith in 弥勒菩薩 Miroku Bosatsu. He came to the 善光寺如来堂 Nyorai Hall in the temple Zenko-Ji.
He walked around seven time and then went into the Ajarigaike pond, which was in fact a swamp. This swamp is now quite small, but if people perform 如来印文 certain rites of Nyorai for 17 days, it will become full of water. This happens because this pond in Nagano is said to be linked to the Sakuragaike in Shizuoka (遠州 Enshu), where he died.



. Zenkooji 善光寺 Zenko-Ji Nagano .


................................................................................. Sakuragaike 桜が池

Koen Ajari became a serpent and waited for his ascend as a dragon to the realm of Miroku Bosatsu.



When his death came near, he scooped some water from the pond and suddenly there were huge waves on the pond. Even now on a calm evening people can hear the sound of ritual bells near the pond.



Every year during the summer equinox people bring an offering of rice with red beans in a half-open bucket and someone pushes it into the water. Then the water begins to whirl and draws the bucket to the bottom.

- reference : nichibun yokai database 妖怪データベース -


:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::


- quote
Ajari Kikenbo - a Kingmaker Character
Languages:
Tengu, Common, Varisian, Draconic (kobold), Elvish
Homeland
Untrustworthy. Liars. Thieves. Ne’er-do-wells.
Sooner or later the names people call you begin to sink in and become your own identity. Such was the case with young Ajari.
- source : brevoy.obsidianportal.com


:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::


. - - - Join my Tengupedia friends on facebook ! - - - .

:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::


. - yookai, yōkai 妖怪 Yokai monsters - .

. Tengu 天狗と伝説 Tengu legends "Long-nosed Goblin" .

. Legends and Tales from Japan 伝説 - Introduction .

. Mingei 民芸 Regional Folk Art from Japan .

- #tengu -
:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

[ . BACK to DARUMA MUSEUM TOP . ]
[ . BACK to WORLDKIGO . TOP . ]

:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

Tengupedia - ABC

. Tengu 天狗と伝説 Tengu legends "Long-nosed Goblin" .
:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

- - - - - BACKUP from August 24, 2016.



The original is here:

. Tengupedia - 天狗ペディア - Tengu ABC-List .



. Tengu 天狗と伝説 Tengu legends "Long-nosed Goblin" .
:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

Tengupedia - 天狗ペディア - Tengu ABC-List
Tengu 天狗 "heavenly dog" - "celestial dog"

. Tengu 天狗 Introduction in the Darumapedia .
Tengu are supernatural creatures found in Japanese folklore, art, theater, and literature. They are one of the best known Yokai妖怪 and are sometimes worshiped as 神 Shinto deities.


- Tengu mask from my collection -


. The most important Tengu of Japan .
日本三大天狗 3 most important Tengu
八天狗 8 Tengu of Japan
四十八天狗 48 Tengu of Japan

:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

***** . Ajari 阿闍梨坊 Ajari-Bo Tengu 肥後阿闍梨 Higo Ajari Kōen 皇円 Saint Koen .

. Akibagongen 秋葉権現 Akiba Gongen .

aotengu 八ヶ岳の天狗岳は赤天狗、青天狗 Ao-Tengu blue/green Tengu, Yatsugatake
. Toyota Toki とよた 時 / とよだ 時 Toyoda Toki - 山里漫画家 Tengu Manga .


Beshimi Tengu 癋見 / 閉歯見 O-beshimi. with a Noh mask (MS)
beshimi means mouth clamped firmly shut.

. beer 天狗 ビール Tengu Beer brands - photos .

. books about - Tengu . - - - - - - - - - - - . books about - 天狗 .

***** ***** . Buzenboo, Buzenbō 豊前坊 Buzenbo, Buzen-Bo Tengu .
彦山豊前坊 - Hikozan Buzenbo, Fukuoka

choochin 提灯 / 提燈 Chochin lanterns with Tengu
. . . CLICK here for Photos !


. Dairoku Ten Maoo 第六天魔王 Dairoku Ten Mao .
- supposed to be a Tengu

. dai tengu, daitengu 大天狗 great Tengu, big Tengu, major Tengu .

. Daruma and Tengu 天狗とだるま .
- Little Daruma & Little Tengu だるまちゃんとてんぐちゃん book by Satoshi Kako

Dōryō Daigongen, Dooryoo 道了大権現 Doryo Daigongen (MS)
- TENGU WHO BECOMES A BOSATSU


. ema 天狗絵馬 votive tablets with Tengu .

Enkai Tengu of Mount Haguro (MS)
- teaches martial arts to Tsukahara Bokuden

/ Haguro san mizu tengu 羽黒山の水天狗円光坊
***** . Enkooboo 円光坊, Enkobo, Enko-Bo " 水天狗円光坊 "Water Tengu" .
at Mount Hagurosan - Yamagata, one of the 四十八天狗 48 Tengu of Japan

***** . Fuji Tengu 富士天狗(富士太郎)Tengu from Mount Fuji .
- Daraniboo, Daranibō 陀羅尼坊 Darani-Bo, Daranibo
This is the most important of all the Tengu goblins from Japan. In Gotenba town, he is called "Fuji Taro".


. eggplants 天狗ナス Tengu nasu - photos .


. Fuujin 風神としての天狗 Tengu as God of the Wind .


Garuda, Karura (MS)
. Garuda Bird, Karura 迦楼羅 King Garuda, Karura O 迦楼羅王.

. geta 下駄 wooden clogs of a Tengu .

. guhin, kuhin 狗賓 "dog guest" Tengu . *


. hachidaitengu 八大天狗 eight great Tengu .


. hanadaka tengu 鼻高天狗 long--nosed tengu .
hana ga takai 鼻が高い the long nose of a Tengu

. hanafuda 天狗花札 Tengu "Flower Trump" card game .

- 任天堂 Nintendo 1889

***** Hanzōbō 半僧坊 Hanzobo Kamakura (MS)

. ha uchiwa 天狗の羽団扇 "feather fan of a Tengu - photos .

. History of the Tengu in Japan .


Hooinboo, Tsukuba-hōin, 筑波法印坊 Tsukuba Hoin-Bo of 日立 Hitachi Province
Ibaraki, Mount Tsukubasan 筑波山 (WI)


***** . Hookiboo, Hōkibō 伯耆坊 Hoki-Bo, Hokibo . - From Mount Daisen, Tottori



. ichimon tengubata . hata 一文天狗旗 flag with tengu goblin .
Miyagi

. illustrations 天狗 イラスト - photos .

. Izuna Daigongen 飯縄大権現 Iizuna Daigongen .
- and Saburo Tengu

***** . Jirooboo, Jirōbō 次郎坊 / 二郎坊 Jirobo Tengu .
- 比良の次郎坊 Hira no Jirobo / 比良治郎坊


karasu tengu 烏天狗 "crow Tengu" (MS) (WI)
a minor tengu, with the head and wings of a black crow
-- Crow Tengu Riding Boar (Karasu Tengu 烏天狗騎猪) (MS)

. Kashozan 迦葉山 a Tengu mountain .
群馬県 沼田市上発知町445番地 Gunma, Numata

. kawatengu, kawa tengu 川天狗 river Tengu, a kind of Kappa .

. kendama けん玉 cup and ball with Tengu .

. Kidoomaru, Kidōmaru 鬼童丸 Kidomaru .
Kidomaru learning magic from the tengu / Utagawa Kuniyoshi 歌川国芳

. Knutsen, Roald Knutsen - Book .
Tengu -The Shamanic and Esoteric Origins of the Japanese Martial Arts

. kobutori jiisan こぶとりじいさん / 瘤取り爺さん "The Old Man's Lump Removed" .
- folktale
source : mytwoyenworth.blogspot.jp

. kokeshi こけしの天狗 / 天狗こけし wooden dolls of Tengu . *

. koma, Tengu koma 天狗独楽 spinning top with a Tengu . - Saitama
- - - - - . koma 独楽 more spinning tops with Tengu .


konoha tengu, koppa tengu 木の葉天狗 a kind of karasu tengu (WI)
- small, bird-like konoha-tengu who live in Cryptomeria trees.

***** . Konkooboo 金光坊 Konko-Bo, Mount Hagurosan - Yamagata .
- maybe identical to Sankooboo 三光坊 Sanko-Bo


. Konpira mairi 金比羅参り pilgrimage to Mount Konpirasan Shikoku .
Konpira pilgrims carrying a tengu mask on their rucksack wooden box (oizuri)

***** Kootenbo, Kōtenbō 高天坊 Kotenbo of 葛城 Katsuragi (WI)

kotengu 小天狗 small Tengu, minor Tengu, servants of the Daitengu.

. Kurama Tengu 鞍馬天狗 - Kyoto.
Goho Mao Son 護法魔王尊, the great King of the conquerors of evil and the spirit of the earth, looks almost like a Tengu himself. 僧正坊 Sojobo



. Legends 天狗と伝説 Tengu legends "Long-nosed Goblin" .



Martial arts and Tengu (WI)

. matches 天狗 マッチ to light a fire - photos .

- - - - - matsuri 天狗まつり Tengu festivals - - - - -
. Sakaide 坂出の天狗まつり Tengu Festival in Sakaide .
- Dontsuku Festival, Inatori City with Tengu lanterns (MS)


. men 天狗面 Tengu masks - photos .
- Tengu Noh Mask, (MS)

. metengu, me tengu 女天狗 female Tengu, Amanozako .
長野・修那羅峠の女性天狗 - female Tengu, Nagano, Shunara Pass
東京 高尾山の天狗は女天狗? - female Tengu at Takao san

. Mingei 民芸と天狗 folk art motives with the Tengu Goblin .
. dorei どれい / 土鈴 clay bells .
. ema 絵馬 votive tablets .
. hariko 張子 papermachee dolls .
. Kappa 河童 the Water Goblin .
. kokeshi こけし wooden dolls .
. maneki neko, manekineko 招き猫 beckoning cat .
. tako 凧 kites .
. tsuchi ningyoo 土人形 tsuchiningyo clay dolls .
. ukiyo-e 浮世絵 "pictures of the floating world" .


. Mirokuji 弥勒寺 Miroku-Ji . Gunma Kashozan 迦葉山弥勒寺

. Miyukiji 御幸寺 Miyuki-Ji .
Ehime, Matsuyama-shi, Miyuki, 1 Chome−442−1
with Haiku by Masaoka Shiki

mizutengu, mizu tengu, ?suitengu 水天狗 "Water Tengu", see kawatengu

. mukai tengu ema 迎い天狗絵馬 Tengu facing each other .
- and many ema votive tablets

***** Myoogiboo, Myōgibō 妙義坊 Myogibo of Mount Ueno, Tokyo (WI)

. ningyoo 天狗人形 dolls and figures of Tengu .

nokkingoo 秩父・破風山のノッキン坊天狗 nokkinbo Tengu, Chichibu Happusan
. Toyota Toki とよた 時 / とよだ 時 Toyoda Toki - 山里漫画家 Tengu Manga .



. o-mamori, omamori 天狗 お守り amulets with a Tengu .

- - - - - Origins of Tengu (MS)

. pants 天狗 パンツ for the real man ! - photos .

. pokkuri tengu ぽっくり天狗 Tengu for a healthy long life and sudden death .

Protective spirits and deities - (WI)
the Shasekishū, 沙石集 a book of Buddhist parables from the Kamakura period, makes a point of distinguishing between good and bad tengu.


.......................................................................

. proverbs and sayings with "Tengu" ことわざ kotowaza .
koboozu hitori tengu hachinin 小坊主ひとり天狗八人
Tengudaoshi, Tengu-daoshi 天狗だおし / 天狗倒し
- Tengu bayashi 天狗囃子 / Tengu taiko 天狗太鼓 / Tengu warai 天狗笑い
Tengu kakushi 天狗隠し
Tengu no miakashi, me-akashi 天狗の御燈 (roojinbi 老人火, 怪火 ghost fire)
Tengu ni naru 天狗になる / hana ga takaku naru 鼻が高くなる
Tengu ni karakasa torareta yoo 天狗に唐傘取られたよう
Tengu no kinobori 天狗の木登り
Tengu no koogeki 天狗の攻撃
Tengu no nagesan 天狗の投げ算
Tengu sarai 天狗攫い (same as Tengu kakushi)
Tengu tsubute 天狗つぶて / 天狗礫
Tengu no yusaburi 天狗の揺さぶり
tsuri Tengu ni kikimimi nashi 釣り天狗に聞き耳なし
- to be updated

.......................................................................


raamen ラーメン Ramen noodle shops named Tengu
. . . CLICK here for Photos !


. Restaurants named Tengu 天狗 レストラン - だるまてんぐ .
- - - - - eateries named 天狗食堂 Tengu shokudo
. . . CLICK here for Photos !


***** Ryuuhooboo Ryūhōbō 笠鋒坊 Ryuhobo of Mount Kōmyō (WI)

.............................................................................................................................................



..............................................................................................................................................

. saba 鯖 mackerels, a Tengu dislikes 天狗は鯖が苦手 / 天狗は鯖が嫌い .

***** . Saburoo, Saburō 三郎天狗 Saburo Tengu
飯綱三郎天狗 Izuna Saburo Tengu - Nagano .

- - - - - Izuna Daigongen 飯縄大権現 Iizuna Daigongen

***** . Saganbo Tengu 相模坊 Sagamibō, Sagamibo . from 白峰山 Shiraminesan, 坂出 Sakaide, Sanuki

***** Sanjakuboo, Sanjakubō 三尺坊 Sanjakubo of Mount Akiba - Akiba Gongen 秋葉権現 (WI)

. sake 天狗 酒 Tengu Sake rice wine brands - photos .

***** Sakuraboo 桜坊天狗 Sakurabo Tengu, Mitakesan 御岳山
. Toyota Toki とよた 時 - Manga .

***** Sankiboo Sankibō 三鬼坊 Sankibo of Itsukushima (WI)

***** . Sankooboo 三光坊 Sanko-Bo, Mount Hagurosan - Yamagata .
- maybe identical to 金光坊 Konko-Bo.

. sanshoo tengu 山椒天狗 Tengu from wood of the mountain pepper .

. Sarutahiko 猿田彦 (Sarudahiko, Saruta-biko) .
- a long-nosed Shintō deity

***** Seiroku Tengu 清六天狗 from Hayachine 早池峰山, Iwate (Tono monogatari)
. Toyota Toki とよた 時 / とよだ 時 Toyoda Toki - 山里漫画家 Tengu Manga .


shibaten, shibatengu シバテン, 芝天狗 "lawn Tengu" from Shikoku (WI)
. Shibaten しばてん / 芝天 otter and Kappa from Tosa .

. Shichi Tengu-e 七天狗絵 The Seven Tengu Scrolls .
by Haruko Wakabayashi

. shochu 天狗 焼酎 Tengu Shochu Schnaps - photos .

. shoogi 天狗将棋 Tengu Shogi board game .

. shuin 天狗朱印 temple stamps with Tengu .

***** Soojooboo, Sōjōbō 僧正坊 Sojobo, Sojo-Bo Tengu (at Mount Kurama 鞍馬山) (MS)

Sōzan Chomon Kishū, Soozan Chomon Kishuu 想山著聞奇集 (WI)
- with two Tengu stories from the 19th century


. Takao san 高尾山 a Tengu mountain . - Tokyo
Yakuo-In 薬王院 - and Naigubu 内供奉

tamariba, 箱根・明神ヶ岳は天狗のたまり場 tengu no tamari-ba
. Toyota Toki とよた 時 / とよだ 時 Toyoda Toki - 山里漫画家 Tengu Manga .

. Tarooboo, Tarōbō 天狗太郎坊 Tarobo Tengu, Taro-Bo Legends .
from Mount Atago 愛宕山
- Taroobooguu 太郎坊宮 Shrine for the Tengu Tarobo, Shiga
and maybe a Tarobo on Mt. Fuji


.......................................................................

- - - - - Tengu - Evil spirits and angry ghosts / Great and small demons (WI)

- - - - - Tengu Evolution (MS)

Tengudake 天狗岳 Mount Tengudake

Tengudoo, tengudō 天狗道 Tengudo, the Realm of Tengu (WI)

. Tenguiwa, Tengu-Iwa 天狗岩 "Tengu boulder" . - Kurao 倉尾村 in Chichibu

. Tengu Kogen 天狗高原 Tengu Highlands, Kochi - photos .

. Tengumai 天狗舞 Tengu Mai Sake 酒 .

Tengu meigikoo, Tengu Meigikō 天狗名義考 Tengu meigiko, book (WI)

tengu ni naru 天狗になる "becoming a Tengu" describes a conceited person

. tengu no goohan 天狗の強飯 large rice portion of the Tengu goblin - Nikko

tengu no hauchiwa 天狗の羽団扇 "The Tengu's Fan" (WI)
- folktale
source : mytwoyenworth.blogspot.jp

tengu no hyootan, tengu no hyotan 天狗の瓢箪 "The Tengu's gourd" (WI)
- folktale
source : mytwoyenworth.blogspot.jp

tengu no kakruemino 天狗の隠れ蓑 "The Tengu's Magic Cloak" (WI)
- folktale : The Tengu's magic cape
source : mytwoyenworth.blogspot.jp

tengu no koma 天狗のこま - folk tale - mukashibanashi
- reference source : nihon.syoukoukai.com/modules -

. Tengu no mugimeshi 天狗の麦飯 boiled barley and rice of the Tengu .
- special moss from Nagano

. Tengu no suzuri iwa 天狗の硯岩 Inkstone rock of the Tengu .
- at Mount Iizunayama, Nagano

Tengu no yama utsuri 天狗の山移り "Tengu moving to another mountain"
. Toyota Toki とよた 時 / とよだ 時 Toyoda Toki - 山里漫画家 Tengu Manga .


Tengu Parody, Print by Utagawa Kuniyoshi (MS)

. tengu sarai 天狗攫い / tengu kakushi 天狗隠し - kidnapped, abducted by a Tengu . *

tengushin, Tengu Shin 天狗神 Tengu Kami deity (WI)

tengushide, tengu shide テングシデ / 四手 Tengu Shide Tree, fm. Carpinus
source : kankou.pref.hiroshima.jp

tengu to ? "The Tengu and the Woodcutter" (WI)
- folktale

Tengu zooshi emaki, Tenguzōshi emaki, 天狗草紙絵巻 Tenhgu Zoshi Emaki - picture scroll of Tengu - 1296 (MS)

.......................................................................

. tiangou, Tien Kou 天狗 dog-like Chinese demon . (MS)

. tokin 頭巾. 頭襟 small cap of a Tengu and Yamabushi .

Tonyuugyoo, Tonyūgyō 頓遊行神 Tonyugo Tengu
and his partner
Suyochisoo, Suyochisō 須臾馳走神 Suyochiso Tengu (MS)
- The two are considered Dakini’s attendants

. toofu 豆腐 Legends about Tofu and Tengu .

Tori, 秩父・ 両神山の刀利天狗 Tori Tengu
. Toyota Toki とよた 時 / とよだ 時 Toyoda Toki - 山里漫画家 Tengu Manga .

. Torii Kiyomasu I 鳥居清倍 - illustration .

. Toyota Toki とよた 時 / とよだ 時 Toyoda Toki - 山里漫画家 Tengu Manga .


udon 天狗うどん Tengu Udon noodles
. 天狗うどん作り How to make Tengu Udon Noodles .


. ukiyo-e 浮世絵 "pictures of the floating world" .
. Kawanabe Kyosai 河鍋暁斎 (1831 - 1889) .

ushi ni natta Tengu 牛になった天狗 Tengu became a bull
. Toyota Toki とよた 時 - Manga .


. Utagawa Kuniyoshi 歌川国芳 (1797 - 1861) .
Kyôga tengu no korishô - Tengu no hana Tengu and their noses" / An elephant catching a flying Tengu


. waffles 天狗焼き Tengu Yaki .

. Wilson, Sean Michael Wilson - Issai Chozanshi - Book .
The Demon's Sermon on the Martial Arts: A Graphic Novel


yamabushi tengu 山伏天狗 mountain monk Tengu (MS)

Yama no Kami and Tengu 山神としての天狗 Tengu as Deity of the Mountain
yama tengu 山天狗 "Mountain Tengu"
天狗礫 / 天狗田 / 天狗の爪とぎ石 / 天狗の山 / 天狗谷 / 天狗の領地 / 狗賓の住処 /天狗つぶて / 天狗囃子 / 山神楽 Yamakagura / 天狗太鼓 / 天狗の火 / 天狗倒し / 天狗礫 / 天狗火 / 天狗の揺さぶり / 天狗沢
天狗の宮を木霊神社 Kodama Jinja
- reference : -

yama tengu 山天狗 Mountain Tengu
tale by Mizuki Shigeru Mizuki

yonjuuhachi tengu 四十八天狗 48 famous Tengu


. yuigesa 結袈裟 Kesa sash with pompons - photos . (WI)


***** Zenkiboo Zenkibō 前鬼坊 Zenkibo of Mount Ōmine
那智滝本前鬼坊, one of the eight Tengu and one of the 48 Tengu of Japan.
. the woman Zenki 前鬼 and her husband Goki 後鬼 .
and the priest En no Gyoja 役行者.


Zhang Xian shooting at a tiangou to protect his children clustered about him (wi - photo)


:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

- Reference -

Legends of Japan
by Hiroshi Naito (Author), Masahiko Nishino (Illustrator)

:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::


. - - - Join my Tengupedia friends on facebook ! - - - .

The latest additions are on facebook !

:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::


- - - reference : Mark Schumacher (MS) - - -
- - - reference : wikipedia (WI) - - -


:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

. - yookai, yōkai 妖怪 Yokai monsters - .

. Tengu 天狗と伝説 Tengu legends "Long-nosed Goblin" .

. Legends and Tales from Japan 伝説 - Introduction .

. Mingei 民芸 Regional Folk Art from Japan .

- #tengupedialist #tengu #tengupedia -
:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

[ . BACK to DARUMA MUSEUM TOP . ]
[ . BACK to WORLDKIGO . TOP . ]

:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::